Latest information on COVID-19


Faculty Mentoring

Connecting Mentors and Mentees with Tools, Opportunities, and Training


What is Mentoring?

Mentoring is a collaborative relationship with a defined, mutually agreed upon purpose. Mentors are commonly understood to fulfill two functions: career assistance, to enhance learning the ropes and preparing for academic success and promotion; and psychosocial support, to  enhance a sense of competence, belonging at Stanford, clarity of identity, and self-efficacy.

These two functions often stem from different roots and satisfy different outcomes. Faculty mentors serve many roles and no one mentor fits all possible roles.  Many faculty mentoring activities at Stanford occur through these multiple roles, in addition to formal programs and group mentoring.

This website is for Stanford faculty mentors and mentees.

We highlight practices, evidence, suggestions, and programs that facilitate effective mentoring experiences, in order to support and advance faculty success at the Stanford School of Medicine. 


Faculty Peer Mentoring Program

Mentoring groups allow for consultation and sharing of perspective that can foster new collegial relationships, career planning, skills development and lead to opportunities to meet faculty from other departments or fields. Effective peer mentor groups often form around a particular goal—for example, to offer support, guidance or feedback on a research topic or skill, clinical practice, advising and mentoring of trainees, teaching skills, and also on topics related to work-life balance and integration, career directions, priorities, navigating Stanford, preparing for the promotion process, or support for faculty who are in formal leadership positions for the first time.  These groups are meant to enhance the experience of early-career support and not a substitute for the mentoring taking place in the department or the assigned senior mentor.