News & Research

  • Augmented reality in the OR

    Stanford Medicine physician uses augmented reality to streamline data visualization during surgery.

  • Gift to help entrepreneurs

    Longtime donor Li Ka-shing also provides support for leading faculty members.

  • Antonio Omuro is new neurology chair

    The former chief of neuro-oncology at the Yale School of Medicine is a highly regarded scientist specializing in the study of brain tumors and an advocate of those underrepresented in medicine.

  • Drug lowers food allergy risk

    A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Women’s and men’s brain patterns differ

    Stanford Medicine researchers have developed a powerful new artificial intelligence model that can distinguish between male and female brains.

  • Ketamine response may vary by sex

    A new study in rats led by Stanford Medicine researchers looked at whether ketamine’s effects depend on opioid pathways — and uncovered a surprising difference between males and females.

  • Ensuring science integrity

    At a convention on “future proofing” science, participants stressed that institutions can provide training, establish policies and create a culture that rewards rigorous and reproducible studies.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.

  • New guidelines suggested for liver cancer

    A Stanford Medicine study identifies an easily measured biophysical property that can identify Type 2 diabetics at increased risk for liver cancer who don’t meet current screening guidelines.

  • DNA shows Roman Empire migration

    The team led by Stanford Medicine analyzed thousands of genomes, including those newly sequenced from 204 skeletons, to gain insight into how and where people moved during the Roman Empire.


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers

Learn more about responsible AI in health and medicine


Other Stanford
Medicine News

May 31, 2024 – Health Matters

Scientists share practical prevention tips for inflammation, cognitive health, and heart disease at Health Matters

The Bay Area community was out in full force on Saturday, May 18, for Stanford Medicine’s annual free community health event, Health Matters. Held outdoors on the medical school campus, more than 1,500 attendees gathered to listen to health talks and explore interactive exhibits at a health pavilion staffed by professionals from Stanford Medicine and Stanford Health Care.

May 21, 2024 – Stanford HAI

Stanford AI Projects Greenlighted in National AI Research Resource Pilot

Robotics and hospital computer vision projects receive NSF grants as part of an innovative pilot program to democratize AI research.

May 15 – Stanford Cancer Institute

20th anniversary of the Stanford Cancer Institute

The Stanford Cancer Institute celebrates its 20th anniversary.

May 15 – Stanford Cancer Institute

Curing Advanced Cancers Think Tank

To explore innovative approaches, technologies, and strategies to cure advanced cancers, the Stanford Cancer Institute hosted a group of nationally recognized cancer experts on the Stanford campus for a two-day think tank collaborative on April 3 and 4, 2024.

May 1, 2024 – Stanford Report

Stanford faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences

Seven Stanford researchers join the scholarly society.

April 24, 2024 – Stanford Medicine Children’s Health

Stanford Medicine Children’s Health Welcomes New Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplantation

Marc Melcher, MD, has been appointed the new Chief of the Division of Abdominal Transplantation at Stanford Medicine. In his new role, he oversees all aspects of abdominal transplant programs, including liver, kidney, and small bowel transplantation at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health.

April 18, 2024 – Stanford Report

Stanford faculty named AAAS Fellows

Seven Stanford faculty are among the 502 new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

April 15, 2024 – Stanford Cancer Institute

Stanford Scientists and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Identify Protein That Controls CAR-T Cell Longevity

Cancer scientists at Stanford and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) identified a protein, FOXO1, that improves the survival and function of CAR-T cells, which may lead to more effective CAR-T cell therapies and could potentially expand its use in difficult-to-treat cancers.

February 21, 2024 – Stanford News

A new RNA editing tool could enhance cancer treatment

The new study found that an RNA-targeting CRISPR platform could tune immune cell metabolism without permanent genetic changes, potentially unveiling a relatively low-risk way to upgrade existing cell therapies for cancer.

February 21, 2024 – SPARK Stanford

SPARK publishes manuscript in Nature Biotechnology

SPARK has published a paper in the journal Nature Biotechnology describing the unique community and methods the program has developed to address challenges in translating academic discoveries to medical products.

February 20, 2024 – Stanford HAI

In Cardiology Trial, Doctors Receptive to AI Collaboration

Doctors worked with a prototype AI assistant and adapted their diagnoses based on AI’s input, which led to better clinical decisions.

February 20, 2024 – Department of Medicine

A New Era of Cardiovascular Care: Insights from Dr. Joseph Wu

As we observe American Heart Month this February, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, shares his insights into the current state of cardiovascular medicine and what the future might hold for treating and preventing heart disease.

January 30, 2024 – Global Health

Equipping doctors to save lives when resources are scarce

Stanford Surgeon Sherry Wren’s International Humanitarian Surgical Skills Course, now in its tenth year at Stanford, has equipped hundreds of surgeons and healthcare providers with the unique skills and knowledge they need to save lives in conflict zones and low-resource settings.

January 16 – Stanford Report

IntroSem reveals the magic of medical imaging

An introductory seminar dives into the technologies behind the shadowy photos of anatomy that give clinicians a window into our most personal of spaces.

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