Philip DiGiacomo

Phil DiGiacomo is working on advanced MRI to study Alzheimer's micropathology and develop new biomarkers for iron and inflammation

Email: pdigiaco@stanford.edu

 

Douglas Martin

Doug is working on quantitative imaging in epilepsy

Email: dmartin7@stanford.edu

 

Michael Wang

Michael is working on descriptions of challening lumbar punctures using fluoroscopic guidance.

Email: wangmd@stanford.edu

 

Sherveen Parivash

Sherveen Parivash earned his B.S. in Neurosciences from UCLA, and his M.S. in Biomedical Sciences from Tufts University. He is currently pursuing his M.D. at Duke University. While at Stanford for a year of medical research, Sherveen is working on using experimental MRI techniques to validate and further characterize a potential clinical biomarker in chronic fatigue syndrome. He is also working on using multi-modal MRI to define patterns of injury in contact sport athletes. 

Email: nparivash@gmail.com

 

Paymon Rezaii

 

Payman has worked as a clinical coordinator on study design and recruitment for chronic fatigue syndrome, as well as working on MRI acquisition and quality control.

Email: prezaii@stanford.edu

 

Dayna Schiessler

 

Dayna is Michael's phenomenal administrator.

Email: dayna7@stanford.edu

 

Alumni

Maged Goubran received his Ph.D. in 2014 from Robarts Research Institute in London, Ontario under the direction of Dr. Terry Peters. There, he performed quantitative in vivo MRI on epilepsy patients, correlated with post-surgical specimen MRI, and finally with quantitative histology.

At Stanford, Maged has been working on correlating specimen MRI with histology, in particular advanced techniques such as CLARITY. Additionally, he has been working on microstructural imaging in sports.

Email: mgoubran@stanford.edu

 

Dr. Wei Bian received his PhD from the UC Berkeley & UCSF Bioengineering program, focusing on using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate tissue susceptibility in the human brain. Using phase and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), he studied iron-induced susceptibility contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions and cerebral microbleeds. To define the spatial relationship between microbleeds and blood vessels, he implemented a multi-echo MRI sequence to acquire images from arteries, veins and microbleeds simultaneously. He also designed a algorithm to quickly and accurately identify microbleeds automatically.

Now at Stanford, Wei is a postdoctoral fellow in the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging. He is focusing on studying inflammation in multiple sclerosis using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and effective relaxation rate (R2*) mapping with ultra-high resolution 7T MRI. His methods will expand into other disease such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and Traumatic Brain Injury. He is also working on sequence development for faster and more effective acquisitions for QSM.

Email: wei.bian@stanford.edu

 

Jonathan Leong

Jonathan did work on PET-MR in Alzheimer's

Email: leongjcs@stanford.edu

 

Scott McIntosh was an administrator for Michael Zeineh's Lab 

Email: scottm63@stanford.edu

 

Mansi first authored the 2nd paper ever written on the hippocampal endfolial pathway.

Email: parekhmb@stanford.edu