April 12 Apr 12
2019
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Friday Fri

Pediatric Grand Rounds (CME) - Don’t Just Do Something, Stand There; Unnecessary Care, Lessons Learned from Canada

Jeremy Friedman, MB.ChB FRCP - University of Toronto

This session will examine the scope and some of the drivers of low value care, including both unnecessary testing and treatment in pediatric healthcare.

Session Description:

This session will examine the scope and some of the drivers of low value care, including both unnecessary testing and treatment in pediatric healthcare. The 'Choosing Wisely' experience in Canada will be examined and some of the lessons learned including those in pediatrics at a large tertiary care children hospital will be shared.

Education Goals for this Session:

  • Learn why unnecessary care in pediatrics should be important to you
  • Understand some of the drivers of overuse of tests/therapies
  • Identify some enablers and barriers to implementing Choosing Wisely recommendations
  • Lessons learned from Sick Kids/Toronto and the Canadian experience

Location

LPCH Auditorium, West
725 Welch Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304
USA

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LPCH Auditorium, West

725 Welch Road
Palo Alto CA, 94304
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Speaker

Jeremy Friedman, MB.ChB FRCP


Associate Pediatrician-in-Chief, Hospital for Sick Children

Professor of Pediatrics, University of Toronto

 


CME Credit

Accreditation

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency.  The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html