News & Research

  • Leaders pledge to address climate change

    A roundtable at the White House on reducing the health care industry’s climate-warming emissions includes leaders from Stanford Medicine.

  • Awards for COVID-19 project, media work

    A COVID-19 remembrance project, two videos, an article about bad brain cells and Stanford Medicine magazine have been recognized by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

  • Improving clinical trial diversity

    The American Heart Association has provided funding to two Stanford Medicine professors to develop ways to diversify enrollment in heart disease clinical trials.

  • Gummy phlegm and COVID-19

    Levels of a stringy, spongy substance soar in the sputum of COVID-19 patients requiring intubation, accounting for at least some of their breathing trouble. Development of an off-patent drug may prevent it.

  • Stanford Medicine provides monkeypox test

    Stanford Medicine now provides a test for the monkeypox virus. Rapid identification of infected people will help combat the virus’s spread and facilitate patient care.

  • COVID vaccine approved for young kids

    Children as young as 6 months can now receive the Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna mRNA vaccines.

  • Immunosuppression-free kidney transplant

    Using a method they developed for stem cell transplants, a Stanford team has enabled children with immune disorders to receive a new immune system and a matching kidney from a parent.

  • $13 million for cancer research

    The funding, from Cancer Grand Challenges, will help the researchers address difficult problems in cancer prevention, treatment-resistant cancers and therapies for pediatric solid tumors.

  • ‘Anti-hunger’ molecule discovered

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their collaborators have identified a molecule that staves off hunger post-exercise.

  • Jeffrey Glenn receives $69 million grant

    Stanford Medicine’s SyneRx will develop drugs to fight viral pathogens with high pandemic potential, including the one that causes COVID-19.

  • 1,000+genes linked to severe COVID-19

    Using machine learning, researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators found specific genetic signals in people who develop severe coronavirus infection.

  • COVID-19 brain fog similar to chemo brain

    Researchers found that damage to the brain’s white matter after COVID-19 resembles that seen after cancer chemotherapy, raising hope for treatments to help both conditions.


2022 ISSUE 1

Understanding the world within us

Stanford Medicine's blog about health, medicine, science & innovators


Other Stanford
Medicine News

  • – Department of
    Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Assessing bias in patient safety reporting systems

    Researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine find that bias may be present in patient safety reporting systems, a method for reporting incidents related to medical errors that can result in harm to patients.

  • – Global Health

    Michele Barry on Preventing Pandemics

    “Epidemics are inevitable, but pandemics are preventable,” said Michele Barry, MD, director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health. She sees this moment of global awareness and interest in pandemics as an opportunity to catalyze innovation and build better prepared, more equitable health systems.


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