Topic List : News Topics

  • Mechanism underlying ‘workaholic’ heart

    A study led by Stanford Medicine researchers shows why so many mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a heart disorder, alter a key constituent of muscle cells in a way that makes it work overtime.


  • Technique for quickly spotting TB

    A newly created two-piece fluorescent probe gets activated when it comes in contact with tuberculosis bacteria in a phlegm.


  • Busting myths about milk

    Milk is a good source of calcium but isn’t necessarily the most critical factor for bone health, according to a Stanford researcher who recently discussed the facts and “facts” about milk.


  • Computers help diagnose rare diseases

    A Stanford method for comparing patients’ symptoms and gene data to the medical literature could greatly speed the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases.


  • Innovations in kids’ MRI scans

    Stanford pediatric radiologist Shreyas Vasanawala is tailoring MRI equipment to children. His work allows young patients to receive faster MRI exams that require less anesthesia.


  • Mystery of headaches, nausea

    By the time she was 24, Rachel Hale was on her fourth diagnosis and had been on headache medication for years. Then she met with Ian Carroll, MD, a headache and orofacial pain specialist at Stanford.


  • New target for antibiotics

    Boosting efforts to fight antibiotic resistance, Stanford researchers have found that a thin membrane, thought to be just a shrink wrap around some bacterial cell walls, has structural properties critical for survival.


  • Zulman on engaging high-need patients

    Patient engagement requires creativity, trust building and flexibility from health care providers, especially when treating high-need patients, a new Stanford study says.


  • Anesthesiologist Kevin Malott dies

    Malott, who was honored as the favorite instructor of Stanford’s anesthesiology residents in 2014, enjoyed providing care for young children.


  • Cell death via trigger waves

    In a cell, death is akin to falling dominoes: One death-inducing molecule activates another, and so on, until the entire cell is shut down, a new Stanford study finds.