Background

The overall incidence of gastric cancer in the United States is low at 7.4 new cases per 100,000 men and women per year; however, the overall incidence worldwide is much higher with gastric cancer being the 2nd leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in 2018. Within the US population, several ethnic groups are at high-risk for developing gastric cancer including Asians, African Americans, Native Americans/Alaksa Natives, Hispanics, and immigrants from high incidence regions. Gastric Cancer is one of the largest health care disparities for minority populations that currently exists in the US. The incidence of gastric cancer in cetain regions of the world are greater than the incidence of colon cancer in the US. Outcomes for those who develop gastric cancer in the US are drastically inferior to outcomes in Japan and Korea, where national gastric cancer screening programs exist.

General Meeting Objectives

To open a dialogue between clinicians and researchers specializing in gastric cancer and health policy experts to address the current health disparity that exists affecting several minority groups including Asians, African Americans, Native Americans/Alaska Natives, Hispanics and immigrants from high incidence regions.

Long-term goal

To establish screening and surveillance guidelines for those who are at high-risk for gastric cancer. (For example: Patients at high-risk for gastric cancer should have upper endoscopy along with colonoscopy for colon cancer screening at the age of 50.)