Small Grant Program

The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Small Grant Program, launched in 2015, was designed to promote research and collaborative scholarly projects advancing the academic interests of our faculty and the strategic themes of our department. 

Awards include Pilot Studies in novel scientific areas that have high potential to lead to competitive grant applications and Small Scholarly Projects related to education, clinical care, community outreach, and health systems issues, such as health care quality.

Application Details for the FY2018 Small Grant Program

We are pleased to announce the request for proposals to the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Small Grant Program, which was initiated in 2016. This program is designed to promote research and collaborative scholarly projects advancing the academic interests of our faculty and the strategic themes of the Department. Projects across the full spectrum of science and scholarship are encouraged.

Two types of applications will be considered:

Pilot studies in novel scientific areas that have high potential to lead to competitive grant applications (budget: up to $25K)

Key Dates

11/1/17: proposals due

12/8/17: awardees notified

1/15/18: funding begins

6/15/18: midterm report

1/15/19: final report

Small scholarly projects related to education, clinical care, community outreach, and health systems issues, such as health care quality (budget: $2K-­‐$10K). Based on feedback at the June 2017 Department retreat and ongoing faculty committee recommendations, we particularly welcome small scholarly project proposals which focus on the following themes:

  1. Well-being of members of the department community, including faculty, staff, learners, and other stake-holders.
  2. Mentorship
  3. Best practices in suicide prevention
  4. Engagement with Law Enforcement around issues of Mental Illness
  5. Mental health of LGBTQ communities
  6. Quality improvement in clinical services

Eligibility Criteria

  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences faculty on the Medical Center Line (MCL), University Tenure Line (UTL), and Non-Tenure Line (NTL), Clinician Educators (CE), Clinical Instructors, and Instructors are invited to apply.  Please note that PI waivers are not required for this funding opportunity.
  • Each faculty member and Instructor can serve as PI on only one application.
  • Graduate students, residents, fellows, postdoctoral scholars, and research associates are encouraged to apply with the leadership of a PI-eligible faculty or Instructor mentor.
  • Multiple PI projects are permitted, but one individual must be designated as the project leader for ease of communication. The project leader must have their primary appointment in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.
  • Affiliates are eligible to apply in collaboration with a member of the faculty at one of the ranks above.


Applicants should propose projects that are feasible and may be completed within one year. Priority will be given to applicants without other sources of discretionary funds.

Awardees will be notified on or before December 8, 2017 with funding to begin on January 15, 2018.

Selection Process

A review committee will evaluate proposals based on scientific merit, feasibility, relevance to departmental priorities, likelihood to lead to future research opportunities/funding, and the strength of the PI and investigative team.

Requirements

Recipients will be required to write a preliminary report (1 page) at the midpoint and a final 4-page report at termination. Publications resulting from the work should acknowledge the department Small Grant Program. Once the winning projects are announced, it is the PI’s responsibility to directly consult with Stanford’s Institutional Review Board to ensure that the proposed project is conducted in accordance with all federal, institutional, and ethical guidelines applicable to human subject research.  Recipients will be asked to present a poster at the June 2019 Department Wide Department Retreat or present at other appropriate venues.

APPLICATION GUIDELINES

By midnight, November 1, 2017, please submit one PDF file (File name: “Lastname_2018_SmallGrantProgram.pdf”) containing the following in the order listed below via the online application.

All proposal applications should use at least 11-point font size, 1-inch margins for all pages, with standard word and single line spacing.  Pages should be numbered consecutively at the bottom right. The page header should contain the name of the Project Leader and a short title. The budget should reflect the period of time funds are requested and can include salary (including PI and research personnel with corresponding fringe benefits including TGP), equipment, project supplies, food, and support for community collaborations. The budget may not include faculty honoraria. Funds cannot be directed to subcontracts or to discretionary accounts. Please note that the School of Medicine has a mandatory 3% telecommunications charge on all salary. Indirect costs are not applicable.

Pilot Study applications

6 pages maximum

  • 1-page cover detailing: title of the project; names, titles, emails of all investigators; amount of funding requested; one sentence summary of the proposal; statement of salience for strategic themes and/or academic missions of the Department. 
  • 3 pages outlining project aims, rationale, study design and methods, preliminary data (if applicable), and no more than 6 references (no more than ½ page)
  • 1-page budget and budget justification
  • 1-page investigator biographies and description of project team. These can be hyperlinked to longer form University profiles.

Small Scholarly Project applications

5 pages maximum

  • 1-page title of the project; names, titles, emails of all investigators; amount of funding requested; one sentence summary of the proposal; statement of salience for strategic themes and/or academic missions of the Department.
  • 2 pages outlining project aims, approach, and anticipated outcomes.
  • 1/2-page budget and budget justification
  • 1/2-1 page investigator biographies and description of project team. These can be hyperlinked to longer form University profiles.

 

Proposals that do not conform to the above guidelines will be returned without review.  All grants will be scored, but detailed feedback will not be provided to the applicants.

Please direct all inquiries to:

Kyle Lane-McKinley, Program Manager
kylemck@stanford.edu  |  (650)721-1883
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford School of Medicine

Funded Projects by Year

Pilot Studies

  • Sarah Adler, Psy.D.   
    Analysis of Measurement Based Care Data to Inform Clinical Decision-Making: Building the Model
  • Cara Bohon, Ph.D.   
    Abnormal Perceptual Processing as a Maintaining Mechanism of Body-Image Disturbance in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: Identifying a Novel Treatment Target
  • Weidong Cai, Ph.D.   
    Dynamic Brain States and Connectivity in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Its Relation to Intra-Individual Variability and Clinical Symptoms
  • Erin Cassidy-Eagle, Ph.D.   
    Activate! Training Primary Care Providers in Behavioral Activation Therapy for Older Adults with Depression
  • Grace Gengoux, Ph.D.   
    Parent Training to Enhance Social Success for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Hadi Hosseini, Ph.D.      
    Integrating Virtual Reality and NIRS Neurofeedback for Improving Executive Function in ADHD
  • Ranak Trivedi, Ph.D.      
    Determining the Interdependence of Stress and Physical Activity Among Patients and Their Informal Caregivers
  • Debra Safer, M.D.           
    Assessing the Feasibility and Acceptability of a Parent-Based Intervention to Reduce the Risk of Obesity in Children of Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Small Scholarly Projects

  • Sepideh Bajestan, M.D., Ph.D.   
    Patient-Centered Clinical Neuroscience Training to Facilitate the Communication with Challenging Neuropsychiatric Patients
  • Victoria Cosgrove, Ph.D.
    Assessing Need for Psychosocial Support in Families with a Child Undergoing Treatment in the Bass Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases at LPCH
  • Christina Tara Khan, M.D., Ph.D.
    Integrating Mental Health into Primary Care in Rural Guatemala Through Task Shifting to Public Health Clinic Physicians
  • Philippe Mourrain, Ph.D.
    Pharmacological and Genetic Interrogation of Circuit Dynamics in the Parkinsonian Brain
  • Oxana Palesh, Ph.D., M.P.H.
    Ingrid Oakley-Girvan, Ph.D., M.P.H.

    Does Improving Sleep Modify Potentially Relevant Clinical Biomarkers Among Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy?
  • Jennifer Phillips, Ph.D.
    Development of a Measure of Social Motivation in Autism

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