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Postdoctoral Research Training Fellowships in Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology

Didactic Courses

 

  1. Research Application and Funding
    The aim of the course is to introduce the fellows to various sources of funding and types of grant, and to the art of grant writing particularly focused on the K-award. The course is conducted in the Winter quarter each year. After an organizational session, two sessions are devoted to funding sources and to a detailed presentation on applying for a K-award. These sessions are followed by presentations from each fellow encompassing either a research plan, a report of their ongoing research, or an idea for a grant application such as the K-award. Fellows are encouraged to write a Specific Aims page for their project for discussion in the seminar. At each presentation, the fellows and faculty offer constructive criticism of the plan, or the ongoing research. Hence, the seminar covers research design, issues of participant recruitment, entry characteristics, methodological issues, statistical issues, ethical issues, the presentation of study results and conclusions, all in ways directly relevant to a particular research topic. Fellows also gain skills in the presentation and interpretation of data. In addition, each fellow is exposed to a variety of different research topics and methods, and it is not unusual for collaborations between fellows to emerge from such presentations. 

  2. Responsible Conduct of Research (MED 255)
    This course is offered during the Fall, Winter and Spring and is required for all Fellows. The Responsible Conduct of Research course is designed to engage participants in productive discussions about ethical issues that are commonly encountered during their research careers. This course is required for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who are supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, and many departments and programs also recommend this course as part of their curricula. A class schedule can be found here.

  3. Methodology of Research in the Behavioral Sciences (PSYC 250)
    Psyc250 focuses on methodological issues in three major psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research, neuroimaging research, and genetic studies taught over three quarters. The Fall Quarter series is designed as an overview of statistical and methodological issues in clinical psychiatric research, with an emphasis on longitudinal data analysis.  The Winter quarter covers basic and advanced methodologies in neuroimaging research focusing specifically on data analysis methods. The Spring quarter addresses both statistical genetics and general statistical modeling in genetics.

Program Leadership

Principal Investigator
Co-Principal Investigator

Program Faculty

Faculty in the training program represent a broad range of research areas and disciplines. A representative list of faculty with expertise in basic and clinical research is below. Applicants may also propose to work with mentors that are not on the list.

Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center
John A. Turner Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
D. H. Chen Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Psychiatry and of Behavioral Sciences
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center
David Starr Jordan Professor
Professor of Psychology
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Esther Ting Memorial Professor
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)
Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Professor of Biostatistics in Psychiatry, Emerita
Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Biomedical Data Science
Walter E. Nichols, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics
Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology
Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System
Professor of Neurosurgery
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology
Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Neurobiology
Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor in Medicine
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

Application Details

Requirements

M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. applicants must have completed an approved residency program. M.D. and M.D./PhD applicants should have completed clinical training in psychiatry, behavioral neurology, or behavioral pediatrics. In specific circumstances, clinical training credit for the PGY-4 year may be arranged.

Ph.D. applicants must have completed:

  1. an APA- or CPA-accredited graduate program
  2. an APA- or CPA-accredited internship
  3. all requirements for their Ph.D. prior to beginning their appointment.
  4. Applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents.

To Apply

Before applying, candidates must contact a program faculty or other faculty listed on the departmental website to discuss potential mentorship in their area of interest.

You will be asked to provide information and upload 2 PDF files:

  1. A cover letter specifying a clearly identified area of interest and indicating a specific mentor(s). Please also include in the cover letter the names of the three individuals you have asked to provide letters of recommendations
  2. Curriculum Vitae

After you complete the application, the three individuals you listed as references will receive an automated e-mailed with instructions for uploading the letters of recommendation (as PDF files). It is suggested that one letter be from your proposed mentor at Stanford.

The application deadline is January 6, 2020.