Topic List : Neuroscience

  • Understanding ‘chemo brain’

    Three types of cells in the brain’s white matter show interwoven problems during the cognitive dysfunction that follows treatment with the cancer drug methotrexate, Stanford neuroscientists have found.


  • Home videos for autism diagnosis

    Algorithms generated through machine learning can sort through observations of children’s behavior in short home videos to determine if the children have autism, a Stanford study has shown.


  • Puzzle of mutated gene in Parkinson’s

    Why a defective gene is tied so strongly to Parkinson’s disease has baffled researchers. Now, a study led by Stanford scientists appears to have pieced together a major part of the puzzle.


  • $9.6 million grant to Stanford team

    The Stanford project, led by neuroscientists Tony Wyss-Coray and Marion Buckwalter, will focus on the influence of immune factors and systemic inflammation on the brain.


  • Using ultrasound to release drug

    Stanford researchers used focused ultrasound to pry molecules of an anesthetic loose from nanoparticles. The drug’s release modified activity in brain regions targeted by the ultrasound beam.


  • Major gifts to neurosciences institute

    In recognition of a gift from alumna Clara Wu Tsai and her husband, Joe Tsai, the Stanford Neurosciences Institute is changing its name to the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.


  • Concussion study in high school football

    Three Bay Area high school football teams have been outfitted with mouthguards that measure head motion. Stanford scientists hope to use the data to better understand what causes concussions.


  • What to know about concussions

    Angela Lumba-Brown, MD, co-director of the Stanford Concussion and Brain Performance Center, is the lead author of the newly published CDC Guidelines on the Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children. In a recent interview, she explained what families should know about concussions.


  • Repeated DNA arrays can confer psychiatric risks

    Repeated, human-specific DNA sequences are tied to an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, a Stanford study finds. It might be possible to treat the diseases with existing drugs.


  • Brain circuit tied to sociability

    Autism spectrum disorder is marked by severe social deficits. Stanford researchers were able to reverse those types of deficits in mice by activating a single brain circuit.