SCBE in the News 2018

December

Nature, 12/19/18

--Data mining for health: staking out the ethical territory of digital phenotyping

Digital phenotyping uses smartphone and wearable signals to measure cognition, mood, and behavior. This promising new approach has been developed as an objective, passive assessment tool for the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness.This paper addresses four major areas where guidelines and best practices will be helpful: transparency, informed consent, privacy, and accountability. Nicole Martinez-Martin, a postdoctoral scholar, and Mildred Cho, a professor of pediatrics, are both contributors.

Scope, 12/19/18

--Cholera and starvation in Yemen are preventable, Stanford pediatrician says

Paul Wise, the Richard E. Behrman Professor in Child Health and a professor of pediatrics, was the co-author of a recent report on the cholera epidemic in Yemen. Here he discusses the epidemic and the widespread starvation that accompanies it. 

Shots (NPR), 12/13/18

--Scientists say gene-edited babies claim is 'wake-up call' for world

Presidents of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Sciences wrote an editorial this week calling for an international effort to prevent the creation of gene-edited babies without approval. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, is quoted here. 

Scope, 12/12/18

--Can artificial intelligence help doctors with the human side of medicine?

Abraham Verghese and Sonoo Thadaney Israni explore how AI could help doctors remain caring and generous in a recent essay and podcast. Verghese is the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor; Israni is the executive director of Presence and of the Program in Bedside Medicine/Stanford 25. 

Popular Science, 12/06/18

--The gene-edited Chinese twins represent a multi-generational ethical quandary

This piece explores whether the parents of the twins reportedly created using CRISPR were appropriately advised of the risks of the undertaking. Kelly Ormond, professor of genetics, is included here. 

November

Associated Press, 11/27/18
--Q&A on scientist’s bombshell claim of gene-edited babies
A scientist in China announced that he had created the world’s first genetically edited babies, twin girls who were born this month. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, provides comment in this Q&A. 

Los Angeles Times, 11/26/18

--Why geneticists say it’s wrong to edit the DNA of embryos to protect them against HIV
This Q&A with Michael Snyder, the Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor and chair of genetics, explores the science and ethics of editing DNA in human embryos following reports of the first genetically modified humans in China. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, also provides comment on the subject in a CNBC piece

Reuters, 11/20/18

--BioMarin sets stage early for hemophilia cure off-Broadway
BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. is turning to the theater to establish its name with hemophilia patients, long before its experimental cure for the bleeding disorder could reach the market. Alyssa Burgart, pediatric anesthesiologist and bioethicist, is quoted here. 

Scope, 11/20/18

--Proposal to include the price of drugs in television ads is flawed, Stanford scholar writes
A proposed federal rule to require direct-to-consumer television ads for prescription drugs to include pricing information could dissuade patients from seeking care after they see high prices and the prices may not accurately reflect how much they would pay. Michelle Mello, professor of law and health research and policy, is a co-author of a perspective piece here. 

Shots (NPR), 11/15/18

--Startup offers to sequence your genome free of charge, then let you profit from it
A new company allows customers to retain full ownership of their genome after it’s sequenced. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, offers insights.

Scope, 11/15/18

--In the Spotlight: At the intersection of tech, health and ethics

This In the Spotlight features Nicole Martinez-Martin, a postdoctoral fellow in biomedical ethics, who is investigating industry standards for digital phenotyping, or using information from smartphones or other devices to make health assessments. 

New York Times, 11/12/18

--Something happened to U.S. drug costs in the 1990s

Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is quoted in this piece on U.S. prescription drug spending.

Scope, 11/01/18

--Understanding AFib: Drugs and procedures to help restore a normal rhythm

In the latest installment in the series Understanding AFib, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, explains how medications, procedures and pacemakers can be used for atrial fibrillation.

October

Bloomberg.com, 10/26/18

--No wonder scientists ask statisticians to cook the data

Some statisticians report receiving inappropriate requests regarding data analysis, a new study has found. Steven Goodman, professor of medicine and of health research & policy, associate dean of clinical and translational research, and co-director of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford, provides comment in this piece.

Scope, 10/25/18

--Understanding AFib: How to measure your own heart rate and rhythm

In the latest installment in the series Understanding AFib, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, explains how to measure your heart rate and pay attention to your heart rhythm.

Scope, 10/23/18

--A deeper look at ‘Reflecting Frankenstein’

In an essay published in JAMA, medical student Nick Love discusses the meaning behind an art installation he created to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s novel FrankensteinAudrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and director of the Stanford Medicine and the Muse program, co-authored the piece with Love.

Scope, 10/22/18

--A stage IV cancer patient discusses what it means to live well with serious illness

Amy Berman, a nurse with stage IV cancer, spoke at the recent Jonathan King Lecture sponsored by the Center for Biomedical Ethics. Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, is included here. 

Scope, 10/18/18

--Understanding AFib: Slowing down the dancing heart

In the latest installment in the series Understanding AFib, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, explains different drugs that are used to slow down the heart.

Forbes, 10/11/18

--Researchers have created healthy mice from same-sex parents. But why?

Researchers in China have created healthy mice from two female parents. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, provides comment in this article.

Scope, 10/11/18

--Understanding AFib: Blood thinners simplified

In the latest installment in the series Understanding AFib, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, explains the different types of blood thinners.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 10/09/18

--How will artificial intelligence impact medical ethics?

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics and of medicine, discussed the ethical implications of artificial intelligence in medicine with guest David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics and a professor of pediatrics and of medicine.

Scope, 10/08/18

--World Bank Group leader addresses global health community at Stanford

World Bank president Jim Yong Kim shared insights from his experience at the helm of global health and financing organizations during a recent Conversations in Global Health event. Paul Wise, the Richard E. Behrman Professor in Child Health and professor of pediatrics and a core faculty member for the Center for Innovation in Global Health, interviewed Kim on stage. Michele Barry, senior associate dean for global health, is quoted in this piece.

New York Times, 10/08/18

--The importance of medical touch

This piece discusses the importance of touch in medicine and quotes Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine.

Scope, 10/04/18

--Understanding AFib: Why do I have this? Should I take blood thinners?

In the second piece of a series on atrial fibrillation, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, examines which patients should use blood thinners.

Scope, 10/01/18

--Firelight serenade: Stanford Medicine students perform at open mic

Members of the Stanford Medicine community gather at the first open mic of the quarter, for a night filled with comedy, instruments, dancing, and improvisation.

September

Scope, 09/27/18

--Understanding AFib: A heart dancing without rhythm 

In the first piece of a series on atrial fibrillation, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, explains atrial fibrillation (or AFib) and how it increases the risk of stroke.

AMA Journal of Ethics, Illuminating the Art of Medicine, 9/2018

Be sure to check out the following articles that had contributions made by members of Stanford's Center for Biomedical Ethics: 

--Nicole Martinez, PhD, Is It Ethical to Use Prognostic Estimates from Machine Learning to Treat Psychosis?

Calibrating a machine learning model with data from a local setting is key to predicting psychosis outcomes. Clinicians also need to understand an algorithm’s limitations and disclose clinically and ethically relevant information to patients.

--Holly Tabor, PhD, What Precision Medicine Can Learn from Rare Genetic Disease Research and Translation

Rare genetic disease research has something to teach precision medicine about addressing some patients’ limited access to treatment. Health disparities exacerbated by high costs and limited availability of drugs can, perhaps, be mitigated when patient activism accelerates drug development.

--Jason N. Batten, MA, How Stratification Unites Ethical Issues in Precision Health

Precision medicine creates patient subgroups to develop targeted interventions. This raises ethical issues about privacy, informed consent, and social justice. It also raises questions about cost, what to do with faulty data, and the role of genetic stratification in treating and monitoring patients.

--Nick Love, PhD, and Sam Rodriguez, MD, The Precision Portrait

This portrait of a child against a backdrop of health data suggests how a patient’s individuality can be obscured when precision medicine is used in decision making and developing target therapies.

Scope, 09/19/18

--How AI can improve end-of-life care

This post highlights a story from the current issue of Stanford Medicine magazine about a Stanford pilot program that marries technology and compassion, artificial intelligence and palliative care, so doctors can help patients die on their own terms. Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, and Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, are featured here.

Science, 09/19/18

--‘Journalologists’ use scientific methods to study academic publishing. Is their work improving science?

This piece discusses the field of journalology, which has highlighted important problems in scientific literature and triggered reforms in academic publishing. Steven Goodman, professor of medicine and of health research and policy, provides comment here.

Scope, 09/18/18

--Journal editor aims to prompt thoughtful review of ethics in precision

The American Medical Association’s recent Journal of Ethics issue edited by Jason Neil Batten is highlighted here. Batten is a fifth-year medical student and Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics graduate fellow. 

Scope, 09/17/18

--A look inside the child detention centers near the U.S. border

In this Q&A, Paul Wise, the Richard E. Behrman Professor in Child Health and professor of pediatrics, discusses his trip to the border region this summer to interview children and tour the detention centers. Nancy Ewen Wang, professor of emergency medicine, and Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, also took part. 

Scope, 09/10/18

--Opioid overdose rates highest directly after surgery, new research suggests

Following surgery, the risk of overdose from opioids is highest during the first month, according to new research from Sesh Mudumbai, staff anesthesiologist at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, and Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices.

August

SCOPE, 08/29/18

--Stanford surgeon works to improve care for civilians in conflict zones

A recent summit led by Sherry Wren, professor of surgery, focused on ensuring the humanitarian medical response in conflict zones is capable of averting preventable disability and deaths of civilians by providing modern evidence-based care. Paul Wise, the Richard E. Behrman Professor in Child Health and professor of pediatrics, was part of a panel that discussed existing trauma system care and evolving challenges.

SCOPE, 08/29/2018

--After cancer: A new way of being family

Jacqueline Genovese, assistant director of the Medicine & the Muse program, writes about her experiences forming a new kind of family after losing her sister Maria to cancer.

New York Times, 08/16/18

--Officials remove special rules for gene therapy experiments

U.S. health officials are eliminating special regulations for gene therapy experiments, saying that what was once exotic science is quickly becoming an established form of medical care with no extraordinary risks. Mildred Cho, professor of pediatrics and of medicine and associate director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, is quoted in this Associated Press piece.

Vanity Fair, 09/18

--Inside the very big, very controversial business of dog cloning

This magazine piece takes an in-depth look at dog cloning and quotes Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics.

July

Cancer Network, 07/30/18

--Guidance to clinicians with minimal backgrounds in genetics

New tools offer clinicians with little genetics experiences a guideline using genetic testing. Co-author Kelly Ormond, professor of genetics, is quoted here.

TheUpshot (NYTimes.com), 07/23/18

--A fear of lawsuits really does seem to result in extra medical tests

A new study, which looked at the health care for active-duty military, shows that the possibility of a lawsuit increased the intensity of care that patients received in the hospital by about 5 percent, without any additional benefit. Michele Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, who was not involved with the research, provides comment here.

Washington Post, 07/02/18

--From apps to avatars, new tools for taking control of your mental health

“Digiceuticals,” part of a new field of mental-health technology, are changing the landscape for people battling mental illness. Nicole Martinez-Martin, a research fellow at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment in this article.

The New Yorker, 07/02/18

--The neuroscience of pain

Researchers are developing methods to quantify pain, allowing for a greater understanding of a sensation that has long been viewed as subjective. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, is quoted here.  

June

STAT News, 06/29/18

--Are we spending too much on the dying? New research challenges this widely held view

Contrary to the belief that end-of-life care is excessive, new research shows that patients with the highest one-year mortality risk account for less than 5 percent of spending. The study also revealed that even with sophisticated algorithms, predicting life and death is difficult. Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, who was not involved with the research, provides comment in this piece.

San Jose Mercury News, 06/24/18

--Treating genetic disease: Is a cure a cut away?

This piece explores CRISPR and how genetic editing may offer new hope to those suffering from debilitating disorders. Matthew Porteus, associate professor of pediatrics; and Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, are quoted here.

Scope, 06/21/18

--Aspirin for prevention: Should you take it?

In the last installment of a series on aspirin, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, discusses factors for doctors and patients to consider about taking aspirin for prevention of heart attack and stroke. 

KQED, 06/14/1

--'Frankenstein' 200 Years Later: The Creature and Its Creator

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, is celebrating its 200th year. Audrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and director of the Medicine and the Muse program, was part of a panel discussion exploring the novel’s legacy in literature, film and science.

Scope, 06/14/18

--Aspirin for prevention: Know your risk of heart attack or stroke

In the second installment of a series on aspirin, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, discusses how to determine your risk of heart attack, strokes and some cancers.

KQED, 06/12/18

--Finding Harold

In this piece, Laurel Braitman, writer-in-residence at the Medicine & the Muse Program at the Stanford University School of Medicine, talks about an unlikely friendship.

Scope, 06/07/18

--Aspirin for prevention: A look at the potential benefits and risks

In the first installment of a new series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, discusses the pros and cons of taking aspirin for prevention of heart attack, strokes and some cancers.

Stanford Medicine press release, 06/06/18

--Most clinical trial participants find benefits of sharing personal data outweigh risks, Stanford study finds

A survey of people who have taken part in clinical trials finds that participants care more about the benefits to sciences than the risk of sharing their personal data. Steven Goodman, professor of medicine and of health research and policy, is the senior author; Michelle Mello is the lead author. 

STAT News, 06/06/18

--After malpractice caps, doctors ordered fewer invasive tests to diagnose heart attacks

New research from George Washington University has found that in states with malpractice damage caps, physicians ordered fewer tests to diagnose heart attacks than physicians in states without the caps. Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, who was not involved with the research, provides comment in this article. 

U.S. News & World Report, 06/01/18

--Should I test myself for BRCA gene mutations?

As at-home DNA-testing kits become increasingly popular, some genetic counselors and physicians have concerns that the information provided may leave consumers without a thorough understanding of their risks or alternatives. Louanne Hudgins, professor of pediatrics, provides comment here. 

May

Scope, 05/24/18

--Modern medicine is challenging the ability of doctors to listen to, bond with patients

This blog post highlights an article in the spring issue of Stanford Medicine magazine about concerns that the humanism and bond of doctor-patient relationships is suffering in modern medicine. The article features Dean Lloyd Minor; Kimberly Allison, professor of pathology; Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine; Donna Zulman, assistant professor of medicine; Kelley Skeff, the George Deforest Barnett Professor in Medicine; Tait Shanafelt, the Jeanie and Stew Ritchie Professor and chief wellness officer at Stanford Medicine; Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine; John Kugler, clinical associate professor of medicine; Alan Glaseroff, faculty member of the Clinical Excellence Research Center; Arnold Milstein, professor of medicine and director of the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford; and Ann Lindsay, clinical professor of medicine and medical director of Stanford Coordinated Care. 

The Atlantic, 05/22/18

--Can genetic counselors keep up with 23andMe?

As DNA-testing kits and applications become increasingly popular, the demand for genetic counselors to interpret the results is growing. Kelly Ormond, professor of genetics, provides comment in this piece. 

Inside Stanford Medicine, 05/21/18

--Student research symposium showcases curiosity and scholarship

This article highlights the 35th Annual Stanford Medical Student Research Symposium. Jessica Rose, professor of orthopaedic surgery and director of the Motion & Gait Analysis Laboratory at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford; Neil Gesundheit, interim senior associate dean for medical education and professor of medicine; Laurence Baker, professor of health research and policy, are quoted in this story.

NBCNews.com, 05/16/18

--Creepy ‘brain in a bucket’ study spurs medical, ethical debates

In a recent study, researchers at Yale kept pig brain organoids medically active in lab, raising some ethical concerns. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment in this piece. 

New York Times Magazine, 05/16/18

--How tech can turn doctors into clerical workers

Electronic health records may improve medicine by reducing errors and gathering information, however it weakens the connection between physicians and patients and drives physician burnout, Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, writes in this piece. Tait Shanefelt, chief wellness officer at Stanford Medicine, is mentioned.

05/10/18

--The John Etchemendy Cardinal Walk 2018

This week, Stanford BeWell hosted the 12th annual Cardinal Walk where faculty, staff and students take a break in their workday to celebrate the strong culture of wellness at Stanford by coming together for a one-mile journey around our scenic campus. This year's theme was superheroes!

Thanks to our Administrative Team, the 'SCBE Warriors', SCBE was well represented at the walk!

Check out #CardinalWalk on various social media platforms to see the conversation and photos from the event. Check out photos from the walk here!

WIRED, 05/01/18

--The dying scientist and his rogue vaccine trial

Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, is included in this piece that tells the story of a researcher who developed a vaccine intended to cure herpes without government oversight.

April

The Atlantic, 04/25/18

--What’s wrong with growing blobs of brain tissue?

Scientists use lab-grown brain organoids for research on psychiatric and neurological issues, raising ethical concerns over the potential consciousness of the cells. In an opinion piece in Nature, Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, discuss ethical issues and guidelines of human experimentation. The opinion piece is highlighted here and in articles from The Guardian (U.K.), Newsweek, and NPR

Scope, 04/25/18

--Vision, virtue and vexation at the annual Medicine and the Muse symposium

The annual Medicine and the Muse symposium took place on campus this week. Audrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System and director of Stanford’s Medicine & the Muse Program, is quoted in this post. The symposium featured performances from Stanford medical students Dillon Stull, Nitya Rajeshuni, Kevin Sun, Natalia Birgisson, Julie Barzilay, Josh Wortzel, Stephen Marcott, Aaron Wilk, and Xinyuan (Lisa) Zhang. 

Palo Alto Weekly, 04/25/18

--In sickness and in health

This piece highlights “Homo Ex Machina”, a new play that dives into the intersection of medicine, ethics and existentialism. Author Karola Kreitmair, postdoctoral research fellow in biomedical ethics, is quoted here. 

Speaking of Medicine (PLOS Blogs), 04/24/18

--Human intelligence & artificial intelligence in medicine: A day with the Stanford Presence Center

This piece includes highlights from the Human Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Symposium that took place at Stanford last week. The conference, which discussed the ways technology is transforming medicine, featured talks from Dean Lloyd Minor; Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine; and former Stanford president John L. Hennessy. The event was hosted by the Presence Center and co-sponsored by the Stanford Department of Medicine.

Scope, 04/19/18

--Symposium discusses promise and pitfalls of technology in medicine

The Human Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Symposium took place this week. The conference, which discussed the ways technology is transforming medicine, featured talks from Dean Lloyd Minor and Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine. 

STAT News, 04/18/18

--Artificial intelligence will put a premium on physicians’ knowledge and decision-making skills

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration approved artificial intelligence software that can identify a common eye disease. This opinion piece examines the relationship between artificial intelligence and medicine and quotes Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine.

Associated Press, 04/18/18

--Parenting of the future: Many embryos, each with DNA profile

In this article and accompanying video, Hank Greely and Louanne Hudgins discuss the future of conceiving children and the ethics of gene editing embryos. Greely is with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and author of the The End of Sex and the Future of Reproduction; Hudgins is a professor of pediatrics. 

CBC Radio (Canada), 04/14/18

--Frankenstein 101: What the monster teaches medical students

During this segment, Audrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and director of the Medicine and the Muse program, discussed Stanford’s 200th anniversary celebration of Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein.

Doximity, 04/09/18

--“No, first and foremost, remember to be humble"

This poem and conversation with Audrey Shafer explores the intersection of art and medicine. Shafer is a professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System and director of Stanford’s Medicine & the Muse Program.

March

Civil Eats, 03/29/18

--Inside Monsanto's day in court: Scientists weigh in on glyphosate's cancer risks

In this piece about legal proceedings regarding the chemical glyphosate, Steven Goodman, professor of medicine and of health research and policy, provides comment. 

SCOPE, 03/28/18 

--Design thinking helps Innovative Health Care Leader program participants tackle tough challenges

"The Innovative Health Care Leader: From Design Thinking to Personal Leadership,” is a one-week residential program for health care executives led by the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Business. Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, is a co-director of the course and is mentioned here.

Wired, 03/27/18

--The next best version of me: How to live forever

Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment in this piece about the ethics of synthesizing human genomes. 

Scope, 03/22/18

--Breaking down diabetes: New controversy on blood sugar lowering

In this post, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, discusses recent debate about lowering long-term blood sugar levels of patients with Type 2 diabetes. This is the conclusion in a series of nine blog posts about the disease. 

Scope, 03/21/18

--CRISPR technology offers hope for sickle-cell patients

This blog post highlights an article in the winter issue of Stanford Medicine magazine that explores the use of CRISPR in treating sickle-cell disease. Mark Mercola, professor of medicine; Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics; Matthew Porteus, associate professor of pediatrics; Stanley Qi, assistant professor of bioengineering and of chemical and systems biology; Jennifer Andrews, clinical associate professor of pathology and of pediatrics; and Mildred Cho, professor of pediatrics, are featured. 

Stanford News, 3/20/18

--Stanford researchers listen for silent seizures with "brain stethoscope" that turns brain waves into sound

Stanford researchers have developed a “brain stethoscope” that can help detect non-convulsive epileptic seizures. By converting brain waves into sound, even non-specialists can detect “silent seizures” – epileptic seizures without the convulsions most of us expect. Josef Parvizi, professor of neurology and neurological sciences, is quoted in this article. The work is also highlighted in articles from New AtlasAmerican Council on Science, and Health and News-Medical.net.

Scope, 03/20/18

--Countdown to Childx: Upcoming conference will highlight collaborative solutions in child health

Registration is now open for the annual Childx conference, a TED-style meeting focused on inspiring innovation in pediatric and maternal health. This year’s theme “Learn, Collaborate, Innovate” will feature speakers including conference co-chair David Cornfield, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass professor in pediatrics pulmonary medicine; Stephen Quake, the Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and a professor of bioengineering; Carol Dweck, the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor; and conference co-chair Heidi Feldman, the Ballinger-Swindells Endowed Professor in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The conference will be held on campus April 12 and 13. 

Scope, 03/19/18

--Advances offer new hope for stroke survivors

This blog post highlights an article in the winter issue of Stanford Medicine magazine that explores new advancements in preventing and treating strokes. Marion Buckwalter, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences; Maarten Lansberg, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences; Paul George, assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences; Amit Etkin, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; and Gary Steinberg, the Bernard and Ronni LaCroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences, are featured in the article. 

Forbes, 03/16/18

--Artificial intelligence is infiltrating medicine — but is it ethical?

Artificial intelligence can be helpful, but physicians and scientists should carefully consider ethical issues related to its use, a team of Stanford Medicine researchers wrote in a perspective piece. Senior author David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics and a professor of pediatrics and of medicine, is quoted in this article.

Scope, 03/15/18

--Breaking down diabetes: Insulin, unwelcome, but underutilized

In this post, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, offers a quick guide to pros and cons of insulin use for Type 2 diabetes. This is part of a series of blog posts discussing the disease.

StateImpact Oklahoma (NPR), 03/15/18

--People with developmental disabilities may face organ transplant bias

Research by David Magnus shows that the decision-making process for organ transplantation discriminates against patients with developmental or cognitive disabilities. Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics and a professor of pediatrics and of medicine, was interviewed in this segment. 

Research Gate, 03/14/18

--AI can improve diagnostics and help doctors make better decisions, but researchers say it also raises ethical concerns

Artificial intelligence can be helpful, but physicians and scientists should carefully consider ethical issues related to its use, a team of Stanford Medicine researchers wrote in a perspective piece. The lead author is Danton Char, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, who is featured in this Q&A. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics and a professor of pediatrics and of medicine; and Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine of biomedical data science, also contributed to the piece. 

Inside Stanford Medicine, 03/12/18

--Stanford Medicine launches exome-sequencing program for patients

The Clinical Genomics Program, which began as a pilot program a few years ago, offers whole-exome sequencing and analysis to patients with undiagnosed genetic diseases. Gregory Enns, professor of pediatrics; Louanne Hudgins, professor of pediatrics, and Euan Ashley, professor of medicine, co-medical directors of the Clinical Genomics Program, are quoted in this story.  

Scope, 03/07/18

--Why Frankenstein matters, now, to you

This blog post highlights a story in the winter issue of Stanford Medicine magazine written by Audrey Shafer that explores the lessons Frankenstein teaches about pushing boundaries in science, technology and medicine. Shafer is a professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System and director of Stanford’s Medicine & the Muse Program. To read the article published in Stanford Medicine magazine click here

Scope, 03/06/18

--Stanford Presence Center symposium grapples with balancing human and artificial intelligence in medicine

The Presence Center will be hosting a day-long symposium in April to discuss issues surrounding humans and machines in medicine. Dean Lloyd Minor will be speaking at the event. This post includes Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor; Jonathan Chen, assistant professor of medicine; and Sonoo Thadaney, executive director of the Presence Center. 

February

Stanford Medicine News, 02/26/2018

--Stanford Medicine magazine explores challenges of breaking boundaries in science

The winter issue of Stanford Medicine magazine highlights science that pushes boundaries to save lives and considers ethical questions that are a fundamental part of research.

Scope, 02/22/18

--Breaking down diabetes: Drugs for diabetes, starting with the best - metformin

This post written by Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, examines metformin, one of the best performing medications to treat diabetes. This is part of a series of blog posts discussing pre-diabetes and Type-2 diabetes.

January

Associated Press, 01/25/18

--Scientists successfully clone monkeys; are humans up next?
Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai have successfully used the cloning technique used to produce Dolly the sheep to create healthy monkeys. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment here and in articles from HealthDay News and the New York Post.
Read on Healthy Day and New York Times

The Six Fifty, 01/23/18
--Frankenstein@200: Stanford explores the futurism of a centuries-old novel
This Q&A features the Frankenstein@200 series hosted by Stanford Medicine’s Medicine and the Muse program. Audrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and founder and director of the Medicine in the Muse program, and Joshua Stanley, program coordinator for Medicine and the Muse, are included.

Scope, 01/18/18
--Breaking down diabetes: How to prevent complications
This post written by Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, examines strategies to avoid complications of diabetes. This is fifth in a series of eight blog posts discussing pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes.

IEEE Spectrum, 01/16/18

--Stanford’s AI predicts death for better end-of-life care
Stanford researchers are using artificial intelligence algorithms to predict the mortality of patients in time for palliative care physicians to identify and treat patients who could benefit from end-of-life care. This article references Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, and Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science.

Scope, 01/11/18
--Breaking down diabetes: The importance of complications
The post written by Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, takes a look at complications from diabetes and best strategies to manage them. This is fourth in a series of blog posts discussing pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes.