Information Resources & Technology (IRT)

Self Capture (Screen Recording) Recipes

  • Planning
  • Slides, Voice and Ink
  • Digital Whiteboard and Voice
  • Conversational
*If you are looking for information on recording events in the LKSC, please see this page.

Plan

  1. Clarify your purpose for creating videos. Will they serve as supplemental curricular material, public education, lecture replacement, or something else?
  2. Identify your audience and consider how this impacts the content you are planning.
  3. Define your learning objectives, both for the project as a whole and as you plan each video.
  4. If you are creating videos to replace lecture content, identify the lectures you plan to replace. Begin thinking about how those lectures could be broken down into more modular "chunks" of content.
  5. Think about ways you could evaluate your content's effectiveness (both current and planned content), and ways you can further refine or revise your content based on evaluations.

Create Content

  1. Determine the style of your recording. Popular formats can be found in the tabs above.
  2. Consider accompanying materials such as quizzes, readings, and other references for the project or for each video.
  3. Be aware of text size, image quality and copyright for materials used in your recordings.

Record and Edit

  1. EdTech has a booth that allows for recording two speakers' voices over on-screen activity (presentation, drawing, etc...) set up and ready to use. We will also have two mobile self-capture kits available for checkout soon. You can schedule it by submitting a HelpSU request.
  2. While editing recordings is an option, it's often easier to redo a recording. That said, there are times when using some software to edit a recording is convenient and useful. If you are unsure of which approach to take, consult with EdTech.
  3. Record at a resolution that will be legible and high quality. Currently, both 1280x720 (720p) and 1920x1080 (1080p) are good standards. Even if you intend to publish your video at a lower resolution or quality, creating a high quality archival recording now will allow you better options in the future.
  4. Consider having a colleague, TA, or student review your videos for content and style. You may want to make changes based on their feedback.

Publish

  1. Private videos for a course can be uploaded to Coursework. Please consult with EdTech about this.
  2. Public videos can be uploaded to YouTube or other sites. If you plan to make your videos public, pay careful attention to the use of any copyrighted material in your videos.

Evaluate

  1. Analyze the results of your project. Did this improve student learning? Did it improve the teaching, managment or delivery of your course?
  2. How can you use what you learned from your analysis to improve the quality of your materials?
  3. Are there things you would like to do differently next time? Are there better ways to evaluate your materials then the method you chose this time?

Slide Presentation with Voiceover and Annotation

Format:

One or more presenters will narrate a PowerPoint slideshow, possibly using digital ink.

Technology:

USB Microphone, Headphones/Speakers, Mac/Windows computer with MS Office. Screen capture software, pen-enabled monitor and digital ink software for annotating PowerPoint if annotation is being used.

Resources:

Depending on the way in which the recording is done, this format has the potential to require post-production to clean up mistakes, pauses and sections deemed to be unnecessary. This format can also be easily set up as a self-service.

An Example of this Style:

"Leydig and Sertoli Cells" with Dr Neil Gesundheit, MD.

Digital Whiteboard and Voiceover

Format:

One or more presenters will narrate a "whiteboard" session, using digital ink to write and draw on blank PowerPoint slides or in another application that allows for drawing, e.g, SmoothDraw or Photoshop.

Technology:

USB Microphone, Headphones/Speakers, and a Mac/Windows computer. Screen capture software, pen-enabled monitor and digital ink software for annotating PowerPoint or writing and drawing on a blank canvas (SmoothDraw, Photoshop).

Resources:

Depending on the way in which the recording is done, this format has the potential to require post-production to clean up mistakes, pauses and sections deemed to be unnecessary. This format can also be easily set up as a self-service. Additional training for non MS-Office software may be required.

An Example of this Style:

"Metabolic Pathway for Testosterone Synthesis" - Excerpt with Dr Neil Gesundheit, MD.

Conversational Presentation (Slideshow or "Whiteboard")

Format:

Two or more presenters will discuss content over a slideshow or "whiteboard" session, using PowerPoint or other applications as necessary.

Technology:

USB Microphone, Headphones/Speakers, and a Mac/Windows computer. Screen capture software, pen-enabled monitor and digital ink software for annotating PowerPoint or writing and drawing on a blank canvas (SmoothDraw, Photoshop).

Resources:

Depending on the way in which the recording is done, this format has the potential to require post-production to clean up mistakes, pauses and sections deemed to be unnecessary. This format can also be easily set up as a self-service. Additional training for non MS-Office software may be required.

An Example of this Style:

"Intro to the Endocrine System" with Dr Neil Gesundheit, MD, and Salman Khan from Khan Academy.

Stanford Medicine Resources:

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