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Welcome to the Stanford Department of Neurosurgery

Comprised of 60 neurosurgeons and research faculty, and performing over 4000 neurosurgical operations covering the full spectrum of neurological conditions every year, we are consistently ranked among the best centers in the nation for neurosurgery. We are fortunate to have excellent facilities and the most technologically advanced equipment in the world to help us treat neurological diseases for both adult and pediatric patients. In addition, our hospitals offer the only Level 1 Trauma Center between San Francisco and San Jose, and our Stroke Center was the first in the nation to be certified as a comprehensive Stroke Center by The Joint Commission. These certifications recognize our hospitals as having state-of-the-art equipment, infrastructure, staffing and training to diagnose and treat patients with the most severe and complex cases. Together, we are driving forward the most innovative technologies in neurosurgery – from cutting-edge neuroscience research and clinical trials to the widespread clinical implementation of our discoveries.

Stanford Neurosurgery News

Making a comeback

In the past few decades, researchers have devised methods to manipulate the brain and central nervous system to help the paralyzed move and enable the blind to see, and they’re moving closer to restoring lost cognitive abilities.


Same injury, different brain

Five years ago, Odette Harris, MD, professor of neurosurgery and a brain trauma expert, began to weave an age-old question into her research: What are the differences between men and women?


Good vibrations: Can Parkinson’s symptoms be stopped?


Kanwarjit Bhutani stepped out of an elevator with his wife, unaware his life was about to change. A woman had followed the couple and, out of the blue, recommended that Bhutani see Stanford Medicine researcher Peter Tass, MD, PhD, about his promising treatment for Parkinson’s — a vibrating glove.


Women Of Stanford Neurosurgery

Meet our women physicians and scientists and read about their experiences as females in science and medicine, in this Q&A series.