News

Invited Speaker at United Nations 

Ivan Mejia-Guevara, senior research scientist with the Center for Population Health Sciences & member of the Mexican Delegation (Advisor) was invited to present his work "Intergenerational Transfers, Economic Growth, and Equity in Mexico" at the recent United Nations Commission on Population & Development 50th Session.


5 Questions: Steven Adelsheim on Santa Clara County youth suicide report

Steven Adelsheim, chair of the Adolescent Health working group, has been involved in several efforts to improve mental health care for young people in the Bay Area.  Dr. Adlesheim recently shared his thoughts on a new federal report on suicides among youth in Santa Clara County.


Stanford joins the University of California BRAID health-research alliance

Stanford University has joined five University of California campuses in a consortium dedicated to removing administrative barriers to sharing research resources, talent, productivity tools and bioinformatics expertise.


PHS Data Partner and Health Disparities co-chair win SPRINT Data Analysis Challenge awards

PHS Data Partner Clalit Health Services and Health Disparities working group co-chair Sanjay Basu have won first and third place respectviely in the SPRINT Data Analysis Challenge.  The Challenge, hosted by the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) seeks to explore the potential of clinical trial data sharing by bringing together trialists, data analysts and patients to advance health. 


Human health already suffers from climate change and the effects are getting worse, Stanford scholars say

Marshall Burke, chair of the Enviroment and Health working group and Eran Bendavid, PHS affiliated faculty member, discuss what we can expect and how we can mitigate the effects of climate change on health. 


Dean Lloyd Minor cites population health science as a shining light in an uncertain future

In a recent article penned by the Dean of the Stanford School of Medicine, Lloyd Minor highlights the work of PHS Faculty Director Mark Cullen and the ever-growing importance of population health science.


Stanford researchers aim to create global conversations about long, healthy living

The Stanford Center on Longevity's Laura Carstensen, co-chair of the Work-Life, Retirement, Disability Aging and Cognitive Decline working group, has launched an interactive website is designed to further research and to encourage officials, entrepreneurs and members of the public to think about ways of redesigning the human life.


Spectrum awards $1.74 million in pilot grants to 43 projects

Stanford’s clinical and translational research center has awarded funding to teams of multidisciplinary investigators who are tackling health care problems through novel approaches. Spectrum awarded grants in six areas: population health sciences; learning health care innovation; community engagement; medical technologies; predictive tools and diagnostics; and therapeutics. 

 


These 3 Food Myths Could Be Hurting Your Health, According to a Stanford Nutrition Professor

Christopher Gardner, chair of the Food & Nutrition working group, debunks common misconceptions about healthy eating in Fortune's weekly series Tools of the Trade.

 


Stanford receives $1.8M from the Sloan Foundation to build an infrastructure for research using “Big Data”

Building on the work of the Analytics working group, the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences has received a grant from the Sloan Foundation to build a model Data Core which will address current impediments and regulatory hurdles often faced by researchers.  Datasets will be presented in readily discoverable formats and documented on user-friendly portals; useable at low cost and presented with a wide array of analytic tools. To learn more about the project, visit out PHS Data Portal and Initiatives page.

 

Clalit Partnership Launched

On January 18, PHS welcomed Dr. Ran Balicer, director of the Clalit Research Institute, to Stanford. This visit marked the beginning of a research partnership, including the signing of a memorandum of understanding (pictured). During Dr. Balicer’s visit, PHS engaged researchers from across campus and initiated collaborations for population health research between Stanford and Israel. To learn more about the project, visit out PHS Data Portal and Initiatives page.

 

Lack of health care, food and shelter typically kill more civilians than bombs and bullets

Paul Wise, co-chair of the First 1,000 Days of Life working group, has published an essay titled "The Epidemiologic Challenge to the Conduct of Just War: Confronting Indirect Civilian Casualties of War" in the Winter 2017 edition of Daedalus. The American Academy of Arts & Sciences devoted its Fall 2016 and Winter 2017 issues of its journal to the theory of Just War. It held its 204th annual meeting at Stanford University in November, with Wise reviewing the main points of his essay.


Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick.

New research from Stanford shows that fitness monitors and other wearable biosensors can tell when an individual’s heart rate, skin temperature and other measures are abnormal, suggesting possible illness.  Michael Snyder, PhD, Professor and Chair of Genetics and Co-Chair of the GenexEnvironment working group is the senior author of the study.


Stanford receives $2.4M from the Gates Foundation for two population health studies.

Building on the momentum of the Adolescent Health, Sex and Gender and The First 1,000 Days working groups, Stanford has received $2.4M from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for two studies, which will be led by PHS affiliated faculty member, Gary Darmstadt.  The first study will analyze existing data to assess the relationship between gender norms and the well-being of adolescent girls.  The second study will evaluate the effectiveness of a novel maternal and child health intervention in Bihar.


Targeted approach to type 2 diabetes management proves effective in low-income and middle-income countries.

Sanjay Basu, co-chair of the Health Disparities – Global and Domestic working group, has published a paper “Comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of treat-to-target versus benefit-based tailored treatment of type 2 diabetes in low-income and middle-income countries: a modelling analysis" in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal.  The paper explores ethnic variations in diabetes complications and compares a precision-medicine approach to preventing such complications to a standard one-size-fits-all target-based approach.


Stanford researchers find 15 million children in high-mortality hotspots in Sub-Saharan Africa

PHS affiliated faculty member Eran Bendavid has co-authored a study determing that more than 15 million children are living in high-mortality hotspots across 28 Sub-Saharan African countries.  The study, published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet Global Health, is the first to record and analyze local-level mortality variations across a large swath of Sub-Saharan Africa.


Laura Carstensen elected to National Academy of Medicine

PHS working group co-chair Laura Carstensen has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine along with Stanford faculty members Christopher Garcia, Mark Krasnow, Mark Musen and Thomas Rando.

 


Early-career awards fast track researcher’s studies on poverty and health

Juggling her duties as a clinician and an instructor in family medicine, Rita Hamad is closer than ever to her goal of a research career, with the help of an early-career program and pilot grants.


Sex matters:  Why we shouldn't conduct basic research without taking it into account

In a PNAS opinion piece, published last week, two Stanford faculty are among the authors arguing that sex shouldn't be overlooked in basic research studies.  Marcia Stefanick, professor of medicine and director and co-founder of the Stanford Center for Health Research on Women and Sex Differences in Medicine, and Londa Schiebinger, director of the Gendered Innovations in Sciences, Health & Medicine, Engineering program, take issue with the fact that much of the research that leads to drugs, devices and our conclusions about biology comes from studies conducted on non-human animals and cell cultures without considering their sex.


$9 million grant to establish open-access autism database at Stanford

Dennis Wall, PhD, an autism researcher at the School of Medicine, is leading a new project to establish the largest-ever collaborative, open-access repository of bioinformatic data on autism.


To live longer, men need to embrace their femininity, new research suggests 

In cultures where women excel — racking up academic, professional and extracurricular accomplishments equalling or topping men — men live longer too, said Mark Cullen, MD, the first author of the recently published study that also appears in an abridged, reader-friendly form on Vox.


Stanford population-health sciences to add director, research opportunities

The center, under the directorship of Mark Cullen, will offer universitywide research funding, education and access to insurance claims and medical records databases.


The Road to Making Polio a Disease of the Past

Yvonne "Betty" Maldonado, MD, Stanford Children's Health, talks about how the World Health Organization hopes to have eradicated polio throughout the world by 2018 in her HuffPo column.


Seven ways laughter can improve your well-being

The science of laughter – though still preliminary – suggests that it has tremendous benefits for our health and psychological well-being, says Emma Seppala, PhD, associate director fo Stanford's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education.


Build it (an easy way to join research studies) and the volunteers will come

Just nine days after the launch of Stanford Medicine’s MyHeart Counts iPhone app, 27,836 people have consented to participate in this research study on cardiovascular health.

“To recruit that many patients into a traditional clinical trial would take years and hundreds of thousands of dollars,” said Michael McConnell, MD, professor of cardiovascular medicine and principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study.


Researchers get more than $23 million to launch centers for big-data research

Two new Stanford-based centers aim to help scientists effectively manage and use large, complex data sets.


Assessing the opioid overdose epidemic

In recent years, doctors and policy-makers have become aware of the dangers of prescription opioid medications like methadone, ...


Effort will aim to find out what makes for long, healthy lives

The Wellness Living Laboratory will examine lifestyle choices that lead to healthier lives.


Breast cancer patients with bilateral mastectomy don't have better survival rates

The first-ever direct comparison of breast cancer surgeries shows no survival benefit for women who had both breasts removed compared with women who underwent lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy.


Vast genetic diversity among Mexicans found in large-scale study

Some of Mexico’s indigenous groups are as genetically different from one another as Europeans from Chinese. Cosmopolitan Mexicans reflect these differences, which affect biomedical traits.


Obesity before pregnancy linked to earliest preterm births, Stanford/Packard study finds

Women who are obese before they become pregnant face an increased risk of delivering their babies before 28 weeks of pregnancy, a new study of nearly 1 million California births has found.


Mobile devices help remove barriers to fresh food

It's just a third of a mile from the East Palo Alto farmers' market to Runnymede Garden Apartments-the city's only housing facility for seniors and adults with disabilities-but to the building's residents, it might as well be a trek up Mount Everest.


Stanford joins the University of California BRAID health-research alliance

Stanford University has joined five University of California campuses in a consortium dedicated to removing administrative barriers to sharing research resources, talent, productivity tools and bioinformatics expertise.


PHS Data Partner and Health Disparities co-chair win SPRINT Data Analysis Challenge awards

PHS Data Partner Clalit Health Services and Health Disparities working group co-chair Sanjay Basu have won first and third place respectviely in the SPRINT Data Analysis Challenge.  The Challenge, hosted by the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) seeks to explore the potential of clinical trial data sharing by bringing together trialists, data analysts and patients to advance health. 


Human health already suffers from climate change and the effects are getting worse, Stanford scholars say

Marshall Burke, chair of the Enviroment and Health working group and Eran Bendavid, PHS affiliated faculty member, discuss what we can expect and how we can mitigate the effects of climate change on health. 


Dean Lloyd Minor cites population health science as a shining light in an uncertain future

In a recent article penned by the Dean of the Stanford School of Medicine, Lloyd Minor highlights the work of PHS Faculty Director Mark Cullen and the ever-growing importance of population health science.


Stanford researchers aim to create global conversations about long, healthy living

The Stanford Center on Longevity's Laura Carstensen, co-chair of the Work-Life, Retirement, Disability Aging and Cognitive Decline working group, has launched an interactive website is designed to further research and to encourage officials, entrepreneurs and members of the public to think about ways of redesigning the human life.


Spectrum awards $1.74 million in pilot grants to 43 projects

Stanford’s clinical and translational research center has awarded funding to teams of multidisciplinary investigators who are tackling health care problems through novel approaches. Spectrum awarded grants in six areas: population health sciences; learning health care innovation; community engagement; medical technologies; predictive tools and diagnostics; and therapeutics. 

 


These 3 Food Myths Could Be Hurting Your Health, According to a Stanford Nutrition Professor

Christopher Gardner, chair of the Food & Nutrition working group, debunks common misconceptions about healthy eating in Fortune's weekly series Tools of the Trade.

 


Stanford receives $1.8M from the Sloan Foundation to build an infrastructure for research using “Big Data”

Building on the work of the Analytics working group, the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences has received a grant from the Sloan Foundation to build a model Data Core which will address current impediments and regulatory hurdles often faced by researchers.  Datasets will be presented in readily discoverable formats and documented on user-friendly portals; useable at low cost and presented with a wide array of analytic tools. To learn more about the project, visit out PHS Data Portal and Initiatives page.

 

Clalit Partnership Launched

On January 18, PHS welcomed Dr. Ran Balicer, director of the Clalit Research Institute, to Stanford. This visit marked the beginning of a research partnership, including the signing of a memorandum of understanding (pictured). During Dr. Balicer’s visit, PHS engaged researchers from across campus and initiated collaborations for population health research between Stanford and Israel. To learn more about the project, visit out PHS Data Portal and Initiatives page.

 

Lack of health care, food and shelter typically kill more civilians than bombs and bullets

Paul Wise, co-chair of the First 1,000 Days of Life working group, has published an essay titled "The Epidemiologic Challenge to the Conduct of Just War: Confronting Indirect Civilian Casualties of War" in the Winter 2017 edition of Daedalus. The American Academy of Arts & Sciences devoted its Fall 2016 and Winter 2017 issues of its journal to the theory of Just War. It held its 204th annual meeting at Stanford University in November, with Wise reviewing the main points of his essay.


Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick.

New research from Stanford shows that fitness monitors and other wearable biosensors can tell when an individual’s heart rate, skin temperature and other measures are abnormal, suggesting possible illness.  Michael Snyder, PhD, Professor and Chair of Genetics and Co-Chair of the GenexEnvironment working group is the senior author of the study.


Stanford receives $2.4M from the Gates Foundation for two population health studies.

Building on the momentum of the Adolescent Health, Sex and Gender and The First 1,000 Days working groups, Stanford has received $2.4M from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for two studies, which will be led by PHS affiliated faculty member, Gary Darmstadt.  The first study will analyze existing data to assess the relationship between gender norms and the well-being of adolescent girls.  The second study will evaluate the effectiveness of a novel maternal and child health intervention in Bihar.


Targeted approach to type 2 diabetes management proves effective in low-income and middle-income countries.

Sanjay Basu, co-chair of the Health Disparities – Global and Domestic working group, has published a paper “Comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of treat-to-target versus benefit-based tailored treatment of type 2 diabetes in low-income and middle-income countries: a modelling analysis" in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal.  The paper explores ethnic variations in diabetes complications and compares a precision-medicine approach to preventing such complications to a standard one-size-fits-all target-based approach.


Stanford researchers find 15 million children in high-mortality hotspots in Sub-Saharan Africa

PHS affiliated faculty member Eran Bendavid has co-authored a study determing that more than 15 million children are living in high-mortality hotspots across 28 Sub-Saharan African countries.  The study, published online Oct. 25 in The Lancet Global Health, is the first to record and analyze local-level mortality variations across a large swath of Sub-Saharan Africa.


Laura Carstensen elected to National Academy of Medicine

PHS working group co-chair Laura Carstensen has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine along with Stanford faculty members Christopher Garcia, Mark Krasnow, Mark Musen and Thomas Rando.

 


Early-career awards fast track researcher’s studies on poverty and health

Juggling her duties as a clinician and an instructor in family medicine, Rita Hamad is closer than ever to her goal of a research career, with the help of an early-career program and pilot grants.


Sex matters:  Why we shouldn't conduct basic research without taking it into account

In a PNAS opinion piece, published last week, two Stanford faculty are among the authors arguing that sex shouldn't be overlooked in basic research studies.  Marcia Stefanick, professor of medicine and director and co-founder of the Stanford Center for Health Research on Women and Sex Differences in Medicine, and Londa Schiebinger, director of the Gendered Innovations in Sciences, Health & Medicine, Engineering program, take issue with the fact that much of the research that leads to drugs, devices and our conclusions about biology comes from studies conducted on non-human animals and cell cultures without considering their sex.


$9 million grant to establish open-access autism database at Stanford

Dennis Wall, PhD, an autism researcher at the School of Medicine, is leading a new project to establish the largest-ever collaborative, open-access repository of bioinformatic data on autism.


To live longer, men need to embrace their femininity, new research suggests 

In cultures where women excel — racking up academic, professional and extracurricular accomplishments equalling or topping men — men live longer too, said Mark Cullen, MD, the first author of the recently published study that also appears in an abridged, reader-friendly form on Vox.


Stanford population-health sciences to add director, research opportunities

The center, under the directorship of Mark Cullen, will offer universitywide research funding, education and access to insurance claims and medical records databases.


The Road to Making Polio a Disease of the Past

Yvonne "Betty" Maldonado, MD, Stanford Children's Health, talks about how the World Health Organization hopes to have eradicated polio throughout the world by 2018 in her HuffPo column.


Seven ways laughter can improve your well-being

The science of laughter – though still preliminary – suggests that it has tremendous benefits for our health and psychological well-being, says Emma Seppala, PhD, associate director fo Stanford's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education.


Build it (an easy way to join research studies) and the volunteers will come

Just nine days after the launch of Stanford Medicine’s MyHeart Counts iPhone app, 27,836 people have consented to participate in this research study on cardiovascular health.

“To recruit that many patients into a traditional clinical trial would take years and hundreds of thousands of dollars,” said Michael McConnell, MD, professor of cardiovascular medicine and principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study.


Researchers get more than $23 million to launch centers for big-data research

Two new Stanford-based centers aim to help scientists effectively manage and use large, complex data sets.


Assessing the opioid overdose epidemic

In recent years, doctors and policy-makers have become aware of the dangers of prescription opioid medications like methadone, ...


Effort will aim to find out what makes for long, healthy lives

The Wellness Living Laboratory will examine lifestyle choices that lead to healthier lives.


Breast cancer patients with bilateral mastectomy don't have better survival rates

The first-ever direct comparison of breast cancer surgeries shows no survival benefit for women who had both breasts removed compared with women who underwent lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy.


Vast genetic diversity among Mexicans found in large-scale study

Some of Mexico’s indigenous groups are as genetically different from one another as Europeans from Chinese. Cosmopolitan Mexicans reflect these differences, which affect biomedical traits.


Obesity before pregnancy linked to earliest preterm births, Stanford/Packard study finds

Women who are obese before they become pregnant face an increased risk of delivering their babies before 28 weeks of pregnancy, a new study of nearly 1 million California births has found.


Mobile devices help remove barriers to fresh food

It's just a third of a mile from the East Palo Alto farmers' market to Runnymede Garden Apartments-the city's only housing facility for seniors and adults with disabilities-but to the building's residents, it might as well be a trek up Mount Everest.


PHS YouTube

Visit our YouTube channel to see the latest videos from Population Health Sciences.