News & Research

  • William Weis dies at 64

    William Weis, PhD, former chair of structural biology at Stanford Medicine, refined advanced imaging techniques and described the three-dimensional structure of many cellular components.

  • Improved access to Stanford Hospital

    An extension of Blake Wilbur Drive between Sand Hill Road and Welch Road will provide better access to the emergency department as well as reduce congestion around the medical campus.

  • Alvin Hackel dies at 91

    The Stanford Medicine professor emeritus of anesthesiology and of pediatrics invented a transport incubator for newborns and helped establish pediatric anesthesiology as a specialty.

  • Cancer neuroscience discoveries give hope

    To drive their growth, many tumors hijack nervous system signals, including those needed for brain plasticity. Stanford Medicine discoveries are opening a promising new branch of oncology research.

  • Diet choices can lower carbon footprint

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues have identified simple food swaps that, if adopted universally, could reduce the nation’s food-related carbon footprint by more than a third. The changes are also more healthy.

  • African Americans less likely to be screened

    National guidelines for lung cancer screening are less effective for African Americans than for whites, Stanford study concludes. A risk-based analysis is more equitable and effective.

  • NPs, physicians equally safe at prescribing

    A study at Stanford Medicine has found that nurse practitioners prescribe as safely as primary care physicians while caring for seniors.

  • Lung cancer cells protected by brain cells

    Small cell lung cancers often metastasize to the brain. A Stanford Medicine study shows they thrive there by emulating developing neurons and recruiting surrounding cells for protection.

  • How ketamine treats depression

    In an unusual trial, Stanford Medicine researchers found that a patient’s belief that they had received ketamine, even if they didn’t, could improve their depression.

  • Eye fluid study may foster treatments

    Stanford Medicine researchers clock the age of cells to find new therapy targets.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care

Learn more about responsible AI in health and medicine


Other Stanford
Medicine News

April 18, 2024 – Stanford Report

Stanford faculty named AAAS Fellows

Seven Stanford faculty are among the 502 new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

April 15, 2024 – Stanford Cancer Institute

Stanford Scientists and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Identify Protein That Controls CAR-T Cell Longevity

Cancer scientists at Stanford and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) identified a protein, FOXO1, that improves the survival and function of CAR-T cells, which may lead to more effective CAR-T cell therapies and could potentially expand its use in difficult-to-treat cancers.

February 21, 2024 – Stanford News

A new RNA editing tool could enhance cancer treatment

The new study found that an RNA-targeting CRISPR platform could tune immune cell metabolism without permanent genetic changes, potentially unveiling a relatively low-risk way to upgrade existing cell therapies for cancer.

February 21, 2024 – SPARK Stanford

SPARK publishes manuscript in Nature Biotechnology

SPARK has published a paper in the journal Nature Biotechnology describing the unique community and methods the program has developed to address challenges in translating academic discoveries to medical products.

February 20, 2024 – Stanford HAI

In Cardiology Trial, Doctors Receptive to AI Collaboration

Doctors worked with a prototype AI assistant and adapted their diagnoses based on AI’s input, which led to better clinical decisions.

February 20, 2024 – Department of Medicine

A New Era of Cardiovascular Care: Insights from Dr. Joseph Wu

As we observe American Heart Month this February, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, shares his insights into the current state of cardiovascular medicine and what the future might hold for treating and preventing heart disease.

January 30, 2024 – Global Health

Equipping doctors to save lives when resources are scarce

Stanford Surgeon Sherry Wren’s International Humanitarian Surgical Skills Course, now in its tenth year at Stanford, has equipped hundreds of surgeons and healthcare providers with the unique skills and knowledge they need to save lives in conflict zones and low-resource settings.

January 16 – Stanford Report

IntroSem reveals the magic of medical imaging

An introductory seminar dives into the technologies behind the shadowy photos of anatomy that give clinicians a window into our most personal of spaces.

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