News From the Byers Eye Institute

News Stories

Clinical and Basic Research Advances

Other Clinical, Research, and Education Advances

Sept 2017: Kudos to Heather Moss, MD, PhD, assistant professor of ophthalmology, collaborating with faculty at University of Illinois Chicago, on their National Eye Institute R21 grant, focused on understanding (and one day preventing) perioperative vision loss.

Aug 2017: David Myung, MD, PhD, assistant professor of ophthalmology, has secured an NEI K08 Career Development grant, which he will use to advance his research on corneal wound healing.

Aug 2017: Congrats to Suzann Pershing, MD, PhD, assistant professor of ophthalmology, on her prestigious GEMSTAR R03 grant from the NIH, to facilitate her study of the many ways cataract surgery impacts patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

McCormick and Gabilan Faculty Awards

The 2017 Call for Applications is closed. The next Call for Applications will be in March 2018.

The annual McCormick and Gabilan Faculty Awards provide research/project funding to junior faculty women for career advancement, or to junior faculty men or women who support the advancement of women in medicine through research. Faculty from all lines are encouraged to apply and must be within the first 7 years of their first faculty appointments. Recipients are awarded $30,000 for up to two years. In addition, McCormick and Gabilan Faculty Award winners are provided the opportunity to participate in OFDD training opportunities that will advance their career development at Stanford. This award is endowed through the legacy of Katharine D. McCormick. For the past two years, we have received generous support from Stanford University's Gabilan Fellowship to endow an additional 2 awardees each year.

2017 Recipients of the award

Anupama Narla, MD

Patricia Nguyen, MD

Lucy Erin O'Brien, PhD

Ranak Trivedi, PhD

Sui Wang, PhD

Celina Yong, MD

OIS Lifetime Innovator Award

Emmett Cunningham, MD, (right) represents OIS in giving Mark Blumenkranz, MD, (left) the Lifetime Innovator Award

Friends and colleagues salute the career and contributions of Mark S. Blumenkranz, MD, MMS, the HJ Smead Professor Emeritus and director of the Ophthalmic Innovation Program. Dr. Blumenkranz was the recipient of the OIS Lifetime Innovator Award at the OIS@ASRS meeting in Boston.

In this tribute, Dr. Blumenkranz is credited for his ground-breaking contributions inside and outside of the clinic, including his establishment of the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford where he served as founding director from 2010 until 2015.

Andrea Kossler, MD, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, winner of the Women in Ophthalmology Mentorship Award

Andrea Kossler, MD, (3rd from right) receives the Mentorship Award at the annual WIO Symposium in San Diego, CA

The Byers Eye Institute at Stanford gives its heartfelt congratulations and thanks to Andrea Kossler, MD, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, winner of the Women in Ophthalmology Mentorship Award!

Mentorship is one of the most important determinants of a successful career. In recognition of the value WIO places on mentorship, the WIO Mentorship Award was created to reward outstanding mentors in the ophthalmology community. Awardees should have had a sustained career commitment to mentoring and demonstrated a significant positive impact on their mentees’ education and career, through advancing research and patient care in the field of ophthalmology. This award is based on the training experiences and success of the nominee’s mentees, not the mentor’s personal career achievements.  For the purpose of this award, mentoring is defined as the process of nurturing intellectual growth, professional guidance, supporting, career development, and promoting positive role mentoring in training and career development of mentees.

New Mary M. and Sash A. Spencer Center for Vision Research Established at Stanford

(Image credit: Courtesy Mary Spencer)

MAY 30, 2017

Philanthropic gift creates center to help accelerate translational research, recruit faculty and train the next generation of leaders in vision science.

Stanford University has announced the establishment of the new Mary M. and Sash A. Spencer Center for Vision Research thanks to a generous gift pledged by Mary Spencer in honor of her late husband, Sash. The new center, at the renowned Byers Eye Institute, will support innovative vision research and interdisciplinary collaborations across the Stanford campus.

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The promise of connecting research to care

Sash and Mary Spencer 

The new Mary M. and Sash A. Spencer Center for Vision Research at Stanford is at the heart of an ambitious vision for advancing research and creating new diagnostics and therapeutics that will change patient care. The goal of the center is to develop new cures and treatments for the most challenging eye diseases, such as macular degeneration and glaucoma, which impact the lives of millions of people – often leaving them partially or wholly without sight. The center will be at the forefront of the search for new diagnostics and therapies, both to prevent vision loss and to restore sight, while offering patients access to the latest research, technologies, clinical trials and treatments. It will build on the Byers Eye Institute’s reputation for innovation and patient-centered care.

“We are optimistic that with the establishment of this new center, significant advances in vision science will be translated into improved patient care, transforming the lives of millions suffering from eye disease the world over.”

Lloyd B. Minor, the Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Dean of the School of Medicine, said, “We are optimistic that with the establishment of this new center, significant advances in vision science will be translated into improved patient care, transforming the lives of millions suffering from eye disease the world over.” Of Mary Spencer’s gift he added, “This will create a remarkable legacy for Sash and Mary Spencer for generations to come. We are incredibly grateful for her trust and generosity.”

 

According to Jeffrey Goldberg, MD, PhD, Stanford’s chair of ophthalmology and director of the new center, “Many diseases of the eye still lack clear and effective methods of prevention, treatment or cure. Although much research is underway, bridging the chasm from the lab to clinical testing and ultimately to proven therapies remains the core challenge to making real progress.” He added, “Our goal for this new center is to bring together teams of interdisciplinary experts in genetics, imaging, stem cell and neurobiology with leaders in vision science. By harnessing the combined talents and energy available at Stanford and beyond, we can uncover novel therapies and bring them more rapidly to human trials – to real patients – so that others can benefit in the nearer term.” The center will also work toward the development of new diagnostics and methods to help predict eye diseases before they occur, leading to preventive and more personalized care – the foundation of Stanford’s focus on Precision Health.

 

A legacy of excellence

“I hope that Jeff’s vision for this center will be realized and it will become a place where leading vision scientists from across the country and the world will come together and share their knowledge.”

Mary Spencer, who suffers from the early effects of macular degeneration herself, believes this new center at Stanford will bring the brightest scientists together at the right place to make a lasting impact on the field of vision science. With the help of her philanthropic commitment, she hopes to witness in her lifetime the discovery of treatments for some of the worst eye diseases and also to create a legacy of excellence that honors her late husband’s memory. Dr. Goldberg and the early promise shown by his work using magnetic nanoparticles to promote regenerative therapies for the eye was a major factor in Spencer’s decision to support the establishment of the new research center. “I hope that Jeff’s vision for this center will be realized and it will become a place where leading vision scientists from across the country and the world will come together and share their knowledge,” she said.

Media Contacts

Eileen DiFranco, Director of Communications and Media, Medical Center Development:

(650) 724-5913, eileen.difranco@stanford.edu

 

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CLICK BELOW TO VIEW BROCHURE:

* Mary M. and Sash A. Spencer Center for Vision Research.pdf
Mary M. and Sash A. Spencer Center for Vision Research brochure

Stanford Belize Vision Clinic (SBVC)

Dr. Ann Caroline Fisher, Clinical Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, has opened the Stanford Belize Vision Clinic (SBVC) thanks to the generous donations and guidance of Dr. Don Listwin, founder of Belizekids.org and the Canary Foundation, dedicated to early cancer detection.   The site will provide much needed screening and care to children and adults with eye and vision problems.  In addition, the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health is supporting this endeavor as a unique model for resident education abroad, providing long term continuity of care and one-on-one faculty supervision during this international rotation.  SBVC offers comprehensive and specialty care, and also opportunities for clinical training in global ophthalmology.