News & Research

  • Tumor DNA levels in blood predict outcome

    Circulating tumor DNA predicts recurrence and splits disease into two subgroups in Stanford Medicine-led study of Hodgkin lymphoma. New drug targets or changes in treatments may reduce toxicity.

  • Anatomical gift memorial service

    An event to commemorate body donations, “the priceless gift of generosity,” previously only open to faculty, staff and students, is now open to the donors’ loved ones.

  • Organs age at different rates

    A new study led by Stanford Medicine scientists demonstrates a simple way of studying organ aging by analyzing distinct proteins, or sets of them, in blood, enabling the prediction of individuals’ risk for diseases.

  • Human Neural Circuitry program

    Stanford Medicine’s Karl Deisseroth has created a super-charged, multidisciplinary in-patient research program and laboratory to better understand neuropsychiatric disorders — and share those discoveries with the world.

  • Richard Olshen dies at 81

    The Stanford Medicine professor was best known for his work in recursive partitioning, an aspect of machine learning.

  • New implants treat brain injuries

    A new technique using deep brain stimulation tailored to each patient exceeded researchers’ expectations in treating the cognitive impairments from moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

  • Vegan diet improves cardiovascular health

    A Stanford Medicine-led trial of identical twins comparing vegan and omnivore diets found that a vegan diet improves overall cardiovascular health.

  • Neural basis for “sunk cost” pride

    It may not be smart, but we value something more if we’ve put a lot of sweat equity into it. Neuroscientists may have figured out the biochemical basis of why.

  • Scar tissue predicts lifespan

    Pancreatic cancer is deadly, and its toll is growing. Scientists find that scar tissue around the tumor suggests how long a patient will live after diagnosis.

  • $10 million grant for maternal health

    The California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative receives funding to develop evidence-based strategies that address disparities in maternal health.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care

Learn more about responsible AI in health and medicine


Other Stanford
Medicine News

April 15, 2024 – Stanford Cancer Institute

Stanford Scientists and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Identify Protein That Controls CAR-T Cell Longevity

Cancer scientists at Stanford and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) identified a protein, FOXO1, that improves the survival and function of CAR-T cells, which may lead to more effective CAR-T cell therapies and could potentially expand its use in difficult-to-treat cancers.

February 21, 2024 – Stanford News

A new RNA editing tool could enhance cancer treatment

The new study found that an RNA-targeting CRISPR platform could tune immune cell metabolism without permanent genetic changes, potentially unveiling a relatively low-risk way to upgrade existing cell therapies for cancer.

February 21, 2024 – SPARK Stanford

SPARK publishes manuscript in Nature Biotechnology

SPARK has published a paper in the journal Nature Biotechnology describing the unique community and methods the program has developed to address challenges in translating academic discoveries to medical products.

February 20, 2024 – Stanford HAI

In Cardiology Trial, Doctors Receptive to AI Collaboration

Doctors worked with a prototype AI assistant and adapted their diagnoses based on AI’s input, which led to better clinical decisions.

February 20, 2024 – Department of Medicine

A New Era of Cardiovascular Care: Insights from Dr. Joseph Wu

As we observe American Heart Month this February, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, shares his insights into the current state of cardiovascular medicine and what the future might hold for treating and preventing heart disease.

January 30, 2024 – Global Health

Equipping doctors to save lives when resources are scarce

Stanford Surgeon Sherry Wren’s International Humanitarian Surgical Skills Course, now in its tenth year at Stanford, has equipped hundreds of surgeons and healthcare providers with the unique skills and knowledge they need to save lives in conflict zones and low-resource settings.

January 16 – Stanford Report

IntroSem reveals the magic of medical imaging

An introductory seminar dives into the technologies behind the shadowy photos of anatomy that give clinicians a window into our most personal of spaces.

Featured Topics