Research Management Group (RMG)

Department of Energy
Office of Science
Office of Biological and Environmental Research

Systems Biology Enabled Research on the Role of Microbial Communities in Carbon Cycling


**New $750K-$3M (total costs over 3 yrs) DoE funding opportunity for Stanford faculty with PI eligibility for –omics driven basic research on the contribution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes and microbial communities to carbon cycling processes in terrestrial ecosystems**

Download the guidelines >>   PDF
The guidelines were downloaded by using the FedConnect fedconnect.net public search function with "Systems biology".


Timeline:

Pre-applications (required*): March 4, 2013, 5 p.m. ET via PAMS >>
Full application (by invitation):   April 19, 2013, 11:59, p.m. ET via grants.gov
*Only those applicants that receive notification from DOE encouraging a formal application may submit full applications.


Eligibility: Stanford faculty with PI eligibility


Amount of funding:
$250,000 to $1M total costs per year for up to 3 years
Applicants may request project support for up to three years, with out-year support contingent on the
availability of funds, progress of the research, and programmatic needs.
Supplemental Funding for Collaboration with the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (see below >>)
Cost sharing is NOT required.


Purpose:

Applications are solicited for –omics driven basic research on the contribution of prokaryotic and
eukaryotic microbes and microbial communities to carbon cycling processes in terrestrial
ecosystems in the following areas:

  • i. Systems biology studies on regulatory and metabolic networks of microbes,
    microbial consortia, and microbe-plant interactions involved in biogeochemical
    cycling of carbon.
    Proposed studies should focus on systems biology research using
    model microbes or microbial consortia that are relevant to large scale carbon cycling
    processes in terrestrial ecosystems. Model systems should be carefully chosen to facilitate
    development of metabolic and regulatory network models that could ultimately inform
    larger-scale biogeochemical models of microbial processes in the environment.
  • ii. Development of –omics approaches to investigate microbial community functional
    processes involved in carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.
    Applications should
    address the adaptation of genome-enabled techniques (e.g., metagenomics,
    metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics) to the interrogation relevant functional processes
    of microbes in terrestrial environments, either at field sites or using model
    micro/mesocosms, and integrate resulting data into process understanding at the
    ecosystem scale. Applications are encouraged that target key microbially-mediated
    carbon cycling processes in terrestrial systems to predict responses to shifts in
    temperature, CO2 concentration, or other climate change variables.
  • iii. Development of –omics enabled methods and technologies for imaging and analysis
    of microbially-mediated carbon cycling processes in terrestrial ecosystems.
    New
    approaches are needed for high-resolution characterization of microbial community
    structure and function in soils and other terrestrial environments. Applications are
    encouraged that will enable in situ analysis of functional processes of microbial
    communities and characterization of physical and chemical microenvironments at
    interfaces between microbes and biotic or abiotic surfaces (e.g., plant roots, soil
    aggregates, etc.)

Applications focusing on model organisms or communities that are of limited relevance to
understanding global scale carbon cycle processes are not encouraged. Applications primarily
focused on metagenomic sequencing are not encouraged for this FOA and should instead be
directed to the DOE Joint Genome Institute’s Community Sequencing Program. Applications for
research that would result in incremental advances on current understanding or technology are
not encouraged. BER encourages the submission of innovative "high-risk/high-reward" research
applications that address critical knowledge gaps and have the potential for high impact. The
probability of success and the risk-reward balance will be considered when making funding
decisions.


NOTE: Supplemental Funding for Collaboration with the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase:

Applicants addressing one or more of the three topical areas listed above may also apply for
additional supplemental funding of up to $300,000 per year for development of systems biology
and –omics data driven applications in collaboration with the DOE Systems Biology
Knowledgebase in the following areas:

  • Development of dynamic regulatory and metabolic networks methods to support largerscale biogeochemical models of microbial processes in the environment relevant to community response to climate change variables.
  • Microbial community scale –omics data integration and data visualization tools relevant to understanding major carbon cycle processes and compatible with the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase.


Resources

Grants.gov@Stanford resources:
http://ora.stanford.edu/grantsgov/default.asp


Shared Facility/Service Center Resource

You are encouraged to discuss shared facility, service center, core facility resources with Bruce Koch, Senior Director, Discovery and Technological Service Centers, Office of the Senior Associate Dean for Research at bruce.koch@stanford.edu.


Institutional Representatives

You must be prepared to submit your proposals via eSubmit for your institutional representatives* at least 5-working days** prior to the full application receipt deadline. You are encouraged to notify your RPM as soon as possible if you are invited to submit a full proposal so he/she can begin to generate your budget and assist with other aspects of your application.
*Medicine: RPM Assignments by department: http://med.stanford.edu/rmg/rpmmaster.html
*Other schools: OSR assignments: http://ora.stanford.edu/ora/osr/contact.asp



Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: