Faculty

Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus
Ballinger-Swindells Endowed Professor of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

Bio

Dr. Lawrence Fung an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He is the director of the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, director of the Neurodiversity Clinic, and principal investigator at the Fung Lab. His work, which focuses on autism and neurodiversity, traverses from multi-modal neuroimaging studies to new conceptualization of neurodiversity and its application to clinical, education, and employment settings. His lab advances the understanding of neural bases of human socio-communicative and cognitive functions by using novel neuroimaging and bioanalytical technologies. Using community-based participatory research approach, his team devises and implements novel interventions to improve the lives of neurodiverse individuals by maximizing their potential and productivity. His work has been supported by various agencies including the National Institutes of Health, Autism Speaks, California Department of Developmental Services, California Department of Rehabilitation, as well as philanthropy. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and MD from George Washington University. He completed his general psychiatry residency, child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship, and postdoctoral research fellowship at Stanford.
Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

Bio

Grace Gengoux, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is a Clinical Professor, Director of the Autism Intervention Clinic, and the Well-being Director within Stanford University’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Along with colleagues at Stanford, Dr. Gengoux has written a new book focused on professional well-being and practical strategies to promote resilience for providers of mental health care. Dr. Gengoux is also a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise in training parents to promote the healthy development of social skills in their children and manage challenging behavior using positive behavioral approaches. Dr. Gengoux has published peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters on treatments for autism. She has specialized training in Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT), having completed her doctoral studies under the mentorship of Drs. Robert and Lynn Koegel. Dr. Gengoux oversees the PRT group parent training program at Stanford, supervises postdoctoral fellows providing PRT clinical treatment, and has completed multiple clinical trials evaluating the effects of PRT on the social-communication competence of young children with autism. Dr. Gengoux serves as Associate Editor for the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions. Dr. Gengoux received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of California Santa Barbara and completed her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center, before joining the Stanford University School of Medicine clinical faculty in 2010.
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Professor Emeritus (Active), Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development
Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Education and of Neurology

Bio

Dr. Menon is the Rachel L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and, Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology & Neurological Sciences and Education at Stanford University. Dr. Menon is director of the Stanford Cognitive and Systems Neuroscience Laboratory, which seeks to advance fundamental knowledge of human brain function and dysfunction, and to use this knowledge to help children and adults with psychiatric and neurological disorders. Research in Dr. Menon's lab emphasizes a tight integration of cognitive, behavioral, neuroscience and computational methodologies. Students and researchers in his lab come from a wide range of disciplines, including psychiatry, neurology, psychology, neuroscience, electrical and biomedical engineering, and computer science, to conduct research in a highly interdisciplinary setting. Dr. Menon received his BSc (Honors) in physics from the Indian Institute of Technology and his PhD in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin. He did a postdoctoral fellowship in neurophysiology at the University of California, Berkeley under the direction of Prof. Walter J. Freeman, III. He came to Stanford University as a Sinclair Foundation Research Fellow and joined the faculty in 2000. Over the past two decades, Dr. Menon’s research has led to major breakthroughs in our understanding of the architecture, function, and development of these large-scale distributed human brain networks. Dr. Menon and his team were among the first to discover that the human brain is organized into specialized and interacting networks of brain regions, which has resulted in a paradigm shift in how we investigate human brain function and cognition. Virtually every psychiatric and neurological disorder has been probed with the scientific framework Dr. Menon and his team first developed. This includes discovery of the default mode, frontoparietal, and salience networks, and their functions, which have led to elucidation of how deficits in access, engagement and disengagement of large-scale brain networks play a prominent role in psychopathology, providing novel insights into brain mechanisms underlying cognitive, affective, and social function and dysfunction that cut across multiple neurological and psychiatric disorders. Dr. Menon’s research has been cited over 85,000 times, with an h-index of 121 (Google Scholar). Dr. Menon is a ISI Highly Cited Researcher in Neuroscience (2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018; ISI, Thompson Reuters), and in 2019 and 2020 he was named an ISI Highly Cited Researcher with Cross-Field impact.
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Comparative Medicine

Bio

Dr. Parker is Associate Professor and Associate Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University where she directs the Social Neurosciences Research Program and Chairs the Major Laboratories Steering Committee. Dr. Parker's research expertise is the biology of social functioning, with a particular interest in oxytocin and vasopressin signaling pathways. Her preclinical research program focuses on developing novel animal models; her clinical research program encompasses biomarker discovery and therapeutic testing in patients with neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Dr. Parker’s research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Simons Foundation, and Department of Defense, published in leading scientific journals, and featured across diverse media outlets (e.g., NPR, CBS, New York Times, LA Times, Science, Scientific American). Dr. Parker received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Michigan. She completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University and joined the Stanford faculty thereafter. She is an Affiliate Scientist at the California National Primate Research Center, an elected member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP), and a Kavli fellow of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. She has attended key opinion leader meetings at the U.S. National Academies, NIH,, and private foundations, and has held leadership roles on international animal research advisory committees (e.g., Society for Neuroscience’s CAR, ACNP’s ARC).
Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development
Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology
Professor of Pediatrics (Systems Medicine), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences