Faculty Fellows

Sanjay Basu MD, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Medicine - Primary Care Outcomes Research

Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Stanford. Dr. Basu conducts research on health and social policies to reduce morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes in both the United States and internationally, typically using methods from the fields of computer science, econometrics, and large-scale data analysis.


Eran Bendavid MD, MS

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care & Population Health

Dr. Bendavid's work broadly investigates the drivers of population health improvements in developing countries. Dr. Bendavid studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health. He uses a mix of experimental, econometric, qualitative, modeling, and demographic tools to produce insights and strategies for improving health.


Marshall Burke, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Earth System Science & Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

Marshall Burke is assistant professor in the Department of Earth System Science, and Center Fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change, and on the economics of rural development in Africa. His work has appeared in both economics and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and the Review of Economics and Statistics. He holds a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from UC Berkeley, and a BA in International Relations from Stanford.  


Suzan Carmichael, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

Dr. Carmichael's research focuses on maternal health and pregnancy outcomes such as congenital anomalies, preterm delivery and stillbirth and encompasses a broad of array of exposures such as nutritional, environmental, social and genetic risk factors.  Dr. Carmichael has a PhD in Epidemiology and extensive experience with designing, implementing, and analyzing data from population-based epidemiologic studies.


Benjamin Domingue, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education

Ben Domingue is an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. He has two areas of active research. The first focuses on statewide standardized test scores and their uses, particularly how test scores are used in statistical models that evaluate the effectiveness of teachers and schools. On a technical level, he also is interested in the extent to which test scores and the data from which they are drawn demonstrate certain desirable properties. The second area of research focuses on the integration of genetic data into social science research. In particular, he is interested in understanding the genetic architecture of educational attainment and the way in which schools can and do moderate the association between genes and educational attainment.


Liran Einav, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Professor of Economics

Liran Einav is a professor of economics at Stanford University and a research associate in the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he is directing the Industrial Organization Program. Einav’s areas of  specialization are industrial organization and applied microeconomics. An important strand of his work is focused on insurance markets, including the development of empirical models of insurance demand and pricing, and empirical analyses of the implications of adverse selection and moral hazard. Einav has also studied consumer behavior and the pricing of subprime auto loans, competition in the motion picture industry, strategic commitment, and more recently peer-to-peer internet markets and healthcare markets. Einav is a co-editor of Econometrica and serves on the editorial board of several other journals.


David Grusky, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Professor in the School of Humanities & Science

David B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine.  His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S. and other high-inequality countries (with a particular focus on the “Great Gatsby” hypothesis that opportunities for social mobility are declining), (c) the role of essentialism in explaining the persistence of extreme gender inequality, (d) the forces behind recent changes in the amount of face-to-face and online cross-class contact, and (e) the putative decline of big social classes.


Ann Hsing, MD, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Professor [Research] of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

Dr. Hsing is a professor of medicine at Stanford University and a co-leader of the Population Sciences Program at Stanford Cancer Institute. A senior fellow for the Center for Innovation in Global Health at Stanford University, Dr. Hsing has conducted population-based epidemiological studies on four continents, including North and South America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. She is a leading expert in the epidemiology and etiology of prostate, hepatobiliary, and thyroid cancers as well as in hormonal carcinogenesis and circadian rhythm. Throughout her 22-year tenure at National Cancer Institute, Dr. Hsing developed extensive expertise in molecular epidemiology, global oncology, cancer prevention, and population-based studies in international settings.


Jure Leskovec, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor of Computer Science

Leskovec's research focuses on the analyzing and modeling of large social and information networks as the study of phenomena across the social, technological, and natural worlds. He focuses on statistical modeling of network structure, network evolution, and spread of information, influence and viruses over networks. Problems he investigates are motivated by large scale data, the Web and other on-line media. He also does work on text mining and applications of machine learning.


Paul Oyer, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

Paul Oyer studies the economics of organizations and human resource practices. His work has looked at the use of broad-based stock option plans, how firms use non-cash benefits, how firms respond to limits on their ability to displace workers, and how labor market conditions affect their entire careers when MBAs and PhD economists leave school. Oyer’s current projects include studies of how firms identify and recruit workers in high-skill and competitive labor markets, with a focus on the markets for newly minted lawyers and MBAs.


VJ Periyakoil, MD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor of Medicine (Population Health and Primary Care), Stanford University Medical Center

Dr. Periyakoil is a member of the study section for the National Institute of Aging, National Institutes of Health, the Senior Associate Editor of the Journal of Palliative Medicine and Associate Editor, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. She serves as the Chair of the Ethnogeriatrics Committee of the American Geriatrics Society, the Chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine’s Hospice & Palliative Medicine SEP Committee, Board member of the Council of faculty and Societies, founding Chair , Diversity Committee of the American Association of Medical Colleges. Her work has been and is funded by grants from NIH, HRSA, foundations as well as the Department of Veterans Affairs. 


David Rehkopf, Sc.D., MPH

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

David Rehkopf's work focuses on the way in which social and economic factors impact health and mortality across the lifespan, with particular attention to the impact of work and earnings on cardiovascular biomarkers and obesity.


Manuel A. Rivas, DPhil

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science

Manuel is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Data Science at Stanford University in Stanford, California.  Manuel has a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Human Genetics from the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine at Oxford University where he was a Clarendon Scholar.  He did additional training at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he led the Helmsley Inflammatory Bowel Disease Exome Sequencing Program to understand the genetic factors that contribute to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease risk. See NIH Biosketch for updated CV.


Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

Faculty Fellow, Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and of Biomedical Data Science

Dr. Nigam Shah is associate professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) at Stanford University, Assistant Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics Research, and a core member of the Biomedical Informatics Graduate Program. Dr. Shah's research focuses on combining machine learning and prior knowledge in medical ontologies to enable use cases of the learning health system.