Topic List : Cancer

  • Improving cancer care in Nigeria

    Stanford physicians are engaged in an ongoing and wide-ranging collaboration with the country’s ministry of health and doctors at major university-affiliated hospitals to improve several areas of cancer care.


  • Mom’s fundraising boosts tumor research

    Bereaved mother Mycah Clemons raised money for a summer scholarship at Stanford for research on diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. The move sparked a series of experiments that have led to a possible treatment for the tumor.


  • Lung cancer patient back from the brink

    Eight years after being diagnosed with stage-4 lung cancer, whose treatment led to other health complications, Ginger Powell is cancer-free. “Being cared for at Stanford gives me so much hope,” she said.


  • Altered immune cells attack brain tumor

    In mice, a fatal brainstem tumor was cleared by injecting it with engineered T cells that recognized the cancer and targeted it for destruction. The Stanford discovery is moving to human trials.


  • Tracking cancer growth

    Cancer research that once involved years of painstaking work can now happen in months with a novel technique for studying cancer-related genes. The results reveal how combinations of mutations influence tumor growth.


  • Predicting success of lung cancer drug

    With the help of a new radioactive tracer, doctors can predict with more than 80 percent accuracy how well a widely-used lung cancer drug will combat tumors, according to researchers at Stanford.


  • Misbehaving cells predict relapse in leukemia

    Analyzing individual cancer cells has enabled Stanford researchers to identify the small population of cells that spur relapse in some children with leukemia.


  • Reducing side effects of a cancer therapy

    Stanford scientists created an odd couple: a modified version of an immune-signaling protein and a coordinately modified receptor for this protein. The two bind only to each other, easing an advanced anti-cancer therapy’s side effects.


  • IPS cells slow tumor growth in mice

    Priming the immune system with induced pluripotent stem cells prevented or slowed the development of cancer in mice, Stanford researchers found.


  • Potential skin cancer treatment

    Stanford researchers have learned how basal cell carcinoma evades drug treatment without mutating. The researchers found possible drug targets that may allow for more personalized treatment of this common skin cancer.