January 18 Jan 18
2019
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Friday Fri

Pediatric Grand Rounds (CME) - Emerging Lung Disease in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Vivian Saper, MD - Stanford School of Medicine

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an unexplained auto-inflammatory condition initially described in the late 19th century. Pleuritis and pericarditis are known to occur in some children as part of the illness yet parenchymal lung disease has not been a feature. In the past decade, new biologic medications inhibiting potent cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 have gained traction as early therapy. 

Session Description:

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an unexplained auto-inflammatory condition initially described in the late 19th century. Pleuritis and pericarditis are known to occur in some children as part of the illness yet parenchymal lung disease has not been a feature. In the past decade, new biologic medications inhibiting potent cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 have gained traction as early therapy. Response to treatment with these products has been met with welcome therapeutic success. However, coinciding with the increased use of these drugs, severe and often fatal lung disease has been encountered. Results of an international collection of 61 cases of lung disease found in association with sJIA will be presented. This study illustrates the difficulty of addressing a possible drug related risk occurring in a complicated illness.

 

Education goals for this session:

  • Describe the features traditionally associated with sJIA
  • Appreciate that an often fatal lung disease is being increasingly recognized in sJIA
  • Be alert to clinical features appearing in association with this lung disease
  • Understand difficulties inherent to post marketing drug surveillance in a complex illness

 

Location

LPCH Auditorium, West
725 Welch Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304
USA

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LPCH Auditorium, West

725 Welch Road
Palo Alto CA, 94304
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Speaker

Vivian Saper, MD

Adjunct Clinical Professor, Pediatrics -
Human Gene Therapy
Stanford School of Medicine

CME Credit

Accreditation

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency.  The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

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