Dissociated Patterns of Anti-Correlations with Dorsal and Ventral Default-Mode Networks at Rest.

Previous studies of resting state functional connectivity have demonstrated that the default-mode network (DMN) is negatively correlated with a set of brain regions commonly activated during goal-directed tasks. However, the location and extent of anti-correlations are inconsistent across different studies, which has been posited to result largely from differences in whether or not global signal regression (GSR) was applied as a pre-processing step. In this study, we examined anti-correlations of different subnetworks within the DMN during rest using both seed-based and point process analyses, and discovered that: (1) the ventral branch of the DMN (vDMN) yielded significantly weaker anti-correlations than that associated with the dorsal branch of the DMN (dDMN); (2) vDMN anti-correlations introduced by GSR were distinct from dDMN anti-correlations; (3) PCC/precuneus seeds employed by earlier studies mapped to different DMN subnetworks, which may explain some of the inconsistency (in addition to preprocessing steps) in the reported DMN anti-correlations.  

Correlations/Anti-correlations with respect to the dorsal and ventral default-mode network, under different de-noising processes. 

Correlations/Anti-correlations with respect to different posterior cingulate cortex seeds employed by previous studies (a-e).

Chen JE, Glover GH, Greicius MD, Chang C. Dissociated Patterns of Anti-Correlations with Dorsal and Ventral Default-Mode Networks at Rest. Human Brain Mapping. doi:10.1002/hbm.23532.