OCTOBER 26 OCT 26
2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
FRIDAY FRI

Pediatric Grand Rounds (CME): Problematic Interactive Media Use (PIMU)

Michael Rich, MD, MPH - Boston Children's Hospital | Harvard Medical School

Adolescents, children, even infants spend increasing proportions of their waking hours interacting on mobile devices – communicating, learning, and entertaining themselves. We will review research on the media youth use and how they use them and on how those uses affect, in positive as well as negative ways, physical, mental, and social health. 

Session Description:

Adolescents, children, even infants spend increasing proportions of their waking hours interacting on mobile devices – communicating, learning, and entertaining themselves. Nearly all adolescents now have a smartphone and 45% say they are online 24/7. We will review research on the media youth use and how they use them and on how those uses affect, in positive as well as negative ways, physical, mental, and social health. We will examine those young people whose well-being has been compromised by Problematic Interactive Media Use (PIMU), with distinct subtypes of gaming, social media, pornography, and information-seeking. Finally, we will discuss best practices for preventing PIMU and other media-related health problems, how to identify PIMU in primary care practice, and how we treat PIMU at the Clinic for Interactive Media and Internet Disorders (CIMAID).

Education goals for this session:

  • Explore the influence on the media environment on the physical, mental and social health of children and adolescents
  • Review research on the positive and negative effects of the media youth use and how they use them
  • Describe Problematic Interactive Media Use (PIMU) and its four subtypes
  • Introduce the Clinic for Interactive Media and Internet Disorders (CIMAID) and its efforts to develop standardized nomenclature, prevention, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies

 

Location

LPCH West, Auditorium
725 Welch Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304
USA

Speaker

Michael Rich, MD, PhD

Director, Center on Media and Child Health
Boston Children's Hospital

Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Harvard Medical School


CME Credit

Accreditation

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency.  The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html