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  • Studying neurodevelopmental disorders

    Stanford Medicine research on Timothy syndrome — which predisposes newborns to autism and epilepsy — may extend well beyond the rare genetic disorder to schizophrenia and other conditions.

  • Chuck Chan dies at 48

    The Stanford Medicine researcher was known for his groundbreaking work and his generous spirit as a mentor and colleague.

  • New epilepsy target

    Researchers find that a little-understood part of the brain appears to be involved in starting seizures and keeping them going.

  • Former medical school dean dies

    David Korn devoted nearly 30 years to Stanford Medicine as chair of pathology and dean of the medical school, overseeing the rise to national prominence amid tumultuous and historic change.

  • AI models help clinician communication

    A new artificial intelligence model helps physicians and nurses work together at Stanford Hospital to boost patient care.

  • Elizabeth Mellins dies

    Mellins, who studied autoimmune disease and co-founded a large pediatric rheumatology research network, was a tireless mentor and advocate for her field.

  • Psychosis starts in two brain systems

    When the brain has trouble filtering incoming information and predicting what’s likely to happen, psychosis can result, Stanford Medicine-led research shows.

  • AI advice helps skin cancer diagnoses

    Artificial intelligence algorithms powered by deep learning improve skin cancer diagnostic accuracy for doctors, nurse practitioners and medical students in a study led by the Stanford Center for Digital Health.

  • Unexpected cells may spread COVID-19

    A previously overlooked type of immune cell allows SARS-CoV-2 to proliferate, Stanford Medicine scientists have found. The discovery has important implications for preventing severe COVID-19.

  • Virtual biopsy shows promise

    Stanford Medicine researchers develop a new imaging method to create a cell-by-cell reconstruction of skin or other tissue without taking a biopsy.


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers