Faculty

Dr. Anand completed her residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital before coming to Stanford for her nephrology fellowship.  She has remained on faculty at Stanford.  Her research interests are focused on the management of CKD and ESRD in developing, resource-poor areas, including India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Dr. Chang completed her MD at the University of Michigan and her internal medicine residency at the University of California, San Francisco.  She completed her fellowship and clinical research training at Stanford University, where she remains on faculty as an Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Resesarch in the Division of Nephrology.   More Dr. Chang's research focuses on finding ways to reduce some of the evidence gaps regarding cardiovascular care in patients with kidney disease to ultimately improve outcomes. Specifically, she is interested in comparing the effectiveness of therapies for hypertension, coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial disease in people with kidney disease.  She is also involved in clinical trials, most recently as a site-PI for the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervension Trial (SPRINT).

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Dr. Chertow arrived at Stanford in 2007 as Chief of the Nephrology Division.  He has received numerous awards for excellence in patient care, teaching, mentoring and research.  His clinical research interests are in clinical epidemiology, health services research, decision sciences and clinical trials.

Dr. Kurella Tamura is a clinical and health services investigator whose primary interest is in improving the quality of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) care among older adults. Her current work aims to describe outcomes (especially geriatric outcomes) in older patients and to compare the effectiveness of different ESRD management strategies.

Dr. Lafayette completed his fellowship at Stanford University and has been on faculty for many years. He is the director of the Stanford Glomerular Disease Center.  His current research is focused on developing a glomerulonephritis cohort study, including immunologic characterization. He has also completed interventional studies of preeclampsia exploring the nitric oxide, endothelin system and effects on glomerular function and morphometry. More  Dr. Lafayette's group continues to recruit patients for treatment and observational studies of glomerular disease, including FSGS, membranous and particularly IgA nephropathy. He is also actively studying renal disease in systemic amyloidosis.

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Dr. Lenihan trained in Ireland before completing fellowships in nephrology and transplant nephrology at Stanford. He joined the Stanford faculty in 2015. His research focuses on issues related to kidney transplantation and living kidney donation.

Throughout her career, Dr. Leonard has devoted the majority of her effort to patient oriented research and mentoring junior investigators. Her overarching goal is to lead a vibrant, multidisciplinary, innovative research program that attracts new trainees to clinical research, serves as a launching pad for junior investigators, and improves bone health, nutrition, and clinical outcomes in children and adults with chronic disease. More  Her multidisciplinary research program is primarily focused on the impact of chronic diseases on bone metabolism and nutrition, with an emphasis on changes in body composition and skeletal density and structure during growth and aging, and in the context of inflammatory diseases, chronic kidney disease, glucocorticoid therapy, and bone marrow transplantation. She has identified unique windows of vulnerability for impaired bone accrual during early puberty, with a consequent detrimental impact on peak bone mass and likely implications for life long skeletal health and fracture risk.

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Jonathan Maltzman, MD-PhD, FAST
Associate Professor of Medicine
Director of Basic Research, Nephrology

My laboratory has a longstanding interest in understanding fundamental aspects of immunological memory and regulation and their relationship to solid organ transplantation and cancer. I have been an independent investigator for a period of 9 years since completing my clinical training in Nephrology and post-doctoral training in Immunology and as an Instructor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. More  

Dr. Meyer received his MD at Harvard University and completed his residency and fellowship there before joining the Stanford facullty in 1984. He is primarly based at the VA medical center in Palo Alto. His research focuses on identification of uremic solutes in patients with end-stage renal disease, and ways to improve treatment for these patients.

Dr. Rhee holds a dual doctoral degree from Harvard University and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford. She is a diabetes epidemiologist and health services investigator whose research focuses on comparative effectiveness of diabetes treatments in patients with chronic kidney disease, dietary modification for diabetes, and racial and ethnic differences in cardiometabolic disease risk factors and outcomes. 

Tammy Sirich, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

Tammy L. Sirich is an instructor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology. She graduated from UC Berkeley with a bachelor's of science in chemistry. During her undergraduate time, she worked in an analytical chemistry research lab that specialized in mass spectrometry. She completed medical school at UC San Diego and internal medicine training at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center.  More Dr. Sirich completed nephrology fellowship training at Stanford University. During her training, she conducted research under the mentorship of Dr. Timothy Meyer, studying uremic solutes using mass spectrometry. She received a Career Development Award from the Veterans Affairs Research program. She continues to study the role of uremic solutes in kidney failure using novel techniques of mass spectrometry.

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Dr. Tan is a Professor of Medicine. She holds degrees with honors in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University, received her MD and PhD from University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, and completed her Internal Medicine and Nephrology training at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston MA. Dr. Tan joined the Division of Nephrology at Stanford University in 2000 and has had more than 15 years of experience as a Transplant Nephrologist.  More She served as Interim Medical Director of Adult Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation in 2015 and now serves as Clinical Director of the Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program. Her academic interests focus on aging and senescence in kidney transplantation. She has conducted NIH-funded studies in organs from older deceased and living donors. She received a Masters degree in Epidemiology at Stanford University in 2014 and serves on national committees on transplant nephrology and living donor education policy

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Our research aims to improve the global quality of care for patients with Urologic conditions, with a particular focus on kidney cancer. We are evaluating the comparative effectiveness of various kidney cancer surgeries and their impact on chronic kidney disease and its downstream effects.

Biostatisticians

Maria Emilia Montez Rath, PhD
Director of the Biostatistics Core
Biostatistician

Dr. Montez-Rath completed her PhD in Biostatistics from Boston University in 2008 focusing on methods for modeling interaction effects. She has been working as a biostatistician in the Division of Nephrology at Stanford University since 2010 where she collaborates with numerous clinical investigators to study a variety of research questions relevant to kidney disease.  More Her methodological interests are mainly data-driven and much of her research involves data collected from the USRDS Database, a rich data source describing all end stage renal disease patients in the United States. She is also currently a co-investigator on a PCORI-funded project entitled “The Handling of Missing Data Induced by Time-Varying Covariates in Comparative Effectiveness Research Involving HIV Patients.” Besides missing data, her statistical interests focus on methods for analyzing epidemiologic studies, analysis of survival type outcomes, analysis of correlated data and comparative effectiveness studies.

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Colin (Jialin) Han, MS
Biostatistician

Colin (Jialin) is Biostatistician in Division of Nephrology at Stanford University, he completed his MS degree in Biostatistics at University of Connecticut and then worked for General Dynamic as a Data Analyst in health division, where he assisted in the statistical analysis of large volumes of medical claims data from CMS and PCMH.  More At Stanford, his primary duty include consulting with faculty and investigator on study design, statistical programming to implement analytic plans, using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) and HCUP Kid’s Inpatient Database (KID) and OPTUM Data on kidney research projects. His statistical interests focus on methods for analyzing epidemiologic studies, Bayesian statistics and clinical trials study.

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Sai Liu, MS
Biostatistician

Sai is Biostatistician in Division of Nephrology at Stanford University. She completed her MPH degree in Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Southern California (USC). She then worked at Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy Obesity as a Biostatistician,  More conducting quantitative and qualitative analyses to examine the extent and impact of exposure to food marketing and weight bias in healthcare. At Stanford, her primary projects include working on the 2016 United States Renal Data System (USRDS) Annual Data Report and analyses of clinical epidemiology, health service and survival outcomes relevant to renal disease using the USRDS and the National Inpatient Sample (NIS). Her statistical interests focus on methods for analyzing missing data, statistical computing, health outcomes and clinical trials.

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Margaret Stedman, PhD
Biostatistician

Dr. Margaret Stedman joined the Nephrology division in 2015.  She has been collaborating on projects related to the allocation of kidney transplant using the  SRTR and STRIDE databases. Prior to coming to Stanford she completed her PhD in Biostatistics from Boston University in 2009, where she focused on methods for analyzing cluster randomized trials of academic detailing interventions.   More This research was motivated by her work as a supporting statistician in the Division of Pharaco-epidemiology and Pharmaco-economics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In 2010 she received at T-32 award from Harvard University to investigate competing risk in total hip replacement. Upon completing her T32, she became a program director and statistician for the Surveillance Research Program at the National Cancer Institute where she worked on survival measures for the SEER registry data and managed a portfolio of grants including the CISNET cooperative agreement. Her research interests are broadly in the application of statistical methods for healthcare data, with particular interest in survival analysis, and nonparametric statistics. In her spare time she enjoys playing with her 2 small children, gardening, and hiking in the great outdoors.

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