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About Us

Learn more about the Stanford Nutrition Studies Group.


Research

Explore Stanford Nutrition Group's past research as well as current studies.


Events

Stay up to date with upcoming events and explore archived events.


Welcome

The Nutrition Studies Research Group is a strong and growing component of the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Our current research focuses directly on nutrition intervention studies. We aim to expand nutrition research beyond traditional nutrients and phytochemicals to focus more on dietary patterns, and beyond traditional outcome measures like cholesterol to include more recently-established risk factors for disease such as inflammatory markers and DNA-methylation. Dietary strategies for weight loss are also a topic of research interest.

Mission

It is the central mission of the Gardner Nutrition Research Group at Stanford University to conduct the most impactful nutrition science possible by undertaking diet intervention studies with large numbers of participants while increasing and maximizing the rigor of that science to a level far beyond what has been achieved in this field in the past.

Goals

Future goals include:

  • Conducting high-quality nutrition science that substantially impacts human health and national/global nutrition policies
  • Halting and reversing the obesity epidemic
  • Illuminating the underlying factors that explain the massive variability of response observed when different people follow the same diet (e.g., personalized/precision nutrition)
  • Shifting the focus of study outcomes from disease and risk prevention to wellness and optimal performance
  • Elucidating the role of the human microbiome in human health and determine the potential impact on health achieved from optimizing the dietary habits that support an optimized microbiota

Follow the link to see if we are currently recruiting for an upcoming study.

Join a Study:

Restoring Microbial Diversity

 

 

Christopher Gardner, PhD

Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center

Professor of Medicine at Stanford University