OCTOBER 12 OCT 12
2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
FRIDAY FRI

Quality Improvement Series (CME): Learning from Our System Failures

Lane Donnelly,MD, Jessey Bargmann-Losche, and Tua Palangyo - Stanford School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital

The Department of Pediatrics is looking forward to the new Quality Improvement Series, which will be held twice a year. Join us for our first session! Open to Stanford/LPCH/SHC facutly, fellows, residents, and staff only. This session will be held during the grand rounds time slot.

Session Description

An examination of our quality and safety infrastructure, including a review of cases determined to be serious safety events and the resultant action plans created from a root cause analysis of the cases.

Education Goals for this Session

  • To understand the process of determination of a serious safety event
  • To understand the root cause analysis process and examples of declared serious safety events
  • To be aware of incidents at our organization that have been determined to be serious safety events
  • To spread high reliability processes on our quest to eliminate avoidable patient harm.

Presenters

Lane Donnelly, MD

  • Chief Quality Officer, Lucille Packard Children's Hospital
  • Christopher G. Dawes Director of Quality
  • Professor, Stanford University School of Medicine

Tua Palangyo

Jessey Bargmann-Losche

Location

Auditorium, LPCH West
725 Welch Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304
USA

CME Credit

Accreditation

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency.  The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html