General Neurology Team

Yuen So, MD, PhD
Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
Chief, Neurology Clinics

Dr. So has over 30 years of experience in the diagnosis and management of neuromuscular neurological diseases. He received his Ph.D. From Rockefeller University, and his M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine.  He completed his Neurology Residency and Electrophysiology Fellowship training at the University of California Medical School in San Francisco. Dr. So held faculty positions at University of California at San Francisco and Oregon Health Sciences University before joining Stanford in 1999, where he is currently Professor of Neurology, Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs, and Chief of the Neurology Clinics.

Dr. So is board certified in Neurology with added Qualification in Neuromuscular Medicine by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and in Electrodiagnostic Medicine by the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine. His areas of interest include most areas of nerve and muscle diseases, in particular, myasthenia gravis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and neuropathy. His research focuses on peripheral neuropathy, ALS and myasthenia gravis.

Dr. So is passionate about teaching. He directed the Neurology Residency Training at Stanford for 11 years. He won the L. Forno Award for Teaching Excellence in the Neurology Department in 1999. He was nominated by Stanford medical students in 2005 for the AAMC Humanism in Medicine Award. He has also been included in Best Doctors list for many years.


Emmanuel H. During, MD
Clinical Associate Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Emmanuel During, M.D. is a neurologist and psychiatrist specialized in sleep medicine. He completed psychiatry residency in Paris, France, after which he relocated to the US to conduct neuroimaging research at N.Y.U., New York, with Drs. Osorio and De Leon. He then completed neurology residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, followed by a sleep medicine fellowship at Stanford University, where he joined the faculty as assistant professor with a dual appointment in Neurology and Sleep Medicine.

He directs the Stanford Parasomnia Clinic and founded the Sleep-related Movement Disorder Clinic. Additionally, he evaluates patients with a wide range of sleep and neurological complaints. Given his unique training and expertise, he has been receiving an increasing number of referrals for the evaluation of patients with complex neuropsychiatric and sleep disorders. He is particularly committed to teaching trainees at bedside and is actively involved in the core sleep fellowship and neurology residency curriculae.

Aside from his clinical work, he conducts several research studies as P.I. or co-investigator characterizing the natural history of idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder, the role of microbiome in restless leg syndrome and its relation with iron metabolism, or the role of an immuno-modulating drug on sleep architecture and quality. His most recent interest pertains to home devices that can enhance slow wave sleep (SWS) via auditory closed-loop stimulation. He is interested in studying the effect of SWS enhancement on sleep quality, cognition and biological markers related to Alzheimer's pathology.


Carl Gold, MD, MS
Clinical Assistant Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Gold joined the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program in 2016. He completed neurology residency at Columbia University Medical Center and advanced Neurohospitalist Fellowship training at UCSF. Clinically, Dr. Gold is particularly interested in diagnosis and management of uncommon and rare neurological diseases that present acutely.

As the leader of quality improvement efforts for the Department of Neurology, Dr. Gold oversees numerous projects with a common theme of improving the experience of patients hospitalized with neurological conditions. In addition, Dr. Gold is particularly keen to develop the communication skills of all neurology trainees. As the 2017-2018 Rathmann Family Medical Education Fellow, Dr. Gold has the unique opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate an immersive clinical communication program for all the trainees who rotate through the neurology service. Dr. Gold will serve as inaugural Fellowship Director for the new Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship program.


Olga Fedin Goldberg, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences


Scheherazade Le, MD
Clinical Associate Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Le received her MD from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine.  She completed her internship in Internal Medicine and residency in Neurology at Stanford.  She served as Chief Resident in Neurology and then continued her training as a Neurophysiology fellow at Stanford in both Epilepsy/Electroencephalography (EEG) and Intra-operative Neuromonitoring (IONM).  As a Clinician Educator, she is particularly interested in patient education, trainee medical education, tuberous sclerosis and clinical research.


Steven Lee McIntire, MD, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences


Mitchell Miglis, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences and Sleep Medicine

Dr. Miglis received his B.S. in Biology from the University of North Florida and his MD from the University of Florida. After serving as a medical intern at Washington Hospital Center/Georgetown University, he completed his neurology residency at Bellevue and NYU Hospital in New York City. He then completed two fellowships, the first in Autonomic Disorders at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center of Harvard Medical school, and the second in Sleep Medicine at the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center. Dr Miglis is board certified in neurology and sleep medicine by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Miglis treats a wide variety of neurological diseases and has a special interest in Autonomic Disorders, Sleep Disorders, and the interaction between these conditions.


Rebecca Miller-Kuhlmann, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Rebecca Miller-Kuhlmann, MD, is a board certified Neurologist and a Clinical Instructor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences. Her clinical interest focus on the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic conditions. She loves clinical medicine and works actively to maintain a wide-breadth of knowledge in order to best treat complex patients with multiple neurologic conditions. She was recognized with the Christine Wijman Humanism in Medicine award in 2017.

As a former public school teacher prior to her medical career, she currently holds an honors certificate in medical education from Stanford and is passionate about medical education. She served as an education chief resident during her training and has been recognized with an Neurology Clerkship Teaching Award and the Fisher's & Dunn Teaching Award for excellence in teaching neurology to Stanford medical students. She deeply enjoys working with medical students and residents both in the classroom and in the clinic. 

Her additional academic interests include mitigation of the epidemic of physician burnout, for which she is a graduate of the American Academy of Neurology's Live Well Lead Well Leadership program and has co-developed and directs a wellness & mentorship program for neurology residents and fellows. She has also completed the Stanford CELT (clinical education leadership training) program for developing skills in quality improvement and enjoys teaching and fostering quality improvement work within the Stanford Neurology Residency.


Kathie Lin, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Lin earned her medical degree at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine where was awarded a Dean's Scholarship and the Dr. Tryphena Humphrey Student Award in Neurology. She completed neurology residency at the Harvard Neurology Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston where she served as an administrative chief resident in her final year and was awarded the Michael Ronthal Resident Teaching Award. She then went on to complete her neuromuscular fellowship at Stanford.

She is board certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She has an interest in the diagnosis and management of neuromuscular disease in particular neuromuscular junction disorders, motor neuron disease, and focal neuropathy. Additionally, she is interested in medical education and developing a practical framework for teaching neurology and neurophysiology to medical students and neurology residents.


Sarada Sakamuri, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Sakamuri received her medical degree from New Jersey Medical School in Newark, NJ, where she focused on community health education and was elected a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.  She completed her neurology residency at Stanford University and served as chief resident.  She pursued her passion for neuromuscular disorders by completing fellowships in EMG/Clinical Neurophysiology and Neuromuscular Medicine at Stanford, and a concurrent research fellowship at Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center.

Dr. Sakamuri is board-certified in Neurology and in Neuromuscular disorders by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.  Her interests and research include respiratory dysfunction in neuromuscular disease, Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome, nemaline myopathies, and myotonic dystrophy.  

Dr. Sakamuri also enjoys medical education.  She is the Associate Director of the Neuromuscular Medicine Fellowship.  She previously served as a teaching fellow for medical students at Stanford School of Medicine, and as a clinical instructor at Jagiellonian University Medical College in Poland.


Dong-In Sinn, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Sinn is a board-certified neurologist in the division of autonomic disorders. After graduating from Seoul National University School of Medicine in South Korea, he completed internship and neurology residency at Seoul National University Hospital. Upon finishing three years of mandatory military service, he came to the United States for a family reason. He did a second neurology residency at Medical University of South Carolina and completed an autonomic disorders fellowship under Drs. Roy Freeman and Christopher Gibbons at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center of Harvard Medical School in 2016. His clinical interests include neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, autonomic neuropathy, postural tachycardia syndrome, syncope and baroreflex failure. He also treats a variety of other autonomic disorders.


Jessica Falco Walter, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Walter received her MD from Georgetown University in Washington, DC. She stayed at Georgetown for her internship in Internal Medicine and then moved to New York City to complete her residency in Neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She went on to pursue a Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship at Rush University in Chicago, IL, training in both EEG and EMG. Due to her particular interest in Epilepsy she went on to become the first Epilepsy Fellow at Rush University. Dr. Walter provides clinical care to general neurology patients as well as patients with epilepsy and enjoys teaching residents and medical students. She also has a particular interest in dietary treatments for epilepsy and clinical research.