Lunch & Dinner Seminars (Winter 2020)

Content will be continually updated

This page is currently being updated as courses get added. Continue to check back throughout the fall. Please reach out to SMSA VP Operations if you have any questions. 

Monday

Day/Time Course Code Course Name Course Description Course Location Contact Information
M 12:30-1:20P PSYC 277 Psychiatry and Behavioral Science Perspectives in Medicine This course explores psychiatry topics through the perspectives of attending psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, and other specialists in behavioral health. Some examples of topics are advances in interventional psychiatry, psychopharmacology, and psychotherapy; the interplay between social issues and mental healthcare; and other matters affecting the modern practice of psychiatry. Attendance and exam not required for medical students. Alway M112 david.james@stanford.edu
M 12:30-1:20P MED218SI Diabetes 101 for Healthcare Providers Diabetes is an extremely high-prevalence disease, that you will likely encounter on a consistent basis regardless of your medical specialty, so learning about the practical aspects of treatment is extremely useful. This course is designed to teach these practical skills about diabetes care, treatment and the latest research in the field. Great food, practice at step 1 style questions and diabetes-related memes and gossip. What’s not to love? CCSR 4205 jdt2015@stanford.edu
M 12:30-1:20P OBGYN 216 Current Issues in Reproductive Health The course will cover a range of topics in reproductive health including but not limited to: adolescent sexual health, high-risk obstetrics, contraception, abortion, LGBTQI+ healthcare and access to care, global issues in reproductive health, maternal mortality, infertility and assisted reproductive technologies & more! LK308 ppara@stanford.edu
M 12:30-1:20P MED 242 Physicians and Human Rights Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva. Alway M114 harikak@stanford.edu
Jan. 13, Feb. 10, Mar. 9 (5:30-7pm) Spring quarter sessions will be held same time and room (5:30-7pm, Alway M112) on Apr. 13 and May 11 (second Monday of each month). INDE 240 Humanistic Medicine How do our own unique identities as healthcare practitioners intersect with those of our patients? Our colleagues? This year-long, dinner seminar series (8 sessions total from Sep-May, 3 during fall) is designed to use story, narrative, and interactive activities to engage MD and PA students across difference to provide meaningful opportunities to appreciate the diverse identities represented among the student body - and build an overall inclusive learning environment grounded in acceptance and humility for each other's lived experiences. This 1-unit course counts toward the Community Health Scholarly Concentration. Alway M112 candicekim@stanford.edu

Tuesday

Day/Time Course Code Course Name Course Description Course Location Contact Information
Tues 12:30-1:20pm PSYC 225 Stanford Klingenstein Fellowship Program A mentoring program designed to expose first and second year medical students to the rewarding field of child and adolescent psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child and adolescent mental health issues. Offers a year-long program wherein medical students are paired with child and adolescent psychiatrists, meeting bimonthly for clinical experiences and mentoring. Also provides opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking opportunities, and opportunities to attend professional conferences. Winter Quarter will be focused on children ages 6-12yo. Enrollment in 2 or more quarters of Klingenstein earn you the title of Klingenstein Fellow. For more information, please contact Dr. Anita Kishore at akishore@stanford.edu LK208 vinshiv@stanford.edu; jimmyz1@stanford.edu
Tues 12:30-1:20pm EMED 134/234 The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing patients and physicians. This weekly lunch seminar aims to introduce medical trainees to selected topics in climate change, such as climate and diseases, climate-smart health care delivery, and advocacy.The course will feature speakers who are leaders in this emerging domain, as well as patient perspectives on climate and illness.  Alway M106 jasngomz@stanford.edu

Wednesday

Day/Time Course Code Course Name Course Description Course Location Contact Information
Wed 5:30-7:20PM FAMMED 216 Caring for Individuals with Disabilities  Engaging evening seminar with panels, workshops, discussions and expert speakers focusing on how to care for individuals with disabilities. Partner program pairs students with individuals with disabilities in the community!  LK308 Rwsapp@stanford.edu

Thursday

Day/Time Course Code Course Name Course Description Course Location Contact Information
Th 12:30-1:20PM INDE 215 Queer Health and Medicine  This course explores specific, pertinent, and timely issues impacting the health of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer+ (LGBTQ+) community; examines the role of primary care physicians in addressing
the health care needs of this community. Guest lecturers provide a sexual and gender-sensitive approach to medical care of the LGBTQ+ patient, breaking down homophobic barriers and reaffirming patient diversity.
Alway M112 (except 2/27 LK120) stefanick@stanford.edu 
Th 12:30-1:20PM NENS 204 Stroke Seminar Standing at the intersection of many fields of medicine, including neurology, internal medicine, cerebrovascular surgery, diagnostic and interventional radiology, and emergency medicine, stroke is a critical topic for all practitioners of medicine and is the third leading cause of death and disability. This seminar draws upon Stanford's leaders in stroke research to present and discuss the causes, presentation, treatment, and imaging characteristics of the disease.Free food! Run by SIGN and NSIG. Donate us a credit if you have one to spare so we can offer more food - attendance not taken! Varies between Alway M114, LKSC 304, Alway M212 (See weekly emails) arwang@stanford.edu csh47@stanford.edu
Th 12:30-1:20PM ORTHO 220 Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results. MSOB X303 jimmyz1@stanford.edu; bhpham@stanford.edu
Th 12:30-1:20PM RADO 110SI Current Topics in Oncology  Lunch seminar on topics in oncology. Usually in Alway Sfalkson@stanford edu
Th 6:30-7:30PM MED248 Student Rounds  Dinner seminar where current clinical students lead the class through a recent clinical case, emphasizing teaching points that correspond with the material being covering in preclinical courses LK 308 mariav@stanford.edu

Friday

Day/Time Course Code Course Name Course Description Course Location Contact Information
F 12:30-1:20PM SURG 234 Service Through Surgery: Surgeons with an Impact Surgeons with an Impact is a weekly lunch seminar course with guest lectures and facilitated workshops with the following objectives: 1) Participants will be able to understand the role of surgeons in addressing health inequities, social justice, and poverty, 2) Participants will be exposed to the potential of expert surgeons through lectures from diverse professionals, 3) Participants will reflect on how addressing inequities can align with their career goals in surgery. Health justice topics covered will include: surgery and global health, advocacy and trauma surgery, transplant justice, inequities in pediatric surgery, serving veterans through surgery, accessing surgical obstetrics and gynecology care, women in surgery, LGBTQ advocacy and surgery, and race and surgery; as well as diversity among surgeons themselves. Course open to MD and PA students only. Alway M106 antoniac@stanford.edu
F 12:30-1:20PM MED 200 Primary Care Presentations This lunch seminar involves patient case presentations in internal medicine and various subspecialties. During each session, course directors Dr. Lars Osterberg or Dr. Wendy Caceres presents case information (history, physical exam, labs, imaging, other diagnostic data) to a faculty discussant who has not seen the case before the session. Faculty discussants sequentially work through the case, allowing students to benefit from the discussant's clinical reasoning in real time. This course allows students to hone their diagnostic skills and learn clinical pearls that will help during rotations. Alway M114 candicekim@stanford.edu

Weekend

Day/Time Course Code Course Name Course Description Course Location Contact Information
Saturday/Sunday Morning