02

  • New guidelines suggested for liver cancer

    A Stanford Medicine study identifies an easily measured biophysical property that can identify Type 2 diabetics at increased risk for liver cancer who don’t meet current screening guidelines.

  • DNA shows Roman Empire migration

    The team led by Stanford Medicine analyzed thousands of genomes, including those newly sequenced from 204 skeletons, to gain insight into how and where people moved during the Roman Empire.

  • Telomeres lengthen with weight management

    Children with obesity in a six-month healthy eating and exercise program experienced increases in their average telomere length, suggesting reversal of premature aging, a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers found.

  • Inaugural Health Equity Symposium

    At the 2024 Health Equity Symposium, speakers emphasized that racism is alive and well, and workshop attendees identified ways to tackle health disparities.

  • AI helps manage Type 2 diabetes

    A new study led by Stanford Medicine indicates that an AI app can help Type 2 diabetic patients manage their blood glucose levels.

  • Screening, treatment halve breast cancer deaths

    Treatment of metastatic disease is responsible for nearly one-third of the decrease in annual deaths from breast cancer from 1975 to 2019, according to a Stanford Medicine-led study.

  • Autopsy, morgue and decedent care

    Stanford Hospital brings together two autopsy rooms, the morgue and decedent care team offices. The new space allows for more advanced research and includes bereavement and viewing rooms for families.

  • Psychiatrist Craig Barr Taylor dies at 78

    Taylor, a Stanford Medicine professor emeritus, took a public health approach to mental health and was an early proponent of digital interventions for anxiety and eating disorders.

  • Drug treats vets’ PTSD and depression

    Stanford Medicine researchers find that ibogaine, a plant-based psychoactive compound, safely led to improvements in depression, anxiety and functioning among veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

  • Brain stimulation can improve hypnotizability

    Stanford Medicine scientists used transcranial magnetic stimulation to temporarily enhance hypnotizability in patients with chronic pain, making them better candidates for hypnotherapy.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care