NOVEMBER 9 NOV 9
2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
FRIDAY FRI

Pediatric Grand Rounds (CME): Fellows' Housewide Debate - “In the Opinion of this House, Utilization of Limited Health Care Resources Should be Based on a Composite Measure Combining Longevity and Quality of Life”.

Sunny Anand, MBBS, D.Phil and Peds Fellows

In this debate, we are arguing whether we should use a utilitarian approach for the allocation of healthcare resources or not.  How do we balance the benefits for the one patient in front of us against the collective benefits for the many? 

Session Description:

In this debate, we are arguing whether we should use a utilitarian approach for the allocation of healthcare resources or not.  How do we balance the benefits for the one patient in front of us against the collective benefits for the many?  Many developed countries that spend much less on healthcare and have better health outcomes than the US have adopted a utilitarian approach for the use of limited healthcare resources.  However, such an approach has not found favor in American society, leading to unbridled spending on healthcare and bringing our economy to the brink.  For the US to thrive, both in financial health and physical/mental health, creatively we will have to address this issue. Those in training today will have to solve this equation within the next 5-10 years.

Education goals for this session:

  • Understanding the impact of limited vs. unlimited healthcare spending on the US economy.
  • Considering a utilitarian approach for allocation of limited healthcare resources.
  • Reviewing the bioethical constraints in making healthcare decisions using a utilitarian approach.
  • Examining the underlying American values that contributed to structuring the current healthcare system.

 

Location

LPCH West, Auditorium
725 Welch Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304
USA

Speaker

Sunny Anand, MBBS, D.Phil
Peds Fellows 

CME Credit

Accreditation

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency.  The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal: http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html