Infectious Disease & Global Health

Infectious Disease & Global Health

The Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine Division at Stanford is noted for pioneering research, innovation, and outstanding clinical care and subspecialty training. Many of our faculty sit within and conduct research with the Center for Innovation in Global Health and the Woods Institute for the Environment.


Infectious Disease & Global Health News

  • Reducing tapeworm infection in kids

    Tapeworm infection from eating contaminated pork can damage the brain, causing learning impairments and possibly enforcing cycles of poverty. A Stanford study is the first to look at infection rates within schools and propose solutions targeting children.


  • Improving cancer care in Nigeria

    Stanford physicians are engaged in an ongoing and wide-ranging collaboration with the country’s ministry of health and doctors at major university-affiliated hospitals to improve several areas of cancer care.


  • Conference on human immune monitoring

    The two-day event will highlight the latest research by top scientists on technologies and analytic methods geared toward studying human immunology.


  • Seed grants go to nine global health projects

    The Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health has awarded seed grants to investigators who are applying innovative approaches to address health challenges in resource-poor settings.


  • Better sanitation improves health

    A Stanford-led study found that improving water, sanitation and hygiene in poor regions of Bangladesh helped overall health but, contrary to expectations, did not improve children’s growth.


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