Otolaryngology

Otolaryngology

At Stanford Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery the goal is to provide the highest possible care for all ENT issues and for complex and technically challenging disorders in the head and neck region. The ENT physicians possess specialized expertise, use innovative techniques and collaborate closely with one another, to provide the best possible care.


Otolaryngology & Stanford Medicine News

  • Black boxes in operating rooms

    High-tech monitoring system, inspired by the aviation industry, is designed to capture what’s happening during surgical procedures to improve training and promote a culture of safety.

  • Lab coat ceremony for new PhD students

    Biosciences PhD students began their careers at Stanford School of Medicine with crisp new lab coats, advice on graduate school success and warm words about the value of discovery.

  • Hodgkin lymphoma pioneer Rosenberg dies

    Rosenberg combined radiation and chemotherapy to treat Hodgkin lymphoma, revolutionizing cancer care. He taught at Stanford Medicine for more than 50 years.

  • Antivirals may benefit some inpatients

    Elevated virus levels in hospitalized COVID-19 patients’ blood predicts worsening respiratory symptoms and suggests ongoing viral replication in later disease stages, Stanford Medicine-led study says.

  • Humphreys wins queen’s award

    The Stanford Medicine professor, internationally known for his research on addiction treatment and contributions to public policy, also received an award from the Veterans Administration.

  • $10 million for autism, sleep research

    About 80% of children with autism have trouble sleeping, but whether better sleep could lessen other autism symptoms is unknown. A new grant will help Stanford Medicine scientists find out.

  • COVID-19 virus can infect fat tissue

    Stanford Medicine scientists’ findings could explain why obese people have a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and are more likely to progress to severe disease and die of infection.

  • Mignot wins life sciences Breakthrough Prize

    The Stanford Medicine sleep researcher is honored for discovering the role of orexins in narcolepsy and paving the way to new sleep disorder therapies.

  • Awards honor research, diversity efforts

    Al’ai Alvarez, MD, receives the inaugural John Levin Excellence in Leadership Award; two others are honored by Stanford Health Care Board of Directors for their roles advancing research and care.

  • Parents’ PTSD after child’s medical trauma

    Nearly half of parents with a child who received an implantable device to correct abnormal heart rhythms met criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Physicians feel more unaccomplished

    In what authors believe to be the largest study of its kind, Stanford Medicine researchers found that imposter syndrome is more prevalent in physicians than in other U.S. workers.

  • Howard Sussman dies at 87

    Howard Sussman played a pivotal role in consolidating and automating Stanford Medicine’s clinical pathology laboratory, implementing an information system used for decades.

  • Deisseroth to receive Horwitz Prize

    The Stanford psychiatrist, neuroscientist and engineer is honored for developing a technology that lets researchers pinpoint the functions — and malfunctions — of specific brain circuits.

  • What to know about monkeypox

    The monkeypox virus is normally endemic to Africa but has recently been found on other continents. It spreads through prolonged, direct contact with infected people or their bedding, clothing and towels.

  • Fish study rebuts anti-evolution argument

    A key developmental gene governs the number and length of spines in the stickleback, Stanford Medicine researchers find. The discovery supports the concept of progressive evolution in nature.

  • Step toward growing organs

    Researchers have shown initial viability of an embryo that contains both chimpanzee and macaque cells in a preliminary study that explores the feasibility of primate organ genesis.

  • Blood sugar control helps teens’ brains

    Diabetes treatment technology improved teenagers’ blood sugar levels and benefited their brain structure and function, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • White coats mark beginning of study

    Stanford Medicine MD and PA students from diverse backgrounds commemorate their past and future at this year’s white coat ceremonies.

  • Expert committee on reproductive health

    A new Stanford Medicine committee is addressing medical, equity, safety, legal and other concerns arising from the Supreme Court ruling on abortion.

  • Viral genome packing key in replication

    Disrupting a virus’s genome packaging can halt replication and jumpstart a natural immune response against subsequent exposures, a Stanford Medicine study finds.

  • Lowering health care billing costs

    Stanford researchers and colleagues find ways to lower health care administration costs within the U.S. multipayer system by analyzing other countries’ approaches.

  • Epilepsy linked to mood symptoms in pregnancy

    Stanford-led study gives new insight into how epilepsy, pregnancy and symptoms of mood disorders interact.

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.

  • Chief diversity and inclusion officer

    Joyce Sackey, advocate and leader of inclusive excellence, will join Stanford Medicine as its inaugural chief diversity and inclusion officer.

  • New pediatric emergency department opens

    The Stanford Medicine Pediatric Emergency Department opened Aug. 10. The child-centered space puts kids at ease while medical professionals deliver advanced care.

  • Reshuffling liver transplant waitlist

    An updated scoring system developed by Stanford Medicine researchers will more accurately prioritize patients on the liver transplant waiting list based on medical urgency.

  • Magazine explores molecules within us

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the molecules that make us who we are and how understanding them can lead to medical discoveries and innovations.

  • Small increase in risk with prostate radiation

    Receiving radiation for prostate cancer increases the risk of other cancers very slightly, Stanford Medicine researchers find, allowing providers to better inform patients weighing treatment options.

  • Stanford Health Care among nation’s top hospitals

    For eighth year running, U.S. News & World Report ranks Stanford Health Care one of the nation’s highest-rated hospitals.

  • Malenka on psychedelic drugs and disorders

    Robert Malenka’s early research on the molecular mechanisms underlying memory and learning has led to an understanding of their role in psychiatric disorders including addiction, depression and autism spectrum disorder.

  • Mark Davis on immunology research

    Vaccinology has taken great leaps forward in the past decade, largely due to advanced analytical methods as well as a shift in researchers’ focus from rodents to humans.

  • Hints into long COVID

    People with lower levels of an antiviral antibody as well as those with lung disease take longer to clear COVID-19 symptoms, say Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • Keto and Mediterranean good for diabetes

    In a trial of the two low-carb diets, both were similarly effective in controlling blood glucose. Keto’s more severe carb restrictions did not provide additional overall health benefits.

  • ‘Digital human’ helps reduce knee stress

    A computer simulation that relates muscle activation patterns to harmful pressure on the knee helps participants adopt knee-protective strategies as they walk.

  • Pediatric emergency department recognized

    Santa Clara County recognized Stanford’s pediatric emergency department for its ability to handle a broad spectrum of medical emergencies in young patients.

  • Targeting enzyme that fuels cancer cells

    Stanford Medicine researchers have created a molecule that blocks an enzyme thought to be instrumental in causing colon cancer relapse or chemotherapy resistance.

  • Joseph Wu to be AHA president

    Beginning July 2023, Wu will lead the nation’s largest nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing cardiovascular health.

  • Leaders pledge to address climate change

    A roundtable at the White House on reducing the health care industry’s climate-warming emissions includes leaders from Stanford Medicine.

  • Awards for COVID-19 project, media work

    A COVID-19 remembrance project, two videos, an article about bad brain cells and Stanford Medicine magazine have been recognized by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

  • Improving clinical trial diversity

    The American Heart Association has provided funding to two Stanford Medicine professors to develop ways to diversify enrollment in heart disease clinical trials.

  • Gummy phlegm and COVID-19

    Levels of a stringy, spongy substance soar in the sputum of COVID-19 patients requiring intubation, accounting for at least some of their breathing trouble. Development of an off-patent drug may prevent it.

  • Stanford Medicine provides monkeypox test

    Stanford Medicine now provides a test for the monkeypox virus. Rapid identification of infected people will help combat the virus’s spread and facilitate patient care.

  • COVID vaccine approved for young kids

    Children as young as 6 months can now receive the Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna mRNA vaccines.

  • Immunosuppression-free kidney transplant

    Using a method they developed for stem cell transplants, a Stanford team has enabled children with immune disorders to receive a new immune system and a matching kidney from a parent.

  • $13 million for cancer research

    The funding, from Cancer Grand Challenges, will help the researchers address difficult problems in cancer prevention, treatment-resistant cancers and therapies for pediatric solid tumors.

  • ‘Anti-hunger’ molecule discovered

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their collaborators have identified a molecule that staves off hunger post-exercise.

  • Jeffrey Glenn receives $69 million grant

    Stanford Medicine’s SyneRx will develop drugs to fight viral pathogens with high pandemic potential, including the one that causes COVID-19.

  • 1,000+genes linked to severe COVID-19

    Using machine learning, researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators found specific genetic signals in people who develop severe coronavirus infection.

  • COVID-19 brain fog similar to chemo brain

    Researchers found that damage to the brain’s white matter after COVID-19 resembles that seen after cancer chemotherapy, raising hope for treatments to help both conditions.

  • Graduates celebrate in person again

    Doctoral, medical and physician assistant students hear messages of hope and compassion as they celebrate graduation.

  • Awards celebrate teaching, patient care

    More than 40 awards were given to faculty, staff, residents and students at Stanford Medicine in recognition of their outstanding contributions during the 2021-2022 academic year.

  • Bacteria that digest breast milk in decline

    Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues found that as nations industrialize, a species of bacteria critical in the early development of infant gut microbiomes fades away.

  • Faculty and staff honored

    Nancy Morioka-Douglas is named physician of the year, the new professionalism award is presented in honor of Kelley Skeff, and Erika Schillinger takes home the quality and safety award.

  • Ketogenic diet helps cells survive stress

    Muscle stem cells enter a deep resting state during fasting or when fed a high-fat ketogenic diet, a Stanford-led study finds. This promotes stem cell resilience but slows injury repair.

  • Addressing AAPI mental health

    A panel of mental health experts discuss culturally specific barriers to seeking care, along with ways to improve outreach.

  • Rare mutation protects against Alzheimer's

    Researchers have discovered that a rare mutation inherited with the APOE4 gene variant protects against Alzheimer's, shedding new light on ways to counteract high-risk genes for the disease.

  • Cancer disparities in Pacific Islanders

    Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders experience poorer breast cancer survival outcomes that are hidden when their data is included in Asian populations, Stanford researcher says.

  • Microbiologist Hugh McDevitt dies at 91

    The Stanford immunologist’s research on how our immune cells recognize pathogens — and what happens when this process goes wrong — paved the way to modern immunology.

  • Awards for promoting diversity

    An event at Stanford Hospital honors a school of medicine faculty member, a fellow and a student for their efforts to diversify the medical field and promote health equity.

  • Refining law on the definition of death

    Experts propose revising the legal and medical standard on declaring someone dead based on respiratory function and likelihood of consciousness rather than cessation of brain function.

  • ‘Remote-controlled’ CAR-T cell therapy safer

    Stanford researchers modified anti-cancer CAR-T cells so they can be controlled with an oral drug. The modified cells are safer, more potent and more active against solid tumors in mice.

  • Garry Gold appointed chair of radiology

    Garry Gold, who specializes in understanding osteoarthritis via MRI, has been appointed chair of the Department of Radiology, embracing a vision of early disease detection.

  • How Stanford Medicine tackles opioid crisis

    At Stanford Medicine, programs to help patients struggling with substance-abuse disorders, research into addiction, and educational programs to increase awareness about addiction and treatment are aimed at reducing dependence on opioids.

  • Lisa Wise-Faberowski dies at 57

    Lisa Wise-Faberowski, who studied a rare congenital heart condition as well as the effects of anesthesia on children’s developing brains, died at 57.

  • Brain plasticity leads to worse seizures

    A brain mechanism needed for learning explains why epileptic seizures become more frequent, but a finding in rodents offers hope for treatment, according to a new study.

  • Marijuana can damage heart

    Marijuana use and heart-attack risk were correlated in a large human study, Stanford scientists and their collaborators found. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects.

  • New members of arts, sciences academy

    Stanford Medicine professors David Relman and Abraham Verghese were among the nine Stanford faculty members elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Teens’ brains tuned to unfamiliar voices

    Around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices, part of the biological signal driving teens to separate from their parents, a Stanford Medicine study has found.

  • Fiber supplements’ effects differ

    Researchers found that one fiber supplement seemed helpful while another appeared harmful — but study participants’ reactions varied.

  • Program helps diverse postdocs

    Stanford’s Propel program helps postdoctoral scholars from groups underrepresented in the biomedical sciences prepare for academic careers. The goal is to diversify the profession.

  • Monack named Microbiology and Immunology chair

    Monack, whose research focuses on interactions between microbial pathogens and the immune system during infections, succeeds David Schneider.

  • Laurene Powell Jobs to give keynote address

    The 2022 ceremony, the first in-person diploma-awarding event in three years, will honor students earning PhDs, MDs and master’s degrees.

  • Medical students named Soros fellows

    The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans has announced 30 new members for 2022, three of whom are Stanford medical students.

  • Anne Brunet wins Lurie Prize

    Anne Brunet was awarded the 2022 Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences for her efforts to understand the mechanism of aging.

  • Neurobiologist Denis Baylor dies at 82

    Baylor, former chair of the Department of Neurobiology, gained international recognition for discovering the electrical language used by the retina to translate light from the outside world into signals that the brain reads.

  • Electric current aids stroke recovery

    Stanford scientists have developed a device that delivers and electrically stimulates stem cells to promote stroke healing.

  • Teaching about addiction treatment

    An addiction medicine curriculum at Stanford School of Medicine trains students to better understand causes of and treatments for substance use disorders.

  • Communications office wins national awards

    The Office of Communications received seven awards from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  • COVID RNA lingers in feces

    People with mild to moderate COVID-19 can shed viral RNA in their feces months after initial infection, Stanford researchers find. Those who do often have nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

  • Students create low-tech antiviral method

    Using household items, Stanford students have developed a way to make affordable nasal drops with the potential to slow the spread of viruses like COVID-19.

  • Moms of sick kids seek more health care

    Mothers facing the daily challenges of caring for children with congenital anomalies seek more health care and mental health services than other mothers, a Stanford-led study finds.

  • Living with handgun owner raises homicide risk

    Residents who don’t own a handgun but live with someone who does are significantly more likely to die by homicide compared with those in gun-free homes, research shows.

  • Vaccines bolster immunity from prior infection

    Two-dose COVID-19 vaccines significantly increase protection against hospitalization and death in people who had the illness before they were immunized.

  • Immunologist Samuel Strober dies at 81

    Strober, a professor and former chief of immunology and rheumatology, found a way for transplant recipients to reduce or abandon immunosuppressive drugs yet avoid organ rejection.

  • Test can predict severe dengue

    Researchers have created a test that can predict which dengue patients will likely have mild symptoms and which should be clinically monitored for a high risk of severe illness.

  • Pediatric bowel disease center launches

    A $70 million donation will enable researchers to offer more treatments to Stanford Children's Health patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease or celiac disease.

  • Diabetes drug linked to birth defects

    In men, the use of metformin may affect sperm development in a way that increases birth defects in their sons, a study found.

  • Gene-therapy gel shows promise for skin disease

    Stanford researchers have been working on gene therapies for epidermolysis bullosa, or “butterfly disease,” for over a decade. A new gel helped wounds heal and stay healed in a clinical trial.

  • Top scores from LGBTQ group

    An advocacy group for gender and sexual minorities has awarded scores of 100 to Stanford Medicine health care organizations.

  • Two-mom families face more pregnancy risks

    In the first U.S. population-based study of obstetric health among sexual- and gender-minority parents, Stanford researchers find higher rates of some birth complications.

  • New therapies for rare blood cancer

    Hematologist Jason Gotlib wanted more effective treatments for patients with systemic mastocytosis. His research has led to the approval of two new treatments by the Food and Drug Administration.

  • Hyperexcitable neurons drive sleep instability

    Researchers have identified a mechanism underlying fragmented sleep with older age, paving the way for potential drug therapies.

  • Possible treatment for mucus-induced lung diseases

    Stanford Medicine investigators and their collaborators have designed a compound that’s uniquely capable of blocking excessive mucus secretion — a hallmark of several serious respiratory disorders.

  • On Match Day, residency placements revealed

    For the first time in three years, medical students could gather on campus to mark the moment they would discover where they had matched for internships and residencies.

  • The pandemic turns 2

    Stanford Medicine scientists explain what we know, and what we don’t know, about living with COVID-19 two years after the World Health Organization declared a pandemic.

  • Key molecule’s structure found at last

    The structure of a critical cellular-signaling molecule has finally been discovered by Stanford researchers. The finding may lead to new therapies.

  • Cancer drugs might be used to treat TB

    Tuberculosis lesions in the lungs have high levels of proteins that suppress the immune system. Cancer drugs that target these proteins could be used to fight the bacterial infection.

  • ‘Military police’ cells stem autoimmunity

    A new study has identified a way that the immune system shoots down its own cells when their anti-viral activity threatens to become friendly fire. The finding could pave the way to new treatments for autoimmune diseases.

  • Inaugural chief data scientist

    As the inaugural chief data scientist for Stanford Health Care, Nigam Shah will lead an effort to advance the use of artificial intelligence in patient care and hospital administration.

  • What it means to be a Black doctor

    Black physicians and alumni of Stanford Medicine discussed their experiences in the medical profession, from serving as role models to feeling isolated.

  • Ami Bhatt on gut microbiomes

    The Stanford Medicine professor on why it’s important to better understand the microbiome of people transitioning from traditional to Westernized lifestyles.

  • Leaders discuss plans for Stanford Medicine

    In remarks at the State of Stanford Medicine address, the medical school dean and the CEOs of Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children’s Health praised their organizations’ response to the pandemic and outlined plans for the upcoming year.

  • Gene behind ALS hallmark discovered

    Stanford Medicine researchers have linked a specific gene known to be associated with ALS with a characteristic of the disease, opening avenues for a targeted therapy.

  • Emergency outcomes for veterans

    Veterans taken by ambulance to VA hospitals have significantly higher survival rates than veterans transported to non-VA hospitals, researchers find.

  • Autism is different in girls’ brains

    Girls with autism differ in several brain centers compared with boys with the disorder, suggesting gender-specific diagnostics are needed, a Stanford study using artificial intelligence found.

  • Lab processes 1 millionth COVID-19 test

    Stanford Medicine’s clinical virology laboratory has processed its 1 millionth COVID-19 test nearly two years after becoming one of the first academic center testing sites in the country.

  • William Northway dies at 89

    The Stanford pediatric radiologist, after noticing a new and disturbing pattern among lung X-rays of premature infants, forever altered treatment for the smallest babies.

  • Emotional-wellness tool for health care workers

    Stanford Medicine psychologists have created a free mental health resource that health care workers, and anyone, can access online for emotional support.

  • Vaccination protects better than infection

    COVID-19 vaccines are better than infection at making antibodies to recognize new viral variants, according to a Stanford study.

  • 50 years of physician assistant education

    A physician assistant training program that began in 1971 to certify battlefield medics returning from Vietnam has evolved into a sought-after master’s degree.

  • Implants, natural eyesight coordinate

    A Stanford scientist and his colleagues show that patients fitted with a chip in their eye are able to integrate what the chip “sees” with objects their natural peripheral vision detects.

  • Report on opioid crisis calls for action

    The opioid epidemic is projected to claim 1.22 million U.S. lives this decade without new efforts to stem the crisis, according to a report that traces the roots of the problem and offers in-depth solutions.

  • Cancer drug renders COVID vaccine ineffective

    Rituximab, a drug widely used in patients with lymphoma, blunts or eliminates the antibody response to COVID-19 vaccines if it is administered before them, Stanford researchers say.

  • How Epstein-Barr virus triggers multiple sclerosis

    A new study found that part of the Epstein-Barr virus mimics a protein made in the brain and spinal cord, leading the immune system to mistakenly attack the body’s nerve cells.

  • Sex differences in genes of mice brains

    Stanford scientists found more than 1,000 gene-activation differences between female and male mice’s brains, plus more than 600 between females in different stages of their reproductive cycle.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Antibodies may predict COVID-19 severity

    A look at antibodies in patients soon after they were infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 showed key differences between those whose cases remained mild and those who later developed severe symptoms.

  • Therapeutics accelerator launched

    Deerfield Management, a health care investment firm, has committed up to $130 million to support innovative translational research at Stanford.

  • Antibody synergy targets tough cancers

    Two anti-cancer antibodies have a much stronger effect against pediatric nerve-cell and bone cancers in mice than either one alone, researchers have discovered.

  • Fastest genome sequencing

    A research effort led by Stanford scientists set the first Guinness World Record for the fastest DNA sequencing technique, which was used to sequence a human genome in just 5 hours and 2 minutes.

  • Hormone treatment for transgender teens

    Transgender adults who started gender-affirming hormone therapy as teens had better mental health than those who waited until adulthood or wanted the treatment but never received it, a Stanford-led study found.

  • New Stanford Health Care board chair

    Silicon Valley entrepreneur Marc E. Jones has been a board member since 2020. He succeeds John Levin as chair.

  • Stanford ranks high for complex heart procedures

    For patients like Nathan Foss, Stanford’s expertise in rare and complicated heart surgeries provides better options.

  • Major grant renewal for Stanford Cancer Institute

    The Stanford Cancer Institute is one of 51 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers, which must meet rigorous standards for improving the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  • Team-care model helps clinicians, patients

    A team-based approach to primary care reduces clinician burnout, but those gains quickly fade if staffing isn’t maintained, researchers say.

  • Hematologist Steven Coutre dies

    Steven Coutre was known for his research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his humility and his love of traveling and family.

  • Deadly disease races among crowded inmates

    Stanford infectious disease expert Jason Andrews has spent years studying the spread of tuberculosis in crowded Brazilian prisons and surrounding communities — an overlooked global health crisis.

  • 500th heart transplant at Stanford

    Mackenzie Collins was the 500th pediatric patient to undergo a heart transplant at Stanford Medicine.

  • Grant for faculty family care

    The Doris Duke foundation has awarded the Stanford School of Medicine $550,000 to aid physician-scientists with family caregiving responsibilities heightened by COVID-19.

  • Transfusion boosts brain function

    In a Stanford study, sedentary mice appear to benefit from another same-aged mouse’s exercise — if they receive injections of its blood.

  • Surgery rates rebounded quickly in pandemic

    After a dramatic drop in nonessential surgery rates early in the pandemic, U.S. hospitals quickly adapted to new safety protocols, and rates returned to normal, Stanford Medicine research shows.

  • Diversity key to cholesterol risk prediction

    A Stanford study shows that using genomes from a diverse pool of people improves the ability to predict an individual’s risk of having high cholesterol.

  • Stanford Health Care named top hospital

    Leapfrog Group, a national leader in rating the quality of U.S. hospitals, has named Stanford Health Care a top academic medical center.

  • Healthy-aging proponent James Fries dies at 83

    The professor of rheumatology and immunology created an early computer database to follow rheumatology patients. The knowledge he gained from it precipitated his “compression of morbidity” hypothesis.

  • Study: COVID-19 vaccine effective in cancer patients

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines prevented COVID-19 infection in cancer patients, particularly in those whose treatment concluded more than six months before vaccination, say researchers at Stanford, Harvard and the VA.

  • Piecemeal e-cigarette policies bad for youth

    Flavored disposable e-cigarettes attractive to young users proliferated after the most recent round of FDA policy announcements, negating the policies’ intended effects, a Stanford study found.

  • Smartwatch stress alerts

    Stanford Medicine researchers created an algorithm to notify smartwatch wearers of stress, capturing events such as air travel, extended exercise and illness.

  • Experts: Pandemic sparked key innovations

    In the final installment of The Pandemic Puzzle: Lessons from COVID-19, leaders in government, academia, health care and business said biomedical and digital health advances of the last few years will help combat future health crises.

  • Researchers to study long COVID

    Data suggest that between 10% and 30% of those who have had an acute SARS-CoV-2 infection will experience the persistent pattern of symptoms known as long COVID.

  • Pathology faculty net four NIH grants

    Efforts to design a hepatitis C vaccine, understand the genetic causes of rare diseases, map genetic regulatory elements in organ systems and understand coronavirus immune responses garner over $40 million.

  • Grants for genome research

    Five Stanford researchers will participate in a $180 million nationwide campaign by the National Institutes of Health to understand the effect of human-genome variations on health and disease.

  • Common genetic profile linked to drug reaction

    New medications help many people with inflammatory conditions and may ease severe COVID-19, but they carry risks.

  • Climate change and health

    The director of the Center for Innovation in Global Health explains how the medical community is at the center of the climate change debate.

  • New immunotherapy targets tumors

    Stanford researchers have developed a synthetic, tumor-targeting molecule that promotes immune activation and tumor regression in laboratory mice after it’s injected into their bloodstreams.

  • COVID-19 nasal spray vaccine

    A potential COVID-19 vaccine, delivered via a squirt up the nose, shows promise in mice.