News & Research

  • Albertelli now heads comparative medicine

    Animal model expert and genetics researcher Megan Albertelli, DVM, PhD, now heads Stanford School of Medicine department that contrasts human and animal health.

  • New compound supercharges naloxone

    In a Stanford Medicine-led study, researchers combed through billions of compounds to find one that could enhance naloxone’s ability to fend off more potent opioids, with promising results in mice.

  • Tapping the inner muse

    “Honor the wisdom, the universe of knowledge that lies untouched within you,” the physician and novelist told the newly minted MDs, PhDs and master’s degree holders.

  • Wu Liu dies at 51

    Wu Liu, known for his sense of humor and optimism, was a national expert in radiation treatments for eye cancer.

  • Gene therapy for neurologic disease

    Experts at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health helped conduct clinical trials for the new therapy, which gives kids with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD, a functioning copy of the abnormal gene.

  • Customizable AI tool aids pathologists

    The artificial intelligence technology can be trained by pathologists, giving them personalized assistance in identifying cells that might indicate diseases such as cancer or endometritis.

  • ‘Optimism is simply the better choice’

    At the graduation ceremony, Minor encouraged the Class of 2024 to choose optimism in their careers: “Create the best out of any situation and be the light that leads others.”…

  • Graduation emphasizes personal growth

    Speakers at the ceremony that awarded PhD, MD and master’s degrees encourage students to adopt optimism, listen to their muse and dance to their own beat.

  • Blood pressure drug may prevent epilepsy

    In an analysis of more than 2 million patient records, researchers discovered that people taking angiotensin receptor blockers for high blood pressure were less likely to develop epilepsy.

  • Study reveals six depression subtypes

    Brain imaging, known as functional MRI, combined with machine learning can predict a treatment response based on one’s depression “biotype.”…


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers

Learn more about responsible AI in health and medicine


Other Stanford
Medicine News

July 11, 2024 – Stanford Medicine Children’s Health

Stanford Medicine Children’s Health Celebrates Decades of Excellence Saving Young Transplant Patients

2024 marks 50 years of pediatric heart transplants and 35 years of pediatric lung transplants at Stanford Medicine.

May 31, 2024 – Health Matters

Scientists share practical prevention tips for inflammation, cognitive health, and heart disease at Health Matters

The Bay Area community was out in full force on Saturday, May 18, for Stanford Medicine’s annual free community health event, Health Matters. Held outdoors on the medical school campus, more than 1,500 attendees gathered to listen to health talks and explore interactive exhibits at a health pavilion staffed by professionals from Stanford Medicine and Stanford Health Care.

May 21, 2024 – Stanford HAI

Stanford AI Projects Greenlighted in National AI Research Resource Pilot

Robotics and hospital computer vision projects receive NSF grants as part of an innovative pilot program to democratize AI research.

May 15 – Stanford Cancer Institute

20th anniversary of the Stanford Cancer Institute

The Stanford Cancer Institute celebrates its 20th anniversary.

May 15 – Stanford Cancer Institute

Curing Advanced Cancers Think Tank

To explore innovative approaches, technologies, and strategies to cure advanced cancers, the Stanford Cancer Institute hosted a group of nationally recognized cancer experts on the Stanford campus for a two-day think tank collaborative on April 3 and 4, 2024.

May 1, 2024 – Stanford Report

Stanford faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences

Seven Stanford researchers join the scholarly society.

April 24, 2024 – Stanford Medicine Children’s Health

Stanford Medicine Children’s Health Welcomes New Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplantation

Marc Melcher, MD, has been appointed the new Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplantation at Stanford Medicine. In his new role, he oversees all aspects of abdominal transplant programs, including liver, kidney, and small bowel transplantation at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health.

April 18, 2024 – Stanford Report

Stanford faculty named AAAS Fellows

Seven Stanford faculty are among the 502 new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

April 15, 2024 – Stanford Cancer Institute

Stanford Scientists and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Identify Protein That Controls CAR-T Cell Longevity

Cancer scientists at Stanford and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) identified a protein, FOXO1, that improves the survival and function of CAR-T cells, which may lead to more effective CAR-T cell therapies and could potentially expand its use in difficult-to-treat cancers.

February 21, 2024 – Stanford News

A new RNA editing tool could enhance cancer treatment

The new study found that an RNA-targeting CRISPR platform could tune immune cell metabolism without permanent genetic changes, potentially unveiling a relatively low-risk way to upgrade existing cell therapies for cancer.

February 21, 2024 – SPARK Stanford

SPARK publishes manuscript in Nature Biotechnology

SPARK has published a paper in the journal Nature Biotechnology describing the unique community and methods the program has developed to address challenges in translating academic discoveries to medical products.

February 20, 2024 – Stanford HAI

In Cardiology Trial, Doctors Receptive to AI Collaboration

Doctors worked with a prototype AI assistant and adapted their diagnoses based on AI’s input, which led to better clinical decisions.

February 20, 2024 – Department of Medicine

A New Era of Cardiovascular Care: Insights from Dr. Joseph Wu

As we observe American Heart Month this February, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, shares his insights into the current state of cardiovascular medicine and what the future might hold for treating and preventing heart disease.

January 30, 2024 – Global Health

Equipping doctors to save lives when resources are scarce

Stanford Surgeon Sherry Wren’s International Humanitarian Surgical Skills Course, now in its tenth year at Stanford, has equipped hundreds of surgeons and healthcare providers with the unique skills and knowledge they need to save lives in conflict zones and low-resource settings.

January 16 – Stanford Report

IntroSem reveals the magic of medical imaging

An introductory seminar dives into the technologies behind the shadowy photos of anatomy that give clinicians a window into our most personal of spaces.

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