Affiliates

Fiona Baumer
Assistant Professor of Neurology (Pediatric Neurology) and of Pediatrics

Bio

Dr. Fiona Baumer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Child Neurology. She is a graduate of the Stanford Human Biology program and pursued medical training at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital. She returned to Stanford for epilepsy fellowship and now serves as an attending in child neurology. Her clinical efforts focus on caring for children with epilepsy and running the TMS Presurgical Mapping Program. She has completed post-doctoral work in the labs of Dr. Robert Fisher and Dr. Amit Etkin, focusing on using transcranial magnetic stimulation paired with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) to study brain dynamics in children with epilepsy. As a result of this work, she was awarded the K23 Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award from the National Institute of Health. She is also a co-PI for a National Consortium of Pediatric TMS Centers funded by the Pediatric Epilepsy Research Foundation. Dr. Baumer's research focuses on understanding the impact of abnormal brain activity (called spike waves) on brain network connectivity to determine if spike waves contribute to cognitive comorbidities in children with epilepsy. Her research uses high-density EEG and TMS-EEG to study how children with epilepsy process language and to determine the impact of spike waves on this processing. The goal of her research is to determine if non-invasive stimulation techniques like TMS may be a feasible therapy to improve language, learning and cognition in this population.
Charles DeBattista
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult)
Lawrence Fung MD PhD
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

Bio

Dr. Lawrence Fung is an associate professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He is the director of the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, director of the Neurodiversity Clinic, and principal investigator at the Fung Lab. His work, which focuses on autism and neurodiversity, traverses from multi-modal neuroimaging studies to a new conceptualization of neurodiversity and its application to clinical, educational, and employment settings. His lab advances the understanding of neural bases of human socio-communicative and cognitive functions by using novel neuroimaging and bioanalytical technologies. Using a community-based participatory research approach, his team devises and implements novel interventions to improve the lives of neurodiverse individuals by maximizing their potential and productivity. His work has been supported by various agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, Autism Speaks, California Department of Developmental Services, California Department of Rehabilitation, and philanthropy. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Cornell University and his M.D. from George Washington University. He completed his general psychiatry residency, child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship, and postdoctoral research fellowship at Stanford.
Gary Glover
Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

Bio

My research interests encompass the physics and mathematics of imaging with Magnetic Resonance (MR). My research is directed in part towards exploration of rapid MRI scanning methods using spiral and other non-Cartesian k-space trajectories for dynamic imaging of function. Using spiral techniques, we have developed MRI pulse sequences and processing methods for mapping cortical brain function by imaging the metabolic response to various stimuli, with applications in the basic neurosciences as well as for clinical applications. These methods develop differential image contrast from hemodynamically driven increases in oxygen content in the vascular bed of activated cortex (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent, or BOLD contrast), using pulse sequences sensitive to the paramagnetic behavior of deoxyhemoglobin or to the blood flow changes. Other interests include multimodal imaging using fMRI in conjunction with EEG, fPET, fNIRS, and neuromodulation with tDCS, tACS, TMS and HiFU. Investigating viscoelasticity of human brain using MR Elastography is of interest as an alternative to BOLD contrast for depicting brain activation.
Michael Greicius, MD, MPH
Iqbal Farrukh and Asad Jamal Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Administrative and Academic Special Programs)
Michael Greicius, MD, MPH
Iqbal Farrukh and Asad Jamal Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Administrative and Academic Special Programs)
Jennifer Keller
Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Bio

Dr. Jennifer Keller is a clinical psychologist who specializes in the assessment of psychiatric conditions. She conducts evaluations for adults on a wide-variety of conditions, including attention deficits (ADHD), cognitive and memory changes or impairments, mood and anxiety disorders, thought disorders, and effects of trauma. She has practiced as a psychologist for more than 15 years. Dr. Keller has a special interest in working with women with interpersonal trauma.
Carolyn Rodriguez
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

Bio

Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Stanford University School of Medicine and a Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs. As the Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dr. Rodriguez leads studies investigating the brain basis of severe mental disorders. Her landmark clinical trials pioneer rapid-acting treatments for illnesses including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and related disorders. Her NIH-, foundation-, and donor-funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies span targeted glutamatergic and opioid pathway pharmacotherapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, psychotherapy and suicide prevention. She is co-author of “Hoarding Disorder: A Comprehensive Clinical Guide,” published August 2022 by APA Publishing. Dr. Rodriguez also serves as Deputy Editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry, member of the Research Council of the American Psychiatric Association, member of Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Scientific Council, member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Advisory Group, and Scientific and Clinical Advisory Board member of the International OCD Foundation. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research. Carolyn presented her research at the World Economic Forum in Davos and Fortune Brainstorm Health 2022 and her work has been highlighted by organizations including NPR, PBS, New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, Newsweek, Fortune, and Time.com. She contributes articles to Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post to share scientific findings with the public. Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University, followed by an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and three children in Palo Alto.
Manish Saggar
Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

Bio

Dr. Manish Saggar is an Assistant Professor in Computational Neuropsychiatry at Stanford University and currently directs the Brain Dynamics Lab. The overarching goal of his lab is to develop computational methods that could allow for anchoring psychiatric diagnosis into biological features (e.g., neural circuits, spatiotemporal neurodynamics). His lab is funded through an NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (DP2), an NIMH R01, and a faculty scholar award from Stanford’s Maternal and Child Health Research Institute. He has previously received a career development award (K99/R00) from the NIMH and BBRF’s NARSAD Young Investigator Award. His work has been recognized by several local and national and international awards. His lab excels in developing data-driven computational methods to generate clinically and behaviorally relevant insights from high-dimensional biological data (e.g., neuroimaging) without necessarily averaging the data at the outset. The lab also actively pursue developing novel technologies for experimental design and data collection for enhancing human cognition (e.g., creativity and collaboration). Dr. Saggar received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin and later received postdoctoral training in Psychiatry from Stanford University School of Medicine.
Manish Saggar
Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

Bio

Dr. Manish Saggar is an Assistant Professor in Computational Neuropsychiatry at Stanford University and currently directs the Brain Dynamics Lab. The overarching goal of his lab is to develop computational methods that could allow for anchoring psychiatric diagnosis into biological features (e.g., neural circuits, spatiotemporal neurodynamics). His lab is funded through an NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (DP2), an NIMH R01, and a faculty scholar award from Stanford’s Maternal and Child Health Research Institute. He has previously received a career development award (K99/R00) from the NIMH and BBRF’s NARSAD Young Investigator Award. His work has been recognized by several local and national and international awards. His lab excels in developing data-driven computational methods to generate clinically and behaviorally relevant insights from high-dimensional biological data (e.g., neuroimaging) without necessarily averaging the data at the outset. The lab also actively pursue developing novel technologies for experimental design and data collection for enhancing human cognition (e.g., creativity and collaboration). Dr. Saggar received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin and later received postdoctoral training in Psychiatry from Stanford University School of Medicine.
Manish Saggar
Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

Bio

Dr. Manish Saggar is an Assistant Professor in Computational Neuropsychiatry at Stanford University and currently directs the Brain Dynamics Lab. The overarching goal of his lab is to develop computational methods that could allow for anchoring psychiatric diagnosis into biological features (e.g., neural circuits, spatiotemporal neurodynamics). His lab is funded through an NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (DP2), an NIMH R01, and a faculty scholar award from Stanford’s Maternal and Child Health Research Institute. He has previously received a career development award (K99/R00) from the NIMH and BBRF’s NARSAD Young Investigator Award. His work has been recognized by several local and national and international awards. His lab excels in developing data-driven computational methods to generate clinically and behaviorally relevant insights from high-dimensional biological data (e.g., neuroimaging) without necessarily averaging the data at the outset. The lab also actively pursue developing novel technologies for experimental design and data collection for enhancing human cognition (e.g., creativity and collaboration). Dr. Saggar received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin and later received postdoctoral training in Psychiatry from Stanford University School of Medicine.
Hugh Brent Solvason PhD MD
Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Trisha Suppes, MD, PhD
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)
Leanne Williams
Vincent V.C. Woo Professor, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Psychology

Bio

Leanne Williams, PhD, is the inaugural Vincent V.C. Woo Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Within the Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness she directs the PanLab for Personalized And translational Neuroscience Lab. She holds the position of Associate Chair of Translational Neuroscience within the leadership team of the Stanford Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She holds a joint appointment as Director of the Precision Medicine Core at the Palo Alto VA Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center. Prior to joining the Stanford community, Dr. Williams was the Professor of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry and Director of the Brain Dynamics Center at Sydney Medical School. Her PhD was completed with a British Council Scholarship for study at Oxford University. She has developed a precision neuroscience approach for application in psychiatry. This approach is grounded in a taxonomy of biotypes for depression and anxiety and a new image processing system to quantify these biotypes. Her research uses biotypes for more individualized diagnosis and for personalizing and tailoring the treatment. She evaluates pharmacotherapies, behavioral interventions, novel selective medicines, neuromodulation, and exploratory therapeutics. To tie together findings across studies, she integrates common neuroimaging, behavioral, and clinical measures. Computational approaches are used to further refine and expand her approach to precision mental health. Dr. Williams' research programs are supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health. She has published the first book on Precision Psychiatry and contributed over 388 scientific papers to the field.
David C. Yeomans
Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Timothy Durazzo
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)
Booil Jo
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)
Kristin Raj
Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Bio

Dr. Raj specializes in the treatment of mood disorders with an expertise in neuromodulation and in the psychopharmacological management of bipolar disorder. She is chief of interventional psychiatry, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroconvulsive therapy, co-chief of mood disorders and chief of the bipolar clinic. She is the director of education for interventional psychiatry where she manages resident education in ECT and TMS and development of didactics. She is also co-director of the neuroscience curriculum for the psychiatry residency where she has worked to assess and create a new series of interactive lectures. She currently serves on the Board of Directors and the Education Committee of the Clinical TMS society. She is on the Board of Directors for the Foundation for the Advancement of Clinical TMS.
Kristin Raj
Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Bio

Dr. Raj specializes in the treatment of mood disorders with an expertise in neuromodulation and in the psychopharmacological management of bipolar disorder. She is chief of interventional psychiatry, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroconvulsive therapy, co-chief of mood disorders and chief of the bipolar clinic. She is the director of education for interventional psychiatry where she manages resident education in ECT and TMS and development of didactics. She is also co-director of the neuroscience curriculum for the psychiatry residency where she has worked to assess and create a new series of interactive lectures. She currently serves on the Board of Directors and the Education Committee of the Clinical TMS society. She is on the Board of Directors for the Foundation for the Advancement of Clinical TMS.
This profile is not available
This profile is not available