Research in Nakauchi Lab

Translation of our discoveries in basic research into practical medical applications


Dr. Hiromitsu Nakauchi  

In the Nakauchi Lab, we are working on uncovering new diseases, elucidating the causes of disease, and developing therapeutic modalities by connecting the knowledge and methodology of basic science including immunology, molecular biology, cell biology, and developmental engineering with clinical medicine.  Our ultimate goal is to contribute to establishing new frontiers of stem cell therapy and to make clinical applications of stem cells a reality.

Current work in the Nakauchi Lab includes;

1.    Elucidation of heterogeneity and hierarchy in hematopoietic stem cells

2.    Rejuvenation of antigen specific T cells for efficient immunotherapy

3.    Generation of organs from iPS cells by way of blastocyst complementation

With respect to education, we aim to establish an environment where individuals can make the utmost use of their interests, personalities and abilities in order to foster potential researchers, as a human resource, with a succession of creative studies in the field of bioscience.

 

New Publications

"Depleting dietary valine permits nonmyeloablative mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation"Science, Dec.2016.

Abstract: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/science.aag3145?ijkey=RbzT7nkCHy5MY&keytype=ref&siteid=sci

Full text: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/science.aag3145?ijkey=RbzT7nkCHy5MY&keytype=ref&siteid=sci

"Inhibition of Apoptosis Overcomes Stage-Related Compatibility Barriers to Chimera Formation in Mouse Embryos" Cell Stem Cell, Nov. 2016.

"Stem cells and interspecies chimaeras" Nature (Review), Dec. 2016.

 

NEW!  Job Opportunity for Stanford Undergraduate students

We are looking for enthusiastic Student Research Assistants to work at professor Hiromitsu Nakauchi’s (https://med.stanford.edu/profiles/hiromitsu-nakauchi) laboratory in the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.  Dr. Nakauchi has recently published “A Safeguard System for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Rejuvenated T Cell Therapy” See Stem Cell Reports. 2015 Oct 13;5(4):597-608.  You would join the team to assist in developing rejuvenated T cells for lung cancer immunotherapy.  The lab is a multi-cultural environment; you will interact with graduate students, postdocs and a senior scientist to perform in vitro and in vivo experiments. We enjoy teaching and building new ideas. The lab is located at 3rd floor of Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research (SIM1 Building).  The ideal Student Assistant must have a can-do attitude and be a hardworking individual with a passion for science.  Preferably, candidates should commit to work in the lab at least 3 hours a day, 2-3 times per week during the school year. Previous lab experience is preferred but not required.  

To apply: Please email your resume and cover letter to Ms. Yukiko Murmann: at ymurmann@stanford.edu.

Nakauchi Lab hiking in Woodside, CA July 2, 2016