News & Research

  • Kids exposed to lead in water

    Researchers at Stanford Medicine and Johns Hopkins University estimate that some 129,000 children younger than 6 in Chicago have elevated levels of the neurotoxin in their blood due to lead pipes.

  • Drug ups production of anti-hunger molecule

    A Stanford Medicine study found that metformin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug associated with moderate weight loss, stimulates production of lac-phe, a molecule abundant after exercise.

  • Pugh a fellow at Joint Commission

    The Joint Commission, which accredits more than 22,000 health care organizations, awarded surgeon Carla Pugh the inaugural fellowship, during which she plans to develop a technology-driven process to support the organization’s work.

  • Microbiomes are personal

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues tracked the gut, mouth, nose and skin bacteria of 86 people for as long as six years to try to gauge what constitutes a healthy microbiome.

  • AI helps with clinical notes

    Stanford Medicine integrates AI-powered listening technology that takes notes for health care providers, allowing them to spend more time with patients and less time on administrative tasks.

  • Alistair Philip dies at 86

    Alistair Philip, professor emeritus of pediatrics, pioneered a test to reduce antibiotic use in newborns, streamlined nursery care at several hospitals and devoted his life to educating others in his field.

  • Who needs regular COVID-19 boosters?

    A study led by researchers at Stanford Medicine finds the benefit of frequent booster vaccination for COVID-19 is highest for those over 65 years and the immunocompromised.

  • Bill Marshall dies at 92

    The Stanford Medicine professor was well known as a mentor and teacher, as well as for his expertise in neuroradiology.

  • Digital health's future

    Digital Health 2024 drew more than 200 attendees to hear from dozens of speakers on a range of topics at the intersection of health and digital technology.

  • Augmented reality in the OR

    Stanford Medicine physician uses augmented reality to streamline data visualization during surgery.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care

Learn more about responsible AI in health and medicine


Other Stanford
Medicine News

February 21, 2024 – Stanford News

A new RNA editing tool could enhance cancer treatment

The new study found that an RNA-targeting CRISPR platform could tune immune cell metabolism without permanent genetic changes, potentially unveiling a relatively low-risk way to upgrade existing cell therapies for cancer.

February 21, 2024 – SPARK Stanford

SPARK publishes manuscript in Nature Biotechnology

SPARK has published a paper in the journal Nature Biotechnology describing the unique community and methods the program has developed to address challenges in translating academic discoveries to medical products.

February 20, 2024 – Stanford HAI

In Cardiology Trial, Doctors Receptive to AI Collaboration

Doctors worked with a prototype AI assistant and adapted their diagnoses based on AI’s input, which led to better clinical decisions.

February 20, 2024 – Department of Medicine

A New Era of Cardiovascular Care: Insights from Dr. Joseph Wu

As we observe American Heart Month this February, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, shares his insights into the current state of cardiovascular medicine and what the future might hold for treating and preventing heart disease.

January 30, 2024 – Global Health

Equipping doctors to save lives when resources are scarce

Stanford Surgeon Sherry Wren’s International Humanitarian Surgical Skills Course, now in its tenth year at Stanford, has equipped hundreds of surgeons and healthcare providers with the unique skills and knowledge they need to save lives in conflict zones and low-resource settings.

January 16 – Stanford Report

IntroSem reveals the magic of medical imaging

An introductory seminar dives into the technologies behind the shadowy photos of anatomy that give clinicians a window into our most personal of spaces.

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