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Immunology Highlights

2021

  • – Scope

    How long will a healthy older person live? A substance in blood may provide a clue - Scope

    A new study suggests that blood levels of a brain-derived substance in people in their 90s and 100s may accurately predict how much longer they're going to live. Tony Wyss-Coray, the D.H. Chen Professor II and a professor of neurology and neurological sciences, is quoted in this post.

  • – GEN - Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News

    Hormonal Coupling Identified That Incites Inflammatory Rage and Ages the Brain

    Stanford Medicine scientists have identified a key factor in mental aging and shown that it might be prevented or reversed by fixing a glitch in the immune system’s front-line soldiers. Senior author Katrin Andreasson, professor of neurology and neurological sciences, is quoted here.

  • – Scope

    Data from twins suggests gut bacteria are important in food allergies, says Stanford-led study

    A Stanford-led study of twins with and without food allergies has uncovered differences in the fecal bacteria of allergic and non-allergic individuals. Kari Nadeau, the Naddisy Foundation Professor and director of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford, is co-senior author of the study and is quoted in this post.

  • – Scope

    Stanford nanoparticle COVID-19 vaccine shows early success in mice

    Stanford researchers led by Peter Kim, the Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Biochemistry, have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that has shown in mouse studies to effectively build coronavirus immunities.

  • – Scope

    Predicting premature birth in low-resource settings

    A blood test that predicts if a baby will be born prematurely works well for pregnant women in developing countries, a Stanford-led study has found. Nima Aghaeepour, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, senior author of the study; Brice Gaudilliere, associate professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine; Martin Angst, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine; Stephen Quake, the Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and co-president of the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub; and Michael Snyder, the Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor and chair of the Department of Genetics, are mentioned in this blog post.


  • – Scope

    Data from twins suggests gut bacteria are important in food allergies, says Stanford-led study

    A Stanford-led study of twins with and without food allergies has uncovered differences in the fecal bacteria of allergic and non-allergic individuals. Kari Nadeau, the Naddisy Foundation Professor and director of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford, is co-senior author of the study and is quoted in this post.

  • – Scope

    Stanford nanoparticle COVID-19 vaccine shows early success in mice

    Stanford researchers led by Peter Kim, the Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Biochemistry, have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that has shown in mouse studies to effectively build coronavirus immunities.

  • – Scope

    Predicting premature birth in low-resource settings

    A blood test that predicts if a baby will be born prematurely works well for pregnant women in developing countries, a Stanford-led study has found. Nima Aghaeepour, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, senior author of the study; Brice Gaudilliere, associate professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine; Martin Angst, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine; Stephen Quake, the Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and co-president of the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub; and Michael Snyder, the Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor and chair of the Department of Genetics, are mentioned in this blog post.

  • – PLOS ONE

    Biosciences Proposal Bootcamp: Structured peer and faculty feedback improves trainees’ proposals and grantsmanship self-efficacy

    Grant writing is an essential skill to develop for academic and other career success but providing individual feedback to large numbers of trainees is challenging. In 2014, we launched the Stanford Biosciences Grant Writing Academy to support graduate students and postdocs in writing research proposals. Overall, this structured program provided opportunities for feedback from multiple peer and faculty reviewers, increased the participants’ confidence in developing and submitting research proposals, while accommodating a large number of participants.

  • – News Center

    COVID-19 severity affected by proportion of antibodies targeting crucial viral protein, study finds

    A comprehensive study of immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 associates mild disease with comparatively high levels of antibodies that target the viral spike protein. But all antibodies wane within months.


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