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  • Chief diversity and inclusion officer

    Joyce Sackey, advocate and leader of inclusive excellence, will join Stanford Medicine as its inaugural chief diversity and inclusion officer.

  • New pediatric emergency department opens

    The Stanford Medicine Pediatric Emergency Department opens Aug. 10. The child-centered space puts kids at ease while medical professionals deliver advanced care.

  • What to know about monkeypox

    The monkeypox virus is normally endemic to Africa but has recently been found on other continents. It spreads through prolonged, direct contact with infected people or their bedding, clothing and towels.

  • Reshuffling liver transplant waitlist

    An updated scoring system developed by Stanford Medicine researchers will more accurately prioritize patients on the liver transplant waiting list based on medical urgency.

  • Magazine explores molecules within us

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the molecules that make us who we are and how understanding them can lead to medical discoveries and innovations.

  • Small increase in risk with prostate radiation

    Receiving radiation for prostate cancer increases the risk of other cancers very slightly, Stanford Medicine researchers find, allowing providers to better inform patients weighing treatment options.

  • Stanford Health Care among nation’s top hospitals

    For eighth year running, U.S. News & World Report ranks Stanford Health Care one of the nation’s highest-rated hospitals.

  • Malenka on psychedelic drugs and disorders

    Robert Malenka’s early research on the molecular mechanisms underlying memory and learning has led to an understanding of their role in psychiatric disorders including addiction, depression and autism spectrum disorder.

  • Mark Davis on immunology research

    Vaccinology has taken great leaps forward in the past decade, largely due to advanced analytical methods as well as a shift in researchers’ focus from rodents to humans.

  • Hints into long COVID

    People with lower levels of an antiviral antibody as well as those with lung disease take longer to clear COVID-19 symptoms, say Stanford Medicine researchers.


2022 ISSUE 1

Understanding the world within us

COVID-19 Updates

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A dedicated page provides the latest information and developments related to the pandemic.