Preceptors and Mentors

Faculty from six departments (Radiology, Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiation Oncology, Pediatrics, and Medicine) have come together to jointly train students from seven degree granting programs, in five departments (Applied Physics, Bioengineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Physics) and in two interdepartmental programs (Biomedical Informatics and Biophysics). See the RESEARCH Page for information on faculty reasearch.

Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
(650) 725-8551
Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Otolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery)
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center
(650) 725-8018
Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
Assistant Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering Associate Professor, Bioengineering
(650) 725-4842
Dunlevie Family Professor of Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Professor, by courts, of Bioengineering at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital
(650) 725-2297
Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-H&NS, of Neurology, of Neurosurgery & of Radiation Oncology at the Stanford University Medical Center
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering
(650) 725-2309
Assistant Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center
(650) 498-4485
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering
(650) 723-7577
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
(650) 724-0361
Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)
(650) 723-5591
Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
(650) 498-5368
John and Jene Blume - Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
(650) 723-4733
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
(650) 723-8310
Associate Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center
(650) 723-8463
Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering
(650) 723-0718
Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center
Professor of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
(650) 723-8146
Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Labratory)
(650) 724-1195
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Medical Informatics) and of Electrical Engineering
(650) 724-9286
Addie and Al Macovski Professor in the School of Engineering
(650) 723-4533
Reid Weaver Dennis Professor
(650) 723-4569
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
(650) 721-6230
Associate Professor of Biology and of Applied Physics
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Assistant Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Radiology at the Stanford University Medical Center
(650) 725-5544
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
(650) 723-8697
Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology
(650) 723-5575
Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)
Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center
(650) 498-1481
Jacob Haimson Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
(650) 498-7896
Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)
(650) 736-6172

Norbert Pelc, ScD, Director
Professor, Department of Radiology
Professor and Chair, Department of Bioengineering

Dr. Pelc has been active in diagnostic imaging research for more than 40 plus years.Although he is best known for his work in Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), he has also worked in nuclear medicine, x-ray, and ultrasound imaging. During his graduate training, he was one of the first to work in "fully 3D" PET. His early contributions in CT include theoretical research on quantum noise and practical work including the first demonstration of "bone detail" reconstructions and illumination of the source of several image artifacts. In the early 1980's Dr. Pelc's research included high impact work on digital and dual energy x-ray imaging. In MRI, he contributed to the development of hardware systems, including quadrature excitation and advanced transceivers, to imaging methods including cardiac cine, MR angiography, respiratory compensation, single and half-NEX imaging, and motion studies based on velocity mapping. He worked on hybrid imaging in collaboration with Drs. Butts Pauly, Fahrig, and Daniel, especially x-ray/MR systems for guiding minimally invasive procedures.

Recently, his interests have returned to CT imaging. Computed tomography has made phenomenal technical advances since its introduction in the early 1970s. As an example, Fig 4 shows the progress in clinical CT scanning speed since the earliest systems. Fig4Figure 4. Evolution of CT speed This, combined with improvements in spatial and contrast resolution, have made CT a powerful tool in diagnosis and management of patients. The growth in the utilization of CT is evidence of its success. However, even though the dose per slice is decreasing, the dose to the population is significant, which is roughly half of that due to natural sources, has raised concerns. While the benefits from clinically indicated CT exams far outweigh any risk from radiation, it is prudent to reduce CT radiation dose as much as physically possible, and NIBIB has encouraged the scientific and medical community to develop further reductions in CT radiation dose. Dr. Pelc has contributed to this effort in several ways. He developed the concept of “inverse geometry” CT, a system design that can lead to improved volumetric imaging and significant dose reduction through precise control of the x-ray field illuminating the patient, but is very difficult to implement.

More recently, his group proposed a more feasible way to achieve the dose reduction, through control of the illuminating field using a dynamic piece-wise linear pre-patient attenuator comprising triangular wedges (“dynamic bowtie”, Fig 5). Fig5Figure 5. Dynamic bowtie Computer simulations predict that a dynamic bowtie can reduce dose by 30-40% in conventional studies and even more in exams where only a fraction of the in-plane field of view is of clinical interest. With funding from NIBIB, an initial feasibility model is being built and tested (Fig 5). Of importance to the current proposal, these projects led to the dissertations of 4 PhD students.

Along with his excellent research track record, Dr. Pelc is a highly regarded teacher of both pre-doctoral and post-doctoral trainees (including physicians). Dr. Pelc was the principal advisor of 14 PhD students, 11 of whom have completed their studies. He has been the primary or co-advisor of 17 postdoctoral fellows. His students have gone on to successful careers in academia and industry in roughly equal numbers. They have won recognition for their research with awards that include two ISMRM Young Investigator winners, five RSNA research fellow prizes, and one AAMI Young Investigator award. Dr. Pelc has served on the admissions committees of two degree-granting programs at Stanford (Bioengineering and Biophysics) and has been a secondary advisor or on the thesis committees of many doctoral students. He has advised graduate students in six degree granting programs (EE, ME, BioE, Physics, Applied Physics, and Biophysics) at Stanford, an indication of his experience and ability to work closely with the programs and departments that are linked to the training program.

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