Identifying Early Signs of Psychosis in Adolescents and Young Adults

ONLINE CME COURSE

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored by the Stanford University School of Medicine. Presented by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Description

This CME activity provides a practical approach to the identification and screening of suspected psychosis. Narrative storytelling and didactic pieces provide a unique insight into the mind of a patient experiencing the early signs and symptoms of psychosis. Case scenarios will be used to demonstrate skills in talking to young people, and their families, about psychosis. Early warning signs will be reviewed along with high-yield screening questions to support understanding, identifying and treating psychosis in adolescents and young adults.

Intended Audience

This course is designed for family practice, primary care, pediatrics and psychiatry physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and school social workers.

 

Dates, Duration and Fee

  • Release Date: November 16, 2018
  • Expiration Date: November 16, 2021
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2 Hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

To Obtain CME Credits

  • Review the information below and complete the entire activity.
  • Complete the CME Post-test, CME Assessment Survey, and CME Activity Completion Statement at the end of the activity.
  • You must receive a score of 75% or higher on the post-test in order to receive a certificate. You will have two attempts to answer each multiple-choice question (or one attempt for questions with only two options) to pass the post-test.
  • Once you attest to completing the entire online activity and have scored 75% or higher on the post-test, your certificate will be generated automatically and will be available on your Dashboard page.
  • Physicians will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. All other participants will receive a Certificate of Participation.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

·       Recognize the identifying signs of psychosis and the range of patient presentations in psychosis

·       Describe the signs of psychosis and impact of misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis

·       Apply appropriate screening questions to aid the identification of a possible ​psychotic disorder

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Introduction
  2. Module 1. Basics of Psychosis
  3. Module 2. A Psychosis Diagnosis
  4. Module 3. Treating Psychosis
  5. Course Wrap-Up
  6. Resources and References
  7. Help!

Disclosures

The following planners and authors have indicated that that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

Douglas Louis Noordsy, MD
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 
Stanford University School of Medicine
Course Director, Author

Kate Hardy, Psych.D 
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
Stanford University School of Medicine
Co-Course Director, Author

Steven Adelsheim, MD 
Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University School of Medicine 
Planner

 

Technical Design and Development

Hardware/Software Requirements

  • Computer with Internet connection
  • Current version of Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser. You must have javascript enabled.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credit TM from organizations accredited by the ACCME. Please check with your state’s credentialing board for their requirements.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

Stanford University School of Medicine has received and has used undesignated program funding from Pfizer, Inc. to facilitate the development of innovative CME activities designed to enhance physician competence and performance and to implement advanced technology. A portion of this funding supports this activity.

 

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws.

CME Privacy Policy

CONTACT INFORMATION

If you are having problems, contact the CME Online support team at CMEonline@stanford.edu and we will follow-up with you to resolve your issue.

Bibliography

Hardy KV, Ballon JS, Adelsheim S, Noordsy DL, editors. Intervening Early in Psychosis: A Team Approach. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, in press

Hardy KV, Ballon JS. Intervening early in first episode psychosis in a college setting. In: Student Mental Health: A Guide for Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Leaders Serving in Higher Education, edited by L.W. Roberts. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Press, 2018

Pesko M, Poon AW, Noordsy DL. The psychiatric evaluation of the young adult university student. In: Student Mental Health: A Guide for Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Leaders Serving in Higher Education, edited by L.W. Roberts. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Press, 2018

Sale T, Fetzer P, Humensky J, Baker M, Hardy K, Noordsy D, Adelsheim S. The integration of early psychosis services in a system of care framework: Opportunities, issues and recommendations. Monograph for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, April, 2018

Hardy KV, Noordsy DLBallon JS, McGovern MP, Solomon C, Wiltsey-Stirman S. Impact of age of onset of psychosis and engagement in higher education on duration of untreated psychosis. Journal of Mental Health, ePub ahead of print, 28 April, 2018, doi: 10.1080/09638237.2018.1466047 

Noordsy DLBurgess J, Hardy KV, Yudofsky LM, Ballon JS. Therapeutic potential of physical exercise in early psychosis. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 175(3):209-214, 2018

Noordsy DL, Rush WK. Initial presentation with schizophrenia: Assessment, management and long-term outcomes. Journal of Clinical Outcomes Medicine, 9:208-215, 2002

More bibliographic information can be found in the Resources and References section.

©2018 Stanford University School of Medicine

Course Details

  • Ongoing registration for this self-paced course is available until November 16, 2021
  • Estimated Time to Complete: 2.0 hours
  • CME Credits Offered: 2.00
  • Registration Fee: FREE

Contact Information

If you are having problems, contact the CME Online support team at CMEonline@stanford.edu and we will follow-up with you to resolve your issue.

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