Five professors elected to National Academy of Medicine

Laurence Baker, Jeffrey Goldberg, Steven Goodman, Fei-Fei Li and Hannah Valantine are among the 90 regular members and 10 international members elected this year to the National Academy of Medicine.

Laurence Baker, Jeffrey Goldberg, Steven Goodman, Fei-Fei Li and Hannah Valantine were elected members of the National Academy of Medicine.

The National Academy of Medicine has elected five Stanford professors, including four from the School of Medicine, to its membership.

They are among the 90 regular members and 10 international members elected this year to the academy, which provides policymakers, professionals, business leaders and the public with independent, scientifically informed analysis and recommendations on issues related to health and the biomedical sciences.

New members are elected by current members through a process that recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care and public health.

Laurence Baker, PhD, professor of medicine and the Bing Professor of Human Biology, was elected for “contributions on consequences of rapid health care technology adoption, the importance of physician practice organization for costs and outcomes, the proliferation of out-of-network billing, and physician gender-based income disparities.”

Jeffrey Goldberg, MD, PhD, professor and chair of ophthalmology and the Blumenkranz Smead Professor, was elected “for his contribution to the understanding of the regeneration of retinal ganglion cells and axonal growth, and for being a driving force behind vision restoration clinical trials in glaucoma therapeutics and biomarker development.”

Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD, associate dean for clinical and translational research and professor of epidemiology and population health and of medicine, was elected “for his expertise in scientific inference and research reproducibility, utilizing diverse methods to inform public decisions about medical interventions. His work has led to a long series of critical contributions to national deliberative bodies, including medical journals, funders, insurers, the courts, and the NAM,” an acronym for the National Academy of Medicine.

Fei-Fei Li, PhD, professor of computer science and co-director of the Stanford Institute of Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, was elected “for helping establish the field of vision-based artificial intelligence, engendering diverse high-yield medical applications, including her current innovative focus on health-critical clinician and patient behavior recognition.”

Hannah Valantine, MBBS, DSc, professor of medicine, senior investigator at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and former chief officer of scientific workforce diversity at the National Institutes of Health, was elected “for her national leadership in both scientific workforce diversity and cardiac transplantation research. Her data-driven approach in these two important areas has led to game-changing policies and new programs that enriched the nation’s biomedical talent pool and have generated paradigm-shifting innovations in patient care.”



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