Background

Not a Cough in a Carload
Images from the Tobacco Industry Campaign to Hide the Hazards of Smoking

Diseases caused by smoking kill more than 430,000 people in the US each year. In fact, smoking is directly responsible for the majority of lung cancer cases (87 percent), emphysema cases, and chronic bronchitis cases. Even with anti-smoking campaigns and medical health disclaimers in place, many people continue to smoke or start to smoke every year. According to the American Cancer Society, 90 percent of new smokers are children and teenagers, in many cases, replacing the smokers who quit or died prematurely from a smoking-related disease. More »

Smoking and Respiratory Diseases
Facts about smoking and respiratory diseases from the Stanford Cancer Center

Diseases caused by smoking kill more than 430,000 people in the US each year. In fact, smoking is directly responsible for the majority of lung cancer cases (87 percent), emphysema cases, and chronic bronchitis cases. Even with anti-smoking campaigns and medical health disclaimers in place, many people continue to smoke or start to smoke every year. According to the American Cancer Society, 90 percent of new smokers are children and teenagers, in many cases, replacing the smokers who quit or died prematurely from a smoking-related disease. More »

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, May 25, 2007 (pdf)
Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Among Students Aged 13-15 Years -- Worldwide, 2000-2007

Breathing secondhand smoke (SHS) causes heart disease and lung cancer in adults and increased risks for sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, middle-ear disease, worsened asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth in children. No risk-free level of exposure to SHS exists.. More »

Surgeon General's report on second-hand smoke (pdf)
The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke

Smoking is the single greatest avoidable cause of disease and death. In this report, The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General, the Surgeon General has concluded that many millions of Americans, both children and adults, are still exposed to secondhand smoke in their homes and workplaces despite substantial progress in tobacco control. More »

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