Current Fellows

Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine (ACCM)

Robert Arrigo (278)
Dates: 8/20 - 7/31
Specialty: Anesthesia

Why did you choose Stanford?
I was seeking a program offering complex, critically-ill patients, the full-spectrum of specialty services and a collaborative approach to patient care—all of which Stanford offers. Additionally, academic output and research opportunities abound here, and living in the Bay Area is a pleasure.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Rotating on Green Team as they manage medical and especially sick heme-onc patients surviving on a knife edge—it is excellent training.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I enjoy fast-paced, high-stakes medicine with frequent procedures and a team-based approach to patient care. The occasional unexpected save solidifies it: this is a fun and rewarding job.


Michael Chen (275)
Dates: 8/20 - 7/21
Specialty: Anesthesia

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
Stanford Anesthesia (#stanesthesia) prioritizes diversity, innovation, housestaff wellness, flexibility, and collaboration. Cases are complex and challenging, with a great balance between autonomy and supervision when needed. The decision to stick around after residency was a no-brainer.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Managing critically ill patients in the CVICU with a multidisciplinary team of cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, intensivists, perfusionists, nurses, and pharmacists allows for things like intrapulmonary artery balloon pumps!
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Anesthesiologists must step up as peri-operative experts that patients and surgeons can rely on for providing high quality care from start to finish. Another chance to improve on more advanced TTE and TEE skills.


Jonathan Weimer (274)
Dates: 8/20 - 7/21
Specialty: Anesthesia

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
Stanford offers a world-class experience for a combined critical care and cardiac anesthesia training program.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
CVICU, which has an incredible volume of MCS and post-op transplant patients. You'll work daily alongside an incredible team of staff members, APPs, senior residents, pharmacists, RTs, and nurses.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
It's a true multidisciplinary specialty, and the variety of the backgrounds from your colleagues at Stanford really shines through.


Tiffany Lee (276)
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Anesthesia

Why did you choose Stanford?
I completed my anesthesia/internal medicine residency at Stanford and really enjoyed my time here. It is an amazing place to live and there is plenty of outdoor stuff to do, even in the time of COVID. Weather is unbeatable.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
To be determined since I have much of the year left to go… but the CVICU and MICU have both been great learning experiences for me. There is such a diverse group of fellows at Stanford from a variety of subspecialty backgrounds that I have learned so much from each of my co-fellows and being on service with them (night or day!) has been one of the best parts of fellowship.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Critical Care gives me the opportunity to have greater continuity with patients and their families. Though I love being in the OR, the camaraderie of working on multidisciplinary teams can be quite rewarding as well.


Miguel Teixeira (273)
Dates: 8/20 - 7/21
Specialty: Anesthesia

Why did you choose Stanford?
Appealing location. Multidisciplinary CCM training with strong MICU backbone and diverse ICU experiences.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Phone Triage—a new challenge amidst the hospital always awaits: whether it be pathology, goals of care, planning for disposition, prioritizing resources, resolving diagnostic dilemmas, providing reassurance, or acute resuscitation. I enjoy consults and providing direction and guidance while learning from our amazing crisis team.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
From the very start of my medical training I felt like the most interesting patients of every medical and surgical subspecialty were those critically ill.

I like the ownership of a primary service, but enjoy the breadth of pathologies and the collaboration with specialties in the ICU. I enjoy procedures, but like to balance that with the more cerebral aspect of managing a complex patient. I love working and learning along with competent nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists surgeons, and other specialists. The process of resuscitation with its acuity, intense human interactions and need to anticipate the next steps is satisfying. Critical care is the best of internal medicine and anesthesiology in one field.


Alberto Furzan (270)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Anesthesia

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I wanted a program with an expert team of faculty and a diverse curriculum to fit my goals while also maintaining a well-balanced personal life outside the hospital.
Stanford have a strong tradition in research, commitment to mentorship, a strong presence in medical societies, and it offers tools for leadership, diversity, and medical education that are unique in the country.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
The CVICU because it has a wide variety of cardiovascular pathologies, surgical procedures, and mechanical circulatory support devices, enhancing my understanding of physiology when stretched to its limits.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I like critical care because of the complexity of the patients that require you to be updated on diseases and treatments. I enjoy the interaction with multiple specialties, and patients and their families. As I am planning to do a fellowship in cardiac anesthesia, I believe critical care will help me to develop a more comprehensive care plan than just safely administer an anesthetic.


Jason Leong (277)
Dates: 8/20 - 7/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Anesthesia

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose Stanford for the outstanding clinical experience and professional mentorship. Stanford has alumni that have done everything from academics to private practice and knowing that I'd be prepared for anything once I was done was really important to me.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
My favorite rotation is the CVICU and MICU experiences. They are vastly different in terms of patient population, acuity, and structure, but they are both endearing in their own ways.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Being able to care for patients and their families in what can be the most stressful periods of their lives is an absolute privilege. Many times there are difficult questions to be answered, like what makes their life important, or, unfortunately, sometimes even how they would like to die. While at times it is exhausting, it is always fulfilling.


Emergency Medicine Critical Care Medicine (EM CCM)

Blair Bigham (282)
Dates: 8/20 - 7/22
Specialty: Emergency Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
The fellowship at Stanford has an awesome mix of specialities intereacting together. My peers come from cardiology, neurology, nephrology, anesthesia, respirology and more... whenever we hang out, we learn from each other's strengths; this makes us better generalists and stronger ICU specialists. Outside of the fellowship, Stanford has an incredible medical humanities program; there are lots of opportunities for an aspiring writer like me to find friends and mentors in storytelling, journalism and writing. Plus... I live in California now, so I sold my snow shovel.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
I think I'm happy on any rotation, but happiest overnight. I love the camaraderie on night shifts. Everyone buckles down and supports each other to get through the shift, and the most interesting emergencies occur during a full moon!
Why Critical Care Medicine?
As a specialist in emergency medicine, I get to see a little bit of everyone else's sickest patients, but only for a short period of time. By extending my relationship with patients into the ICU, I increase my longitudinal involvement with cases and derive satisfaction from building stronger bonds with families and seeing the often slow progression patients experience on their route to good health. As an ER doc, everyone looks so sick, and it's easy to get fatalistic. But in the ICU, you see those "futile" cases make small improvements and eventually recover their organ function.


Jason Block (263)
Dates: 8/19 - 7/21
Specialty: Emergency Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose Stanford for the multidisciplinary critical care fellowship with mentorship and an alumni network that will help you get to wherever you hope to go. This is set in a place where you can be skiing in Tahoe, hiking in Yosemite, and walking the beach in Half Moon Bay all in the same week.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
CVICU for the pure physiology and mechanical circulatory support.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
To care for a huge breadth of patients with and learning to master interventions ranging from resuscitation to palliation.


June Gordon (248)
Dates: 1/19 – 12/20
Specialty: Emergency Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
The multidisciplinary care and the role the fellows play in the hospital.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Stanford MSICU—it's busy, fun, and the pathology is fantastic!
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Because I love it!! I love the teamwork, the physiology, the challenge, the patients and their families.


Kevin Gardner (279)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/22
Specialty: Emergency Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
Excellent training with a great group of fellows, faculty, and staff. The large and diverse cohort of fellows is one of my favorite aspects of the program. Outside the hospital, the Bay Area is a great place to live with the ocean, mountains, and wine country all within a few hours drive.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
MICU at Stanford - great people to work with and exposure to a wide variety of critical care pathology.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
The unique combination of interesting/challenging pathology with the chance to form very meaningful relationships with patients and their families is some of their most challenging moments.


Bryant Shannon (280)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/22
Specialty: Emergency Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
Large diverse group of fellows and attendings with different backgrounds to learn from. Many opportunities for fellows related to teaching, research, QI, etc.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
MSICU - its the core experience of the fellowship. You work with great nurses and residents, taking care of patients with very unique pathology. Fellows serve in many different roles: triaging, seeing consults, running codes, leading rounds, etc. Its where the most growth occurs as an intensivist in training.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I enjoy caring for sick patients with interesting physiology, working with families to deliver consistent with patient's wishes, seeing them progress day after day, constantly learning new things, doing essential procedures, teaching trainees, running resuscitations, and managing airways.


Susannah Empson (283)
Dates: 8/20 - 7/22
Specialty: Emergency Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose Stanford for the integrated nature of its program. It is incredible to be able to train alongside and learn from physicians from such a variety of specialties and backgrounds. The learning opportunities are endless.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
It's only month 3, but there hasn't been a rotation I haven't loved...
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Management of critically ill patients has always been my favorite aspect of Emergency Medicine, and the opportunity to develop longitudinal relationships with patients and their families exists in critical care medicine in ways that it does not in the Emergency Department.


Erica Chimelski (281)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/22
Specialty: Emergency Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
The multidisciplinary nature of the CCM program at Stanford allows you to benefit from the varying expertise of your colleagues who come from diverse training backgrounds. As a resident at Stanford, I was always impressed with the caliber of fellow the program attracts as well as the breadth of training fellows receive.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
So far, I have really enjoyed my Stanford MSICU blocks. I feel that I have a true fellow role, an appropriate amount of autonomy, and care for a diverse and sick patient population.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I like providing critical care across the spectrum of critically ill patients from the ED to the ICU. While I always found the initial resuscitation of patients with undifferentiated pathology in the ED rewarding, I enjoy the broader medical practice, deeper understanding of physiology, and more extended time with patients afforded by specialization in CCM.


Internal Medicine Critical Care Medicine (IM CCM)

Barinder "Ricky" Hansra (265)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Cardiology

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
Stanford offers its fellows to rotate through various intensive care settings to help its trainees grow as providers. All of the faculty are very supportive of our clinical interests and are more than willing to help us succeed.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
CVICU! I love working with post operative cardiac patients. The acuity is very high, the hemodynamics are fascinating, and it's incredibly rewarding to care for these patients.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Having trained in cardiology prior to coming to Stanford, I wanted to get a more in-depth training in the critical care arena in order to better be able to become an attending in a cardiac critical care unit and cardiothoracic surgical ICU.


Raymond Pashun (268)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Cardiology

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose to train at Stanford for the opportunity to provide the most advanced care to the sickest patients in an environment alongside colleagues with backgrounds in emergency medicine, anesthesia and pulmonary/critical care medicine specialists.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
My favorite rotation is the Cardiovascular ICU as it provides the challenge and satisfaction of caring for cardiac patients on mechanical circulatory support.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I chose Critical Care Medicine to further enhance my cardiology training and better prepare me for a career caring for patients in complex cardiogenic shock states involving advanced mechanical circulatory support.


Erum Malik (267)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Nephrology

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose Stanford because of the multidisciplinary critical care teams that I get to work with, where the diverse background trainings of my co-fellows offer a unique and exciting peer-to-peer learning opportunity, along with an exposure to critical care faculty from various training and practice backgrounds. In addition I find the program structure to be impressive and thoughtfully designed, and I particularly like the focus and support for fellows' tailored goals for their training.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
My favorite rotation is MICU - green, primarily because of the decision making challenges and level of acuity seen especially in our oncology patients, I enjoy working with and learning from the various consulting teams that are often involved in the care of these medically complex patients
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Critical care medicine offers the opportunity to manage acute deteriorations in life threatening situations. I enjoy dealing with a broad range of clinical problems, and making challenging medical decisions in high acuity situations. In addition, I like working with a team of residents and medical students, that offers opportunities to educate them on important diagnostic and management concepts and highlight challenges in the care of medically complex patients.


Camilo Cortesi (264)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Nephrology

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose Stanford because of its world renowned medical institution with some of the best clinicians and researchers in many fields. I was very excited about how ultrasound oriented this fellowship is and since that is one of my passions, I was eager to be part of this. As a Stanford trainee, you get exposure to all the different clinical settings that you can encounter as a critical care physician.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Although I am only a few months into my fellowship I can say that I have loved working nights in the MICU. Most recently I really enjoyed the SICU rotation where I had the opportunity to manage very critical patients and perform a lot of procedures.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I love the rush working in the ICU, I work begetter under pressure while always expecting the unexpected to happen along with managing challenging cases. I feel motivated every day to see how years of training turn into managing life threatening conditions and making impactful changes on my patients’ health and their families. I love the team work needed to be effective in the ICU and learning something new from my team members every day. This is a subspecialty where you can have a vast group people from various different backgrounds and it’s always truly fascinating how much you end up learning from each other.


Daniel Gerber (269)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Cardiology

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I have spent the past 7 years training at Stanford through internal medicine residency, cardiovascular medicine fellowship, and now critical care fellowship. Stanford is particularly well-suited for this pursuit as a high-volume heart failure, mechanical circulatory support, and heart transplant center..
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Months rotating in Stanford's cardiac ICU and cardiothoracic surgical ICU have been some of the most exciting and rewarding of my training.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I chose the CCM fellowship in preparation for an academic career with a clinical and research focus in optimizing the delivery of cardiac intensive care.


Sylvan Cox (260)
Dates: 7/19 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose Stanford for the integrated nature of its program. It is incredible to be able to train alongside and learn from Its a fantastic program overall, is made up of fellows from various backgrounds with different skill sets we can teach each other, and it is in an unbelievably beautiful location.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
CVICU is always a thoroughly stimulating learning environment with ample opportunities to learn about mechanical support.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
I could not imagine a more engaging specialty. It is high impact care with plenty of procedural opportunities, point of care ultrasound, and applying basic physiology to resuscitate and treat our patients. Furthermore, the responsibility to guide and support our patient's and their families through what may be some of the most difficult times in their lives is often challenging, but is highly rewarding and meaningful.


James Mitchell, MD (261)
Dates: 7/19 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
The quality of training, people, and quality of life.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
I enjoy the MICU, I am always fascinated by the constant pathology and diversity of patients we care for on a daily basis.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Critical Care combines science, heart, and passion to deliver the care the sickest patient needs. Working with an amazing team of providers, nurses, and support staff amazing things are possible.


Xavier Jimenez Samayoa (266)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Internal Medicine/Infectious Disease

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
Stanford Hospital is a world-renowned institution which offers unique learning opportunities for fellows and superb clinical mentorship from top-notch faculty.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Stanford MSICU because of the training opportunities that the rotation has to offer and the outstanding faculty I get to work with. 
Why Critical Care Medicine?
As an infectious disease trained physician, I wanted to train in Critical Care Medicine as these two specialties have strong potential for synergy in patient care, clinical and epidemiological research. My goal is to become a well-rounded intensivist with an expertise in infectious diseases, and to participate in collaborative research focus on sepsis, hospital-acquired infections, and antimicrobial stewardship.


Neuro Critical Care (NCC)

Varun Shah (272)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Neurology

 

Why did you choose Stanford?
Stanford Critical Care Medicine program is one of its kind in successfully amalgamating trainees from diverse backgrounds - Neurology, Anesthesia, Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Pulmonary / Critical Care and Emergency Medicine. Having done a Neurology residency, my prime interest was to learn the fundamental concepts of critical care medicine that would empower me to take care of critically ill neurology patients. I believe Stanford is a unique place where a Neurocritical Care fellow is trained at par with the fellows from other critical care medicine fields. Having colleagues from these different fields has certainly helps active knowledge sharing, discussions and debates that broadens one's understanding of the science behind our daily clinical practice. I think there is a robust infrastructure and a highly progressive environment here at Stanford that helps support such a training.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
Neurocritical Care—I think I am biased! Neurocritical Care at Stanford is a great rotation. It is an extremely productive clinical rotation with a good patient volume. Stanford ICU sees a good mix of ischemic strokes, hemorrhages, subarachnoids, neurotraumas, neuromuscular pathologies and status epilepticus. Additionally, exposure to tele stroke is just an icing on the cake. You get to work with a team of very experienced APPs and Neurology Residents while on this rotation. It is a fun rotation to lead, to teach and to read more about Neurocritical Care!
Why Critical Care Medicine?
Critical Care Medicine is the last frontier of medicine. It not only involves taking care of medically complex and extremely sick individuals with multi-organ dysfunction, but also provides an opportunity to take a more holistic approach to patient care - from advanced interventions and procedures to respecting patient's wishes/beliefs, end-of-life care, palliation and comfort care. .


Spencer J. Craven (271)
Dates: 7/20 - 6/21
Specialty: Neurology

Why did you choose Stanford?
I chose Stanford because it strikes a good balance between full critical care training as well as subspecialty neurology training within critical care. Having met Stanford-trained faculty during my residency program, I knew that training here would leave me well-prepared to manage patients independently, able to confidently perform a wide variety of procedures and manage complex patients. I also chose Stanford because the culture of the program was reputed to be both hard working and very friendly, which has proven to be true.
What’s your favorite rotation, and why?
My favorite rotation thus far has been NCC. I love Neurology and have enjoyed talking directly with some of the most innovative people in the field of neurocritical care and stroke. The MICU and NCC attending both have been very supportive in teaching new procedures, or refining procedures I'm already comfortable with, or showing new approaches. It's very gratifying to focus directly on the kind of patient care that I anticipate providing throughout my career. The faculty here reward curiosity, and will selflessly take time to give directly tailored instruction or training, even when their service is busy.
Why Critical Care Medicine?
In critical care medicine, my work feels meaningful. I enjoy helping patients and their families to navigate through difficult experiences in their lives. I find great satisfaction in performing short procedures to diagnose and treat my patients. Another aspect I have grown to enjoy here is the excellent imaging and echo training here. It is very empowering to use point-of-care ultrasonography to make real-time treatment decisions.