In the News

Toolkit for providing mental health care to Muslim patients launched

A toolkit that seeks to help clinicians provide culturally and religiously informed mental health care for Muslim patients was officially launched at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association.  Rania Awaad, clinical assistant professor, and Belinda Bandstra, clinical associate professor, sat down  to discuss how to use the toolkit and why it – and other resources on providing nuanced mental health care – are needed.


Using Esketamine Nasal Spray for Treatment Resistant Depression

An ongoing debate over the risks and benefits of recently approved esketamine nasal spray for treatment-resistant depression took place at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting. Alan Schatzberg, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, is mentioned in this article.


Coordinated Teams, Collaboration Are Key to Supporting People With Psychosis

A coordinated specialty care model can most effectively address early psychosis, but it’s also important to involve the patient and their family members when making treatment decisions. Jacob Ballon, clinical associate professor, is featured in this piece.


Creativity can jump or slump during middle childhood, a Stanford study shows

A new Stanford neuroscience study reveals that creativity can slumps or bumps between ages 8 and 10, depending on the individual. Manish Saggar, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.


5 Questions: Shaili Jain on misconceptions about PTSD

In this Q&A, Shaili Jain, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the explosion of knowledge about post-traumatic stress disorder and the condition’s widespread impact. PTSD is the subject of her new book, The Unspeakable Mind: Stories of Trauma and Healing from the Frontlines of PTSD Science. Additional coverage: Reports From The Frontlines Of PTSD Science and PTSD: A conversation with a Stanford psychiatrist about her new book


Vanished in Paradise: The Untold Story (A&E), 05/16/19

This program explores dissociative fugue, a rare form of amnesia in which the person forgets consciously various aspects of their identity. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, will be featured.  


Why an Indonesian rehab center doesn't insist on abstinence

This piece profiles an addiction rehabilitation center based on harm reduction, an approach that doesn't focus on sobriety. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, provides comment.


In the Spotlight: Understanding sex differences

In this In the Spotlight Q&A, Daniel Bayless, a postdoctoral fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, talks about his research on sex differences.


Artificial intelligence and the future of sleep medicine

Machine learning could revolutionize sleep medicine by taking over the diagnostic process, identifying gaps in care, and helping predict CPAP adherence even before therapy begins. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted in this article.


Spotlight: American Tragedy: A New Film Puts The Need For Youth Mental Wellness On The Big Screen

In April 2019, Stanford faculty, staff and members of community organizations all concerned with the mental wellness of young people gathered to view a new documentary called "American Tragedy: Love Is Not Enough," based on lessons learned from the 1999 Columbine High School shooting.


Medical experts divided on pot as opioid substitute

With medical marijuana now available in Ohio, the state’s cannabis industry is increasingly billing the drug as an alternative to opioid painkillers. This piece discusses how the medical community is divided on the use of marijuana as a painkiller and regarding addiction treatment. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.


Cool Science Radio - featuring Dr. Shaili Jain

Shaili Jain, clinical associate professor (affiliated) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was interviewed about her new book, The Unspeakable Mind — Stories of Trauma and Healing from the Frontlines of PTSD Science.


Big Pharma has a big role on the federal committee tasked with curbing opioid abuse

This piece discusses the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force, a federal committee created to advise prescribers on how to treat pain and when to use opioids. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.


Study finds that routine pediatrician-administered screenings could flag autism earlier than other methods

A failure to hit key developmental milestones could signal risk for autism sooner. Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved in the research, is quoted in this article.


The long and winding road to mental health care for your kid

Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, is quoted in this article that discusses the limited access to psychiatrists and therapists.


Common brain injury in premature babies may be tied to specific cells

Using a lab model, Stanford researchers have identified a type of developing brain cell that is affected by exposure to low oxygen levels. The work was led by Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Anca Pasca, assistant professor of pediatrics.


Sleeping pills: A risk of car crashes, gunshot wounds and Jason Bourne amnesia

The FDA is now requiring that the most commonly prescribed sleeping pills carry a notice that these meds may be a lot more dangerous than people realize. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford University Center for Human Sleep Research, provides comment in this article.


Breadth of student research showcased at annual symposium

Sixty medical students presented a broad array of projects at this year’s Medical Student Research Symposium. Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner, MD, Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and colleagues are quoted in this story.


Hormone reduces social impairment in kids with autism

In a Stanford study of 30 children with autism, intranasal vasopressin improved social skills more than a placebo, suggesting that the hormone may treat core features of the disorder. Karen Parker, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the lead author, and Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author. The research is covered here and by Scientific American, Cosmos, GizmodoHealthDay News, The Scientist, Science and others.


Stanford CHIPAO (Communication Health Interactives for Parents of Adolescents and Others) Performances

Stanford CHIPAO recently held two events in San Ramon and San Francisco, and included performances by Shashank Joshi, Joanne Lee, Steve Sust, Mamatha Challa, Laura Villanueva, and Rona Hu.  These performance were covered by the World Journal and Sing Tao Daily.


'Manic Monologues' seeks to disrupt the stigma around mental illness

A recent performance on campus featured monologues about the lives of people with mental illness. Rona Hu, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is on the play’s advisory team and is quoted in this story.  This performance was also featured in World Journal.


Black imprisonment rates are down. It’s important to know why

This piece, co-authored by Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the decline in the imprisonment rate for African Americans.


Genetic roots of psychiatric disorders clearer now thanks to improved techniques

New technology and access to large databases are fundamentally changing how researchers investigate the genetic roots of psychiatric disorders. This post highlights a recent commentary written by Laramie Duncan, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, that explains how genome-wide association studies have demonstrated the inadequacy of previous methods.


How Muslim Americans Are Fighting Mental Health Stigma

As people in the Muslim American community continue to face distinct challenges related to mental illness and stigma, advocates and mental health professionals are working to come up with solutions. Rania Awaad, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article.


Philosophy Talk: Is Philanthropy Bad for Democracy?

Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about the intent of donations made by the Sackler family, owners of Purdue Pharma, the makers of the opioid Oxycontin.


City Visions: Reforming California's drug rehabilitation industry

In this segment, Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, and others discuss California’s drug rehabilitation industry. 


Roadside Testing For Pot: What Can Be Measured And Where The Tech Stands

In this segment, Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses marijuana legislation and saliva tests for intoxication.  


Tips for discussing suicide on social media — A guide for youth

New guidelines offer teens and young adults practical tips on how to safely and constructively interact on social media about suicide. Vicki Harrison, program director for the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, discussed this new online education tool for teens and young adults — developed in collaboration with a youth advisory panel — in a recent Healthier, Happy Lives Blog post.


Cancer patients using alternative therapies may hesitate to tell doctors

A new survey has found that many cancer patients may be using non-standard therapies and not informing their doctors. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved in the work, is included here.


'The Manic Monologues' puts a spotlight on mental illness

An upcoming performance on campus will feature monologues about the lives of people with mental illness.  Rona Hu, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences is quoted in this article and by the Washington Post.


The Science of Aromatherapy

People are increasingly depending on aromatherapy, the use of scents, to improve their mental or emotional well-being. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the legitimacy of essential oils as a mental health tool.


The Youth Mental Health Centers that Don’t Look the Part

Redesigning the help-seeking experience to feel welcoming and free of judgment, regardless of where young people are in their journey.

As of August 2018, Santa Clara County Behavioral Health Services—in collaboration with the Stanford Psychiatry Center for Youth Mental Health & Wellbeing—secured state approval to use $15 million to open two integrated youth mental health clinics. But they’re probably not what you’re picturing.


A New Tool Helping Youth Safely Discuss Suicide Online

New guidelines for safe online interaction about suicide have recently been introduced in the United States. Originally developed and released in Australia by Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, #chatsafe: A Young Person’s Guide for Communicating Safely Online About Suicide was adapted for the U.S. through a collaboration with The Jed Foundation (JED) and the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences’ Center for Youth Mental Health & Wellbeing. The #chatsafe guidelines are the world’s first to be informed by evidence, and developed in partnership with youth.  Vicki Harrison, program director for the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, explains the need for such online education and support in this post.


Working Out Is Powerful Brain Training

Exercise not only promotes physical fitness, but mental well-being as well. Experts chime in on how pushing your body to the limit can be beneficial in overcoming challenges and building resilience. Jacob Ballon, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Douglas Noordsy, director of sports psychiatry, and Jeffrey Christle, clinical exercise physiologist, are interviewed for the article.


Media coverage of violent events is found to fuel a cycle of stress

A new study has found viewing media coverage of traumatic events may fuel long-term distress. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor, who was not involved with the study, provides comment on how our brains process images of traumatic events.


Orygen and The Jed Foundation Launch #chatsafe in the U.S., First Evidence-Based Guidelines to Help Young People Talk Safely Online About Suicide

Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, in collaboration with the Stanford Psychiatry Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, and The Jed Foundation (JED) announces the U.S. launch of #chatsafe: A young person's guide for communicating safely online about suicide.  


Can AI improve access to mental health care? Possibly, Stanford psychologist says

In this Q&A, Adam Miner, instructor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences and co-director of Stanford’s Virtual Reality-Immersive Technology Clinic, discusses the future of psychiatric artificial intelligence, including the challenges and potential benefits for AI-based mental health assessment.


Running Makes My Stress Melt Away, So I Asked a Doctor If There’s Actually a Link

Experts say exercise in general improves not only improves your physical health, but your mental health as well. Douglas Noordsy, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of Sports Psychiatry, comments on how running helps with stress relief.


CPAP brings longer life for obese people with sleep apnea: Study

Researchers report the use of the CPAP mask may greatly increase chances for a longer life for obese patients. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford University Center for Human Sleep Research, who was not involved with the study, provides comment in this HealthDay News article.


Stanford scientists help parse molecular changes in astronauts

NASA and collaborating institutes including Stanford conducted a study that examined the molecular and genetic differences between two twin astronauts — one twin spent a year in space, the other remained on Earth.  The work is featured in an Inside Stanford Medicine article, which includes Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor in Sleep Medicine and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral science, as well as colleagues in the School of Medicine.

 


If Waking Up Is the Worst Part of Your Day, Try This Sleep Doctor's 1 Simple Trick

The article describes how to wake up in the morning without it being a nightmare. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains how to wake up more energized and refreshed without any devices.


Alexa in the #MeToo era: How to protect sensitive disclosures to digital assistants

This opinion piece, written by Adam Miner, instructor in the psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Steven Asch, professor of medicine, discusses home-based digital assistants and data sharing for sensitive disclosures.


Cannabis plus opioids in chronic pain: Not a great combo

This article discusses a survey that looked at mental health and pain outcomes when marijuana and opioids are both used. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved with the study, provides comment here.


Minds Wide Open Wins Three New York Festivals TV & Film Awards

The Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute (TCCI) announced that Minds Wide Open has received three awards from the 2019 New York Festivals TV & Film Awards: two Gold World Medals - one in the Science & Technology Documentary category and the other for best Branded Documentary Production, and one Bronze World Medal in the Feature Documentary Film Category. Since its debut on the Discovery Channel in September 2018, the 60-minute documentary commissioned by TCCI’s cofounders has now won seven awards: the awards announced today, three Cannes Corporate Media & TV Gold Awards and a Gold Standard Award from Public Affairs Asia. Earlier this month, Minds Wide Open was also short-listed for a 2019 Brand Film Festival London Award.

Among the scientists featured in the film are four faculty in our Department and members of the Stanford Neuroscience Institute at Stanford University - Laura Roberts, Karl Deisseroth, Sergiu Pasca, and Nolan Williams. Our gratitude to Brandon Gregg and Julie and Violet Walters for sharing their stories.


Global Mental Health, Trauma, and the Law

In April’s episode of the AJP Residents’ Journal Podcast Series, Matthew Edwards interviews Daryn Reicherter, Clinical Professor and Director of the Stanford Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program - an interdisciplinary collaboration in law, medicine and global health on human rights issues and trauma violations internationally to inform policy, influence law, and provide restitution and mental health resources to survivors.  


Ketamine a panacea for resistant depression? Not so fast, experts say

This piece discusses the use of ketamine for severe depression. Alan Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, offers insights and context.


Thirst and drinking spark widespread activity in the mouse brain

This piece highlights new Stanford research led by Karl Deissoroth that identifies the cells involved in thirst and satiety. Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.


Biology may make certain PTSD patients unresponsive to behavioral therapy

Clinicians may be able to determine whether people with post-traumatic stress disorder will respond to psychotherapy by analyzing a key brain network and memory, according to Stanford researchers. Amit Etkin, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences is lead author, and Ruth O’Hara, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, the study’s senior author.


Myths vs. facts: Stanford psychiatrist discusses schizophrenia

This post highlights a recent article in which Jacob Ballon, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the myths and facts about schizophrenia.


Schizophrenia: Popular Myths, Real Facts

It’s estimated that more than two and a half million people suffer from schizophrenia in the U.S. The article separates fact from fiction about the debilitating disorder. Jacob Ballon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and co-director of the INSPIRE Clinic, corrects some of the myths of the misunderstood mental illness.


How to deal with a cancer diagnosis

In this piece, experts share what patients and families can do to manage anxiety after a cancer diagnosis. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor and director of the Center on Stress and Health at Stanford University School of Medicine, is quoted here.


The opioid epidemic is increasingly killing black Americans. Baltimore is ground zero.

As Baltimore sees an increase in drug overdose deaths, city officials are trying to take steps to get people into care. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this story.


America's sleepless nights: In pursuit of rest

A lack of sleep can take a serious toll on health, leaving individuals more vulnerable to infection and boosting the risk of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, mood disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted in this article.


From cringeworthy to scary: a history of anti-drug PSAs

This piece, which also appears as part of the podcast The Uncertain Hour, highlights the recent history of advertisements intended to keep teens off drugs. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.  


National study to train mHealth on college depression, anxiety

A study will test the effectiveness of a mobile health platform designed to help college students dealing with depression, anxiety and eating disorders. C. Barr Taylor, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is included here.  


Translating horror into justice: Stanford psychiatrist advocates for human rights

A Stanford interdisciplinary program provides evidence of the mental health pathology caused by trauma to legal teams prosecuting human rights violators. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is director of the program.


Aspiring doctors seek advanced training in addiction medicine

This piece discusses how the opioid epidemic has spurred a new generation of doctors who are committed to treating addiction. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, is quoted here.


My Temporary Hoarding Habit

The writer describes her temporary hoarding habit of collecting condiments and medical supplies as her young daughter was hospitalized for cancer treatment. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Hoarding Disorders Research Program, provides comment.


Here’s an Idea: Sleep

The podcast looks at the emerging market of sleep technology and which are more hype than help. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed on what role tech plays in getting a good night’s sleep.


Could Party Drugs Really Help Cure Depression?

The broadcast looks at the recent FDA approval of a ketamine nasal spray for depression. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the potential side-effects of long-term use.


Long known as a party drug, ketamine now used for depression, but concerns remain

The FDA recently approved a new ketamine nasal spray for treatment for depression. But physicians are wary about potential long-term effects. Alan Schatzberg, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are interviewed for the article.


On Prophetic Wisdom and Speaking to Children in Times of Distress

Rania Awaad, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes in this piece about the need to engage our children and teens in their moments of distress and avoid shying away from discussing difficult topics.  


Expressing Myself Through Clothing Has Helped Me Deal With Depression

The story explores how clothing could have an effect on the perceptions and reactions of others, as well as one’s mental health. Elias Aboujaoude, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about the compulsive nature of buying clothes.


Ronn Owens Report: The Sleep Expert, Dr. Rafael Pelayo

Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about a number of sleep issues, including how much sleep a person needs and how to get a good night’s rest.


In push for marijuana legalization, 2020 Democrats side with industry

Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, pens an op-ed piece on a Senate bill to remove marijuana from the federal Controlled Substances Act.


Daylight Saving Time Could Be Hazardous To Your Health

Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, was interviewed about how daylight saving time could be detrimental to people already sleep-deprived.


What’s Causing the Opioid Crisis

This segment discussed the opioid crisis. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was featured.


Doctors Welcome New Depression Drug, Cautiously

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved — with safeguards — the nasal spray medication esketamine for use against severe depression. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.


Directing the gaze: A discussion of writing, psychiatry and criminal justice

Author and psychiatrist Christine Montross discussed her work and read excerpts from her books at the recent Annual Pegasus Physicians Lecture at Psychiatry Grand Rounds on campus.


What makes the ketamine-based drug for depression so different?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week approved — with safeguards — the nasal spray medication esketamine for use against severe depression. Alan Schatzberg, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, offers insights and context in this article.


Good news: opioid prescribing fell. The bad? pain patients suffer, doctors say

In a letter sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 300 health-care experts told the agency that its landmark guidelines for the use of opioids against chronic pain are harming patients who suffer from long-term pain and benefit from the prescription narcotics. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, declined to sign the letter, and provides comment in this article.


Virtual reality hypnosis cuts post-op pain, anxiety in kids

Virtual reality hypnosis can reduce the need for postoperative opioids and anti-anxiety medications and lead to improved outcomes in children, new research suggests. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor, who was not involved with the study, is quoted in this article.


FDA approves ketamine-like drug for severe depression

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week approved — with safeguards — the nasal spray medication esketamine for use against severe depression. Alan Schatzberg, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, offers insights and context.


The opioid dilemma: Saving lives in the long run can take lives in the short run

Limiting prescriptions seems logical, but a simulation study shows it would actually increase deaths, not decrease them, in the initial years. The study was conducted by Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; graduate student Allison Pitt; and Margaret Brandeau, the Coleman F. Fung Professor and a professor of management science and engineering. Humphreys is quoted in this article.


Suicide and other “deaths of despair” are vexing, but preventable, speakers say

At a recent Stanford Health Policy Forum moderated by Paul Costello, senior communications strategist and advisor, researchers Anne Case and Rebecca Bernert discussed suicide in the United States. Bernert is an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and founding director of the Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory at Stanford.


Shortage of antianxiety drug leaves patients in the lurch

The antianxiety medication buspirone is in short supply, creating a challenge for doctors and patients. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.  


Mom, when they look at me, they see dollar signs

This magazine article reports on the “Florida shuffle,” a cycle wherein recovering opioid users are aggressively recruited to questionable rehab programs in an effort to fill beds and collect insurance money. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment here.


Melatonin: Range of Effects and Therapeutic Applications

Melatonin is known to help regulate circadian rhythm and sleep-wake cycles. The article details melatonin dysfunction and related treatment implications. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.


Two Stanford professors elected to National Academy of Engineering

Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was among 86 new U.S. members — two from Stanford — elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He is quoted in this article, which also outlines his work developing molecular and optical tools for discovery and control of neuronal signals affecting behavior in health and disease.


Good friends are good for you

This article discusses the connection between health and friendship. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor, provides comment.


Brain response to mom’s voice differs in kids with autism

Mom’s voice causes a strong response in the brains of typically developing children, but the response is weaker in children with autism, a Stanford study has demonstrated. Daniel Abrams, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is lead author, and Vinod Menon, the Rachel L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author of the study.


Tens of thousands of Americans die each year from opioid overdoses

This piece examines the roots and the future of the opioid crisis in the U.S. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences is mentioned here.


Stanford’s WellMD Center blazes a trail to promote joy in medicine, combat burnout

Stanford Medicine’s WellMD Center and other efforts to combat physician burnout are described in this Q&A with Bryan Bohman, who is senior advisor to the center and a clinical professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine. Also mentioned is Mickey Trockel, the center’s director of scholarship and health promotion and a clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.


Oxycontin Lawsuit: Massachusetts Sues Sackler Family

This segment discussed the lawsuit in Massachusetts against Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and its owners. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was interviewed.


For parents of ill children, a growing recognition of PTSD

This piece discusses post-traumatic stress among parents of children with life-threatening medical conditions. The work of Richard Shaw, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned here.


Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia: Gaps in Treatment and Research

More than half of people with schizophrenia experience negative symptoms which can lead to resistance to treatment and worse outcomes. Jacob Ballon, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about the gaps in treatment and the need for more research.


What It’s Like to Be So Sleep Deprived That You Hallucinate

The article takes a look at how sleep deprivation and exhaustion can lead seeing things that aren’t actually happening or real. Emmanuel During, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains how the brain processes these hallucinations.


Club Drug Ketamine Nears FDA Approval for Depression Treatment

The article takes a look at the effectiveness of ketamine infusion therapy for mental health conditions like depression. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is also interviewed for the story.


Spotlight: Mental Health Front of Mind at 2019 World Economic Forum: Stanford Team Presents Mental Health Advancements Utilizing “Precision Psychiatry”

The theme of the 2019 World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, was “Globalization, 4:0: Shaping a New Architecture in the Age of the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution.’” The term, handily shortened to 4IR, was coined to describe the confluence of the physical, digital and biological, and how technologies in these realms are combining to alter the human experience.


US attorney releases new antiopioid TV and radio ads

US Attorney Andrew E. Lelling has released a series of television and radio public service announcements intended to raise awareness about the dangers of opioids. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.


Do sleep-specific, blue light glasses, actually help you fall asleep?

Exposure to blue light after dark, from screens and monitors, can disrupt your natural sleep patterns and make it harder to fall asleep. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.


Do you sleep long hours? Many experts say it’s benign, but others aren’t sure.

This piece discusses “long sleepers” —people who regularly sleep as much as 10 to 12 hours a night, unrelated to any medical conditions. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, provides comment here.


After opioids, benzodiazepine use raises concern

There is a growing awareness that benzodiazepines are being improperly prescribed for chronic use, despite their high risk of addiction. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned here.


Former pediatrics resident will be California’s first surgeon general

Former Stanford pediatrics resident Nadine Burke Harris will be sworn in by Gov. Gavin Newsom as California’s first-ever surgeon general on Feb 11. This post outlines her career, including comment from Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, who has known and collaborated with Burke Harris for more than a decade.


Linking narcolepsy to the flu? Researchers make progress identifying molecular mimicry

In very rare cases, a flu infection or flu vaccine can trigger an immune reaction leading to narcolepsy. Stanford researchers led by Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, have figured out why. Mignot is quoted in this article.


Targeting opioid scripts may have little effect on epidemic

Dose limits, prescribing guidelines, prescription drug monitoring programs, and similar interventions will have a "modest effect, at best" on the number of opioid overdose deaths in the future, a mathematical model has projected. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.


Shortage of Anti-Anxiety Drug Leaves Patients Scrambling

A sudden, nationwide shortage of a common drug that treats anxiety and panic attacks, is spreading concern among patients and physicians. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and chief of the Anxiety and Disorders Section, comments on the lack of alternatives to buspirone.


A third of Americans are sleep-deprived. This technology could help them rest easier

Artificial intelligence could help improve sleep studies, some researchers believe. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, provides comment in this story.


8 New Travel Experiences to Achieve Mindfulness in 2019

The article looks at how mindfulness plays a factor when planning a vacation. David Spiegel, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Center for Integrative Medicine, comments on the importance of de-stressing of resetting your brain.


Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia

This piece discusses the use of cognitive behavioral therapy — a type of therapy that aims to modify harmful behaviors, emotions and thoughts — to treat insomnia. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted.


Male mice hard-wired to recognize sex of other mice

Stanford researchers have identified the brain circuitry that enables male mice to quickly identify the sex of an unfamiliar mouse. Because mice and humans share some of the same hard-wired circuitry, the finding may also apply to humans. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurobiology, is senior author of the study.


Spotlight: Stanford Psychiatry Faculty Among the Most Highly Cited in the World

We are proud to celebrate 7 faculty members in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences who have been included in Clarivate Analytics 2018 Highly Cited Researcher’s list – a testament to the breadth, scope and impact of their work.


How To Find The Therapist That’s Right For You

It’s estimated that only 41 percent of people with a mental illness and 63 percent of people with a serious mental illness have received counseling in the last year. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about how to find a therapist that’s a good fit.


Steep climb in benzodiazepine prescribing by primary care doctors

A new study has found that the percentage of outpatient visits that led to benzodiazepine prescriptions doubled between 2003 and 2015. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who wasn't involved in the study, is quoted here.  


Moms of the dead from drugs: "Where is the outrage for us?"

Mothers who have lost sons and daughters to opioid addiction are mobilizing and working to help each other. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.  


For veterans working in US federal prisons, PTSD and government shutdown is a 'disaster waiting to happen'

Correctional officers, including veterans, were required to work without pay during the federal government shutdown, even if they had previously approved time off. Shaili Jain, clinical associate professor (affiliated) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, offers comment here.


Scientists generate, track development of myelin-producing brain cells

A team of Stanford researchers led by Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, have produced oligodendrocytes, the brain cells that make myelin, using a system that cultures balls of stem-cell-derived human brain cells.


Many not sleeping enough – or well enough – and that's a killer

This piece discusses the dangers of sleep deprivation. Seiji Nishino, emeritus professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.


Then There's California - CA State Senator Jim Beall and Stanford's Steven Adelsheim (ep. 7)

Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joined Senator Beall on this podcast to talk about some bold new mental health legislation being proposed in California.


It’s the late, late, late show at the Australian Open

This piece discusses the late-night scheduling of matches at the Australian Open. Norah Simpson, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who studies the role of sleep on athletic performance, provides comment here.


Why the price of pot matters to us all: How to improve on Cuomo's legalization framework

Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, provides comment here on the risks of marijuana price collapse and how rock-bottom prices could expand heavy use and starve tax revenues in New York if marijuana is legalized.


Why dining with friends makes you eat less: You're less interested in the food on your plate

Researchers led by Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, have demonstrated that direct stimulation of fewer than two dozen neurons linked to social interaction was enough to suppress a mouse’s drive to feed itself, a finding that has implications for the treatment of eating disorders. The work is featured in the Daily Mail and in a Stanford Medicine press release.


Overdose deaths tied to antianxiety drugs like Xanax continue to rise

As public health officials tackle opioid addiction and overdoses, another class of prescription drugs, benzodiazepines, has been contributing to a growing number of deaths across the United States. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, is quoted in this article.


Is your personality ruining your sleep?

New research connects five personality types with a propensity for insomnia. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, provides context and discusses approaches for relieving insomnia.


Excessive body fat around the middle linked to smaller brain, study says

A new study suggests body fat may affect brain volume. Cara Bohon, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved with the study, provides comment in this article.


Deeper learning

New technology and improvements in machine learning are providing insight into psychiatric disorders. Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured here. 


This new app turns opioid users' phones into overdose detectors

Researchers have developed a smartphone app that can potentially detect a reduction in breathing due to an overdose and send out an alert. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved with the research, is quoted here.  


Mistaken identity: Influenza/narcolepsy autoimmunity link confirmed

New research led by Emmanuel Mignot has confirmed that an antigen in some variants of the flu virus and vaccine can, in rare cases, trigger an autoimmune response leading to narcolepsy. Mignot is the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine.


Should You Quit Drinking For Dry January?

A major public policy push in England of abstaining from alcohol is gaining popularity around the world.  Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, weighs in on the benefits of Dry January.


Mental Health Experts Worry Digital 'Open Grade Books' Are Stressing Kids Out

The story reports on "open grade books" - online portals that allow both parents and kids to get up-to-the-minute progress reports. Steven Adelsheim, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Stanford University, provides comment.


The Sound of Silence

The story reports on the proliferation of white noise generators, digital devices and apps, that are marketed for better sleeping environments. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains why we are wired to differentiate sounds as we sleep.


How to Handle Awkward Health Questions During the Holidays

This Epilepsy Advocate blog piece discusses dealing with questions about a chronic illness that might come up during holiday parties and family gatherings. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.


Smoking weed: When is someone too high to drive?

This Kaiser Health News piece discusses how doctors are struggling how to measure if and to what extent marijuana causes impairment. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.


Adolescent Tech Use and Health Impact: Expert Roundtable

The article takes a deep dive into how increasing use of technology is affecting the mental health of today’s adolescents. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director the OCD Clinic, participates in a roundtable discussion about ethical dilemmas that clinicians may face when dealing with teens and technology.


The One Word You Shouldn’t Say To Someone With Anxiety Or Depression

The article looks at how the word ‘just’, as in just calm down or just relax, can do more harm than good for people with anxiety and depression.  Amy Alexander, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, offer advice on how to better phrase your support.


12 ways to show up for a friend with bipolar disorder

Manpreet Singh, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Program, offers suggestions here for friends of those with bipolar disorder.  


Medical students turn to peer-support groups for assistance: A Q&A

In this Q&A, Dina Wang-Kraus, a psychiatry and behavioral sciences resident, discusses Ears 4 Peers, a peer-to-peer support program she co-founded for Stanford medical students.


Many say ketamine eased their depression, but is it safe?

This HealthDay News piece explores the use of ketamine to treat depression. Alan Schatzberg, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, provides comment.


ODPP in Fiji Applauded For Setting Precedent In Rape Ruling

Documenting the first time a rapist has been jailed for life by courts in Fiji, this article outlines the role the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions and expert witness Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program.


‘A moral disaster’: AP reveals scope of migrant kids program

In this piece, the Associated Press reviews the current data related to migrant children in the United States. Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences,  whose work addresses the impact of early life stress, is quoted.


A doctor’s guide to what to read on the opioid crisis

This piece highlights a selection of books about the opioid crisis and includes “Drug Dealer, MD,” written by Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic.


How bad is it to take an antihistamine to sleep every night?

For ongoing sleep problems, an antihistamine or other over-the-counter medicine isn't the best choice, physicians including Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, say in this piece.  


Why Researchers Say You May Want to Smoke Marijuana Than Vape It

A recent study of out Johns Hopkins University reveal that vaping marijuana delivers a more powerful punch than smoking it. Dr. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the potency.


T Cell Receptors Involved in Narcolepsy and Immune Response to Flu Identified...Spoiler alert: Wash your hands

Emmanuel Mignot, Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences writes about a major step in our understanding of the sleep condition narcolepsy: the discovery of specific immune cells that have receptors recognizing both hypocretin and specific strain of flu, in this Thrive Global piece.


The case for raising the alcohol tax

This piece explores how a higher alcohol tax would save lives, prevent crime, and mostly affect excessive drinkers. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.


Transcranial Magnetic Brain Stimulation to Treat Depression and OCD: Interview with Stanford’s Dr. Nolan Williams

In this interview, Nolan Williams, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses his lab’s use of TMS for the treatment of depression and OCD, and the general status of this field.


This Device May Be Key to Finding Out Why You Aren’t Sleeping...So you can finally get eight hours of rest.

In this Thrive Global piece, Emmanuel Mignot, Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in  psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the future of machine learning to facilitate the diagnosis and monitoring of sleep disorders such as narcolepsy and sleep apnea.


Improving PTSD care through genetics

In this Q&A, Laramie Duncan, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses her research on the relationship between PTSD and genes.


How can you tell if therapy is actually working?

In this piece, a psychiatrist explains the nuances of improvement and success for people undergoing psychotherapy. Kristine Luce, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Riley Cropper, a clinical psychologist, offer insights.


I was my dad’s caregiver through his fatal illness. I had no idea I’d be at risk for PTSD.

Taking on the role of a caregiver for a loved one with a serious illness can put a person at risk of developing PTSD. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece.


The heartbeat seat: Demoing new well-being technologies in a car 

As part of a story for Stanford Medicine magazine, science writer Hanae Armitage tested out new technology that's meant to keep drivers more relaxed. The magazine piece focuses on work by Pablo Paredes, an instructor in radiology and in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who is leading an effort rooted in "digital mindfulness," which harnesses technology to create and enhance a positive mental state.


More are seeking mental health care, but not always those who need it most

A new report shows more people are receiving mental health services, but not those with the most serious psychiatric problems.Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this HealthDay News article.


What Holiday Depression Really Feels Like

For some people with clinical depression, the holidays can be unbearable. Amy Alexander, clinical assistant profession of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains why it can be stressful.


Early Career Acceleration Awardees Named

Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was named a Ben Barres Investigator by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. This Early Career Acceleration Award, named for the late Stanford neuroscientist, supports early career academic investigators, especially those who are new to the field of neurodegeneration. The 5-year, $2.5 million award will support his work in the development of 3D organoid systems from human induced pluripotent stem cells with the aim of developing novel strategies and tools for modeling brain maturation and neurodegeneration with patient-derived cells.


Do supervised drug consumption facilities save lives?

A new RAND Corporation review examines the efficacy of supervised drug consumption facilities. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, breaks down its findings in this piece.  


 “Know Your Value” event December 1 in San Francisco

Carolyn Rodriguez, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joined MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski, leading experts, and influential trailblazers (including Mira Sorvino, Natalie Morales, and Lisa Borders) for an event on December 1st designed to help women at all career stages recognize, and be recognized, for their personal and professional value by developing and inspiring their individual growth.  Dr. Rodriguez presented on a panel “Feeling It: Bringing Your Whole Best Self to Work.”


New Proof Surfaces That Family Separation Was About Deterrence and Punishment

This article discusses the predictable harms to children by forcible family separations that are also detailed in a new article written by Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences—recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine.


U.S. life expectancy declines again, a dismal trend not seen since World War I

Annual statistics released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed drug overdoses and suicides contributed to a decline in U.S. life expectancy. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece. The data is also highlighted in a piece on The Upshot (NYTimes.com), which quotes Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic.


How brain injuries deprive people of a sense of free will

An examination of brain-imaging studies of people with alien limb syndrome and akinetic mutism suggests that some components of free will rely on a network of regions in the brain, rather than any one area. Amit Etkin, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was not involved in the research, but offers insight in this.article.


US waived FBI checks on staff at growing teen migrant camp

This investigative piece reports on staffing inadequacies and other problems at a migrant detention camp holding more than 2,300 teens in a remote area of Texas. Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here on how the conditions could affect the emotional and psychological well-being of the teens.


Sexual harassment goes high tech with iPhone’s AirDrop

Some iPhone users are received lewd and threatening photos via AirDrop, especially in crowded, public spaces. Helen Wilson, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on how the sexual harassment can trigger distress for survivors of sexual assault.


Investing in doctor wellbeing is just good business, Stanford study finds

Maryam Hamidi, research professional in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is lead author  of a study published in BMC Health Services Research that shows that in addition to the high human costs of burnout, the financial costs to medical institutions are significant as well. Mickey Trockel, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral science is the senior author.


Sleep On It!

Logan Schneider, clinical instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides input on the importance of sleep to retain new learning, provide better patient care and prevent burnout.


This city’s overdose deaths have plunged. Can others learn from it?

Dayton, Ohio, had one of the highest overdose death rates in the nation in 2017. This piece discusses how the city made many changes, and fatal overdoses are down more than 50 percent from last year. A Stanford study by Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; graduate student Allison Pitt, and Margaret Brandeau, professor of management science and engineering, is referenced here.


America’s health-care system is making the opioid crisis worse

This piece explores opioid addiction and deaths in New Jersey. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment about recent federal legislation.


Should health-care workers press charges against violent patients?

This piece discusses violence from patients and how health-care workers face a complicated question after an assault — Should they press charges? It’s possible to prosecute, but such a move can be a difficult decision for doctors like me and others, writes Nathaniel Morris, a resident in psychiatry and behavioral sciences.


Music and Sleep Study

Dr. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about a new British study that shows music can help you fall asleep for a good night’s rest.


Why Sleep Paralysis Feels Like a Waking Nightmare

The article looks at what happens to your body when sleep paralysis occurs, the health conditions and sleep disorders that trigger it, and what treatments are available. Dr. Logan Schneider, clinical instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed for the story.


More than the ‘baby blues’

This article discusses postpartum depression and maternal mental health. Katherine Williams, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who leads Stanford Medicine's Women's Wellness Clinic, is quoted here.


Why Some Are More Likely To Smoke

While the rate of tobacco use among Americans has declined overall, the habit still disproportionately affects the poor. During this segment, Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, discussed how smoking shifted from a habit of the rich to a burden on the poor.


The FDA just approved an opioid 10 times more powerful than fentanyl

Despite criticism and concerns, the FDA has approved Dsuvia, a new opioid 10 times more powerful than fentanyl. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, is quoted in this piece.


What we’ve learned about the effects of weed since it was legalized

Many questions remain about how marijuana affects the human body and behavior; data is also lacking about the public health ramifications of legalization. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, provides comment.


Should hem/oncs recommend integrative therapies to their patients?

In a point-counterpoint article, David Spiegel, medical director of the Center for Integrative Medicine, addresses the need for integrative therapy in conjunction with traditional cancer treatment.


Your smartphone may know more about your mental health than you

Amit Etkin, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses in this piece how  mood is a complex and hard-to-define entity, making it difficult to self-report on and treat, and how objective measurements related to smartphone technologies and capabilites may improve management of mental illness in the future.


Ultrasound releases drug to alter activity in targeted brain areas in rats

Stanford researchers have developed a noninvasive way of delivering drugs to within a few millimeters of a desired point in the brain. Senior author Raag Airan, assistant professor of neuroradiology, is quoted in this release. Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved in the research, also provides comment here.


Why the ‘right’ polices to resolve opioid epidemics change over time

Because epidemics are dynamic, the impact of any new policy can change dramatically over time, writes Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, in this piece. The work of graduate student Allison Pitt and Margaret Brandeau, professor of management science and engineering, is also referenced here.


Stanford physicians outline potential negative health effects of detaining immigrant children

A team of physicians has explained the negative effects of the current approach for the treatment of immigrant families and outlined suggested improvements. Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of community research programs for Stanford Medicine's Early Life Stress and Pediatric Anxiety Program, is quoted in this blog post.


Stanford professor gives expert evidence in rape case

Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Human  Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program was recently welcomed by the Director of Public Prosecutions, Christopher Pryde in Suva. He was in the country for four days following an invitation from the DPP to give expert evidence in a rape case in the High Court (State-v-Peni Vukici).  Fiji Sun Times also covered the case (read the story here: Expert: State-v-Peni Vukici Rape Case Was One Of The Worst He Has Ever Seen).


Opioid use disorder vastly undercounted: Massachusetts study

This piece discusses new research that found far more Massachusetts residents suffer from opioid use disorder than has previously been understood. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, who was not involved with the study, is quoted.


America's Opioid Epidemic

This segment examined the opioid crisis in America. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, was interviewed.


How sleep works: The reasons why we can’t live without it

This segment explains the importance of sleep, the factors that play into why we wake up tired and how to feel more rested. William Dement, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences-emeritus, is interviewed about the history of sleep and what happens when we sleep.


Sleep Deprived

The special report looks at the most common sleep disorders, and the health consequences that go along with being sleep deprived. Mark Buchfuhrer, sleep specialist with the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center, is interviewed about the symptoms of restless leg syndrome and available treatments (time 22:26-25:35).


Trump signs opioid bill, father who lost son says we need a bigger ‘Band-aid’

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump signed a bill that will expand access to certain kinds of opioid treatment. During this segment, Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, discussed how this bipartisan measure could help in the battle against opioid addiction as well as where it falls short.


Drug overdose deaths decline for sixth straight month

Drug overdose deaths in the United States have now fallen for six straight months, according to the CDC’s most recent data, dropping 2.8 percent from their peak. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, provides comment in this article.


Trump claims on opioid crisis met with mix of skepticism and hope by experts as deaths plateau

Coverage of opioid-related news, including a recent drop in drug overdose deaths, a new report on the public health emergency declaration from the Government Accountability Office, and a look at soon-to-be-enacted federal legislation meant to address the issue. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, provides comment in each piece (The Atlantic and Vox).


LeBron James has turned the NBA into the ZZZ

With so many NBA stars playing on West Coast teams, fans on the East Coast must contend with sleep deprivation if they want to watch their favorites play. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford University Center for Human Sleep Research, provides comment in this story.


NOVA: ADDICTION

This segment on addiction featured numerous experts including Robert Malenka, the Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and deputy director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, and Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic.


Professional guidance needed to detect mental health issues

Leading experts discussed challenges in early detection of mental health problems and why professional help is essential during an interaction at the 16th Hindustan Times Leadership Summit. The panel had Dr. Shekhar Saxena, visiting professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and David Spiegel, Willson professor and associate chair of of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine.  


Daniel Mason’s Winter Soldier probes a troubled doctor’s psyche

This article profiles physician-author Daniel Mason, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and highlights his third novel Winter Soldier.


I tried hypnotherapy to stop eating sugar — here’s what happened

This piece discusses hypnotherapy and quotes David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor.


Spotlight: Still on the Journey to Wellness Equality: The Mental Health Parity & Addiction Equity Act of 2008

It’s been a decade since the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act was signed into law, but it has a long way to go before its mandate guaranteeing equal health coverage for your brain as your body is fulfilled. 


How fentanyl is contaminating America’s cocaine supply

Fentanyl has been the leading killer of the opioid epidemic and is now making its way into illegal stimulants, such as cocaine. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor, provides comment in this story.


What one devastated community can teach the world about mental health

A year after the devastating wildfires in Sonoma County, this piece explores how living through the natural disaster has affected the mental health of residents. Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, talks about her research on the subject in this article.


A DNA test claims to tell you how you’ll respond to depression medications. Here’s what scientists think of it.

This piece examines a wave of new DNA tests that are designed to determine how well a given depression medication will work with a patient’s genetic makeup. Alan Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and director of the Stanford Mood Disorders Center, weighs in on how helpful the tests are in practice.


Considering the challenges posed by technology that tracks whether you took your meds

Each new digital health development comes with cautions as well as benefits. This post highlights a new paper on ethical considerations of emerging medical technologies. Laura Dunn, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and an author of the paper, is quoted.


Opioid-benzo overlap higher in patients using multiple health systems

Receiving drugs from more than one health care system was tied to a greater risk of overlapping prescriptions for opioids and benzodiazepines, a cross-sectional study showed. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, who was not involved with the research, is quoted in this article.


Pain doctors, advocates urge curbs on “forced opioid tapering”

Last week more than 100 health care professionals and pain care advocates signed a letter urging the Department of Health and Human Services to prohibit or minimize rapid, forced opioid tapering in outpatients. The letter was signed by a number of School of Medicine faculty including Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.


Why Are So Many More Children Being Diagnosed With ADHD Today?

John Leikauf, instructor of psychiatry, talks about ADHD, or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, one of the most common mental health conditions among children in the U.S. And the diagnosis rate of this brain disorder - characterized by a difficulty focusing attention, restlessness, and impulsive behaviors—appears to have increased over the past 20 years, according to a new study published in JAMA.


Meet the Silicon Valley CEOs spending millions of dollars to hack their own bodies

A growing number of entrepreneurs and CEOs are trying biohacking to maximize performance, but health experts and researchers are skeptical of many of these experimental methods, and say that some may be doing more harm than good. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this story.