In the News

  • Scope

    Sleep deprived? A healthy diet can help - Scope

    Improved nutrition — and access to healthy foods — can reduce the effects of sleep deprivation in physicians, new Stanford Medicine research suggests. Maryam Hamidi, social science researcher, and Mickey Trockel, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are authors.

  • Changing the Face of Yoga

    Stimulus - Yoga - Response

    To learn more about YogaX, you can now listen to a podcast by Stephanie Cunningham of "Changing the Face of Yoga", interviewing Chris Brems, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Director of YogaX. Learn about YogaX, its underlying philosophy, its understanding of yoga, and more.

  • GQ

    How We Ruined the Dad Bod

    The term ‘dad bod’ has taken on a whole new meaning thanks to the unrealistic depictions of chiseled fathers on the big screen and TV. What was once viewed as the standard of normalcy has now led to body shaming. Sarah Adler, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences , and Dan Azagury, assistant professor of surgery, comment about the negative effect on self-esteem.

  • Bustle

    Experts Explain How 'Unbelievable' Exposes A Key Thing We Get Wrong About Trauma

    The misconception that we can somehow measure trauma — that there is a "right" or "wrong" way to react — is something that often comes up in true crime stories. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    11 Unexpected Health-Promoting Benefits of Yoga

    Aside from improving muscle tone and flexibility, yoga can be beneficial for chronic health conditions including asthma, heart disease, sleep issues and MS. Manuela Kogon, clinical associate professor psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes the benefits.

  • FRONTLINE

    Revisit Purdue Pharma’s Role in the Opioid Crisis

    This piece revisits a 2016 Frontline documentary, Chasing Heroin, which investigated America’s heroin and opioid abuse crisis – including allegations about the pharmaceutical industry's role in the early years of what has been called the worst drug epidemic in U.S. history. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Thrive Global

    Why do we sleep talk? Here’s everything you should know - Thrive Global

    Nearly 66% of the population has talked in their sleep in some form, according to a 2010 study. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted in this article.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Column: Kicking a dependence on prescription drugs can be very hard. Here's how I'm doing it

    This piece looks at the difference between dependence and addiction, particularly on prescription drugs. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • NYT Parenting

    How to Make Night Terrors Less Terrifying

    Night terrors, nightmares that cause screaming and thrashing in the night, are most common in toddlers and preschoolers, and can last up to age 12. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides input on the causes these episodes and how parent can handle them.

  • NBC News

    How to identify a narcissist — and cope with their potentially toxic behavior

    This piece discusses narcissistic personality disorder. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment here.

  • Dr. Keith Humphreys on the Campbell Conversations

    Dr. Keith Humphreys on the Campbell Conversations

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses marijuana legalization in a recent conversation on New York public radio.

  • AJP Residents' Journal

    AJP Residents' Journal: Interview with Anna Lembke, MD

    Senior Deputy Editor Matthew Edwards, resident in psychiatry, interviews Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about Addiction Psychiatry and her book Drug Dealer, MD.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Column: Hi, I'm David. I'm a drug addict

    This piece discusses how coming off antidepressants can mirror the struggle many people face in trying to wean themselves from prescription drugs. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Monthly

    Opioid Prescriptions in the U.S. Are Down, But It Still Leads the World

    This article, written by Keith Humphreys, examines new United Nations data on opioid consumption.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    How studying sleep in animals could unearth autism’s roots

    Problems with sleep may contribute to autism's underlying biology — a connection that scientists can study in animal models. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes this Viewpoint article.

  • Sacklers vs. States

    Sacklers vs. States: Settlement Talks Stumble Over Foreign Business

    The future of Purdue Pharma, and the Sackler family's ownership, is in dispute in the wake of lawsuits over its role in the opioid crisis. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Deseret News

    Could psychedelic drugs become the new medical marijuana? Inside the potential benefits and high risks of ‘magic mushrooms’

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this story on the use psychedelic drugs for medicinal purposes.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford student mental health and well-being services expanded | Stanford News

    A new model for Stanford students seeking mental health and well-being services is among the changes Vaden Health Center is making to better provide services in the future. Bina Patel, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of counseling and psychological services, provides comment.

  • Real Simple

    White Noise, Pink Noise, or Brown Noise—Which Color Is for You?

    Finding the right sleep noise can mean better sleep for years to come. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes how the ‘color’ of noise, machine-generated sounds, can affect the quality of sleep.

  • BBC

    Newsday - US drug-maker seeks to settle lawsuits over opioid cases - BBC Sounds

    Purdue Pharma, the American opioid drug-maker is in discussion to settle more than two thousand opioid lawsuits against it. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this podcast.

  • Scope Blog Stanford Medicine

    Pesticide exposure linked to brain activity differences in adolescents, study finds

    Teenagers exposed to common agricultural pesticides before birth had distinctive reductions in certain types of brain activity, a new study has found. Joseph Baker, Instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Allan L. Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, are co-authors of the study.

  • PBS NewsHour

    What Oklahoma's landmark opioid ruling could mean for other states

    A judge in Oklahoma rules that pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson contributed to the opioid crisis. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the ruling and the effect it could have on lawsuits pending against other drug companies.

  • World Journal

    Stanford CHIPAO to perform in the East Bay

    Members from Stanford CHIPAO will soon perform vignettes in the East Bay to help families learn to communicate more effectively about difficult topics. Rona Hu, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured here during a press conference with the mayors of Danville and San Ramon, and school board and PTA members.

  • This American Life

    Ten Sessions - This American Life

    What if someone told you about a type of therapy that could help you work through unhealed trauma in just ten sessions? Some people knock through it in two weeks. Jaime Lowe tried the therapy—and recorded it. This series features Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • PBS NewsHour

    Proposed rule could make it easier to share addiction treatment records

    The Department of Health and Human Services has proposed a new rule that would give doctors greater access to records of patients who are being treated for substance use disorder, in an effort to better coordinate care. This piece discusses how the change has raised concerns about the potential impact on patient privacy. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Science News

    Marijuana and meth are getting more popular in America, but cocaine has declined

    Trends in drug use and spending are difficult to map, but a new analysis reveals that by 2016, users were spending more on marijuana than other drugs. Keith Humphreys is quoted in this piece.

  • Science | AAAS

    Brain scans could help personalize treatment for people who are depressed or suicidal

    This piece discusses how a growing number of researchers are exploring the brain biology of mental illness, including depression, bipolar disorder, and active suicidality. The goal is not just to find biological markers of risk, but to tailor care accordingly. Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Laura Hack, clinical instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured here.

  • Psychiatric News APA

    Carolyn Rodriguez Wins Prestigious Award for Innovative OCD Research

    This piece covers Carolyn Rodriguez's innovative work and its many accolades, most recently a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) in July. The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects at the early stages of their careers and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research.

  • Popular Science

    Your annual checkup could soon include screening for illicit drug use

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends doctors should ask their patients about all the drugs they use. Michael Ostacher, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this story.

  • SFChronicle.com

    Doctor facing murder charges in opioid cases was already under investigation

    This article discusses a California doctor who is facing murder charges following patient opioid overdoses. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, is quoted.

  • Where Doctors Can Recommend Marijuana to Replace Opioids

    Where Doctors Can Recommend Marijuana to Replace Opioids

    Despite gaps in knowledge and uniform standards, several states now allow physicians to prescribe marijuana. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is included here.

  • Science | AAAS

    For a decade, Francis Collins has shielded NIH—while making waves of his own

    This piece profiles Francis Collins, who has served as director of the National Institute of Health for 10 years. Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.

  • CGTN America

    The Heat: Opioid crisis

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, participated in a roundtable discussion about the epidemic use of opioids and efforts to fight addiction.

  • Medium

    Does Sleep Position Affect Your Health?

    Sleep experts chime in on how you sleep in bed may affect your overall health. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed for the article.

  • SFChronicle.com

    Theater becomes therapy to help South Bay Asian American parents understand their kids

    Therapy doesn’t have to look like a one-on-one session with a mental health counselor. For Asian American families in the South Bay, some Stanford psychiatrists see value in a show-and-tell treatment. Shashank Joshi, associate professor, and Rona Hu, clinical associate professor, are quoted.

  • CGTN America

    The Heat: Opioid crisis

    Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, participates in a roundtable discussion about the epidemic use of opioids and efforts to fight addiction.

  • News Center

    One therapy bests others at motivating kids with autism to speak

    Tapping the interests and motivations of children with autism can help them understand the value of speaking and build their social skills, a new Stanford study found. Grace Gengoux, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is lead author, and Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author.

  • Thrive Global

    6 Things You Need to Know If Your Mind Can't Stop Racing When You Go to Bed

    Exactly what to do when you’re overpowered by nighttime thoughts. Fiona Barwick, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Psychology Today

    Scientists Use Optogenetics to Make Mice Hallucinate

    Stanford neuroscientists have stimulated nerve cells in the visual cortex of mice to induce an illusory image in the animals' minds. The work is a step toward understanding hallucinations. Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who led the work, is mentioned in this article.

  • MarketWatch

    Experts predict new FDA anti-vaping ads will be ‘completely ineffective’

    Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on new FDA ads that claim teens who vape are more likely to start smoking cigarettes.

  • Technology Networks

    Big Data Clarifies Emotional Circuit Development

    Several brain circuits that identify emotions are solidified early in development and include diverse regions beyond the amygdala, according to new research in children, adolescents, and young adults published in JNeurosci. Vinod Menon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and colleagues at the Stanford University School of Medicine analyzed fMRI data from 1,445 individuals aged eight to 21 from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort.

  • The Checkup

    Is it safe to take anti-anxiety medication with alcohol?

    Anna Lembke, medical director of Addiction Medicine, warns against the danger of mixing anti-anxiety drugs with alcohol.

  • 'Nothing less than transformational

    'Nothing less than transformational:' Ketamine brings relief to people with severe depression

    Some medical professionals say ketamine has made life-changing improvements for patients. Alan Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and M Rameen Ghorieshi, adjunct clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    New opioid data spurs widespread condemnation, calls for action

    Policymakers, media outlets and others are using data to understand the sheer scope of the crisis, and many are demanding accountability. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Wired

    Pinterest's New Search Tool Puts Stress Relief in Your Feed

    Soon the company will begin placing anxiety-relieving exercises within its search results to help boost your mood. Nina Vasan, a clinical assistant professor at Stanford's School of Medicine and the founder and director at Brainstorm, is interviewed here and in a TechCrunch article.

  • WWL

    Is the effort to combat the opioid epidemic working?

    Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about the latest CDC report that shows drug overdose deaths last years dropped for the first time in nearly three decades.

  • Washington Post

    An onslaught of pills, hundreds of thousands of deaths: Who is accountable?

    The drug industry — the pill manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers — found it profitable to flood some of the most vulnerable communities in America with billions of painkillers. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • News Center

    Stanford team stimulates neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice's minds

    Stanford neuroscientists have stimulated nerve cells in the visual cortex of mice to induce an illusory image in the animals' minds. The work is a step toward understanding hallucinations. Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor and professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who lead the research, is mentioned in this article and in pieces in Science, Nature, Cosmos and others, as well as in a Stanford Medicine press release.

  • Daily Herald

    Data show many companies contributed to US opioid crisis

    This piece examines the role of drug companies in the nation's opioid crisis. Keith Humphreys provides comment.

  • HuffPost

    If You Talk In Your Sleep, You Might Want To Read This

    Talking in your sleep is generally harmless, but there are a few cases where it can be cause for concern. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    Drug overdoses fell significantly in 2018 for first time in decades, provisional CDC data show

    Provisional data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that fatal drug overdoses fell 5.1 percent from 2017 to 2018. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

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To add an article to this page, please contact Mindy Hantke at mhantke@stanford.edu