TIA Triage Trial and Evaluation of Vascular-Specific Inflammatory BiomarkerLp-PLA2 as a Stratification Tool for TIA Triage and Stroke Risk

Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient neurological deficit (speech disturbance, weakness?), caused by temporary occlusion of a brain vessel by a blood clot that leaves no lasting effect. TIA diagnosis can be challenging and an expert stroke evaluation combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve the diagnosis accuracy. The risk of a debilitating stroke can be as high as 5% during the first 72 hrs after TIA. TIA characteristics (duration, type of symptoms, age of the patient), the presence of a significant narrowing of the neck vessels responsible for the patient's symptoms (symptomatic stenosis), and an abnormal MRI are associated with an increased risk of stroke. An emergent evaluation and treatment of TIA patients by a stroke specialist could reduce the risk of stroke to 2%. Stanford has implemented an expedited triage pathway for TIA patients combining a clinical evaluation by a stroke neurologist, an acute MRI of the brain and the vessels and a sampling of biomarkers (Lp-PLA2). The investigators are investigating the yield of this unique approach to improve TIA diagnosis, prognosis and secondary stroke prevention. The objective of this prospective cohort study is to determine which factors will help the physician to confirm the diagnosis of TIA and to define the risk of stroke after a TIA.

Stanford is now accepting new patients for this trial. Please contact Stephanie Kemp, BS at 650-723-4481 for more information.

Investigator(s):

Phase: N/A

Eligibility

Ages Eligible For Study:

N/A - N/A

Inclusion Criteria

- Men and Women age greater than 18 year old - Symptoms suggestive of an acute TIA

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Contact information

Primary Contact:

Stephanie Kemp, BS 650-723-4481

Stanford University School of Medicine 300 Pasteur Drive Stanford, CA 94305

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