June 14 Jun 14
2019
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Friday Fri

Pediatric Grand Rounds (CME): Righting the Pendulum: Promoting Trainee Autonomy

Lee Trope, MD, Jessica Moriarty, MD, Sindu Vellanki, MD - Pediatrics Residency Program

This interactive session will begin with a modified group force field analysis to highlight the facilitating factors and barriers to promoting trainee autonomy. It will review the history of trainee autonomy and key principles of autonomy, as described in self-determination theory and entrustment decision-making. 

Speaker

Lee Trope, MD, MS

Jessica Moriarty, MD

Sindu Vellanki, MD

Session Description

According to the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), “a residency training program must foster in residents the skills, knowledge, and attitudes required to enter the unsupervised practice of medicine. [...] As residents gain experience and demonstrate growth in their ability to care for patients, they assume roles that permit them to exercise those skills with greater independence. This concept -- graded and progressive responsibility -- is one of the core tenets of American graduate medical education.” During the late 1980s, the balance of trainee autonomy and supervision received national attention in the wake of the burgeoning national patient safety movement, resulting in mandated restrictions on resident duty hours and provisions of increased supervision for physicians in training. It is within the confines of this system, medical educators of today are tasked with the responsibility of developing the physicians of tomorrow.

This interactive session will begin with a modified group force field analysis to highlight the facilitating factors and barriers to promoting trainee autonomy. It will review the history of trainee autonomy and key principles of autonomy, as described in self-determination theory and entrustment decision-making. The session will conclude with a discussion of individual and systems strategies that can be implemented to promote trainee autonomy, highlighting the scholarly work of the 2018-2019 Stanford Pediatric Chief Residents.

Education Goals

  • Identify facilitating factors and barriers to promoting trainee autonomy across clinical settings
  • Describe the history of trainee autonomy and key principles of autonomy, as described in self-determination theory and entrustment decision-making
  • Discuss individual and systems strategies that can be implemented to promote trainee autonomy

Location

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (West Building)
725 Welch Road, Auditorium (Room 180)
Palo Alto, CA 94304
USA

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Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (West Building)

725 Welch Road, Auditorium (Room 180)
Palo Alto CA, 94304
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CME Credit

Accreditation

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency.  The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

Contact Stanford Center for Continuing Medical Education for CME credit transcript. Email Magna Patel, RSS Coordinator at magna@stanford.edu or stanfordcme@stanford.edu.