April 20 Apr 20
2015
03:15 PM - 4:15 PM
Monday Mon

Ethical and Legal Issues in Biosecurity

Ethical and legal issues abound in the field of BioSecurity and Disaster Medicine. Professory Greely will discuss such issues as: Who can call quarantine in an infectious disease disaster? Is it ethical to enforce quarantine, even if it means separating families and taking people away from their plans and regular activities? How do recent Ebola-related quarantine decisions illustrate the above points? When dealing with an aftermath of an infectious disease disaster or a bioterrorism event, how should the scarce resources (both medical and not) be allocated? In a disaster situation, should the goal be to provide medical treatment for the greatest good/maximize the number of lives saved, or should we attempt to save every person even if it means saving fewer total lives? 

Location

Li Ka Shing Learning & Knowledge Center (LKSC)
291 Campus Dr.
Palo Alto, CA 94305
USA

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Li Ka Shing Learning & Knowledge Center (LKSC)

291 Campus Dr.
Palo Alto CA, 94305
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Speaker

Hank Greely, JD. Chair, Steering Committee of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at Stanford; Director, Center for Law and the Biosciences at the Stanford Law School; Professor (by courtesy) of Genetics, Stanford School of Medicine

Hank Greely, JD: Director, Center for Law and the Biosciences at the Stanford Law School; Professor (by courtesy) of Genetics, Stanford School of Medicine; Chair, Steering Committee of the Center for Biomedical Ethics.

Hank Greely specializes in the ethical, legal, and social implications of new biomedical technologies, particularly those related to neuroscience, genetics, or stem cell research. He frequently serves as an advisor on California, national, and international policy issues. He is chair of California’s Human Stem Cell Research Advisory Committee, a member of the Advisory Council of the NIH's National Institute for General Medical Sciences. Professor Greely chairs the steering committee for the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and directs both the law school’s Center for Law and the Biosciences and the Stanford Interdisciplinary Group on Neuroscience and Society. In 2007 Professor Greely was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 1985, Greely was a partner at Tuttle & Taylor, served as a staff assistant to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy, and as special assistant to the general counsel of the U.S. Department of Defense. He served as a law clerk to Justice Potter Stewart of the U.S. Supreme Court and to Judge John Minor Wisdom of the Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Greely is also a professor (by courtesy) of genetics at Stanford School of Medicine.