Doctors Shanthi Kappagoda and Gina Suh converse during a fellows reception

Fellowships


Infectious Diseases Research Fellowship

The traditional (research) fellowship in the Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographical Medicine at Stanford offers clinical training and research opportunities to physicians who wish to specialize in infectious diseases.  This fellowship is an ACGME-accredited program that combines clinical and research experiences.  The primary goal of the program is to prepare trainees for an academic career in either basic science or clinical research.

First Year: Clinical Training

The first year of the training program is dedicated to providing clinical exposure to a broad spectrum of infectious diseases.  Fellows spend the majority of the year rotating through the general infectious diseases consult services at our programs three hospitals  under the supervision of an attending physician.  In addition, fellows rotate through the Immunocompromised Host Service (ICHS) at Stanford, which specializes in the care of patients with malignancies, solid-organ transplants, and hematopoietic cell transplants.  Fellows also spend a month learning fundamental aspects of clinical microbiology and virology at the laboratories at the Hillview site. During this month each fellow also obtains training in infection control/hospital epidemiology at Stanford University Hospital.

A continuity clinic is maintained one half day per week throughout the first two years of training in the program: the first year in general infectious diseases clinic, and the second year in HIV clinic.  Fellows also participate in weekly didactic and research conferences.

Dr. Brian Blackburn, Co-director of the ID fellowship training program, meets with each first year fellow regularly regarding their progress and advises them regarding their clinical and research training.

Second and Third Year: Research

Beginning in the second year, fellows spend the majority of their time involved in research activities. The Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine offers an outstanding array of research opportunities in basic, clinical, or translational science supported by NIH training grants and other funding resources.  This is done under the supervision of a mentor(s) who can be chosen from among the diverse and outstanding faculty within the Division of Infectious Diseases.  We also encourage fellows to choose a mentor from any Department at Stanford including the Department of Medicine, Pediatrics (Division of Infectious Diseases), the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, other faculty in the School of Medicine, and the larger Stanford University community (outside of the medical school).  Dr. Lucy Tompkins, Co-director of the ID fellowship training program, is responsible for facilitating each fellow’s research training and selection of mentors beginning in the first year of the program.  She meets with each fellow in the program regularly to assist and advise fellows regarding their progress and facilitates their opportunities for research support.  Each fellow is encouraged to select a faculty advisory panel to meet with them regularly to review and facilitate their research progress.

Fellows typically spend three to six years as postdoctoral fellows in the program.  The division has an outstanding record of success in preparing and placing its trainees in prestigious faculty positions, public health careers, and industry.

For more information about the Division of Infectious Diseases research programs, please visit http://med.stanford.edu/id/research/

Clinician/Educator Fellowship Track

The Clinician/Educator (CE) Track of the infectious diseases fellowship offers training and educational opportunities to physicians who wish to specialize in the clinical practice and education of infectious diseases.  Our clinical fellowship combines clinical and teaching experiences into an experience tailored towards a clinical career in an academic environment.  The primary goals of the program are to train: (1) outstanding clinicians who will be adept at managing infectious diseases; and (2) future academic clinical educators.

First year

The first year of the CE Track is similar to the first year in the traditional (research) fellowship track of our program, and is dedicated to providing clinical exposure to a broad spectrum of infectious diseases. Fellows spend the majority of the year rotating through the general infectious diseases consult services at or program’s three hospitals under the supervision of an attending physician.  In addition, fellows rotate through the Immunocompromised Host Service (ICHS) at Stanford, which specializes in the care of patients with malignancies, solid-organ transplants, and hematopoietic cell transplants.  Fellows also spend a month learning fundamental aspects of clinical microbiology and virology at the laboratories at the Hillview site. During this month each fellow also obtains training in infection control/hospital epidemiology at Stanford University Hospital.

Second year

The second year of the CE Track includes time on clinical services as well as other activities geared towards training an outstanding academic clinician-educator.  Elective opportunities include potential experiences in pediatric infectious diseases, hematopoietic cell transplantation, infection control, antimicrobial stewardship, and/or outpatient elective ID experiences including travel/tropical medicine clinic, orthopedic ID clinic, TB clinic, viral hepatitis clinic, immunocompromised host ID clinic and STD clinic, among others. 

A continuity clinic is maintained one half day per week throughout the two years of training in the program: the first year in general infectious diseases clinic, and the second year in HIV clinic.  Fellows also participate in weekly didactic and research conferences.

In addition to clinical work, the CE fellow participates in at least one of several scholarly activities, as chosen designed by the individual fellow.  A sampling of opportunities includes:

  • Antibiotic stewardship programs and other initiatives through the Stanford Hospital Infection Control Department  (Infection Control)
  • Publication of case reports, case series, and/or book chapters
  • Formal training in medical education
  • Participation in teaching activities for fellows, internal medicine housestaff, and/or medical students
  • Development of protocols in conjunction with ID faculty for use by our division or in collaboration with other consulting divisions
  • Developing quality improvement projects

The program is supportive of CE Track fellows’ specific learning goals and aims to adapt the second year of the program to meet the needs of the individual fellow.

Immunocompromised Host Infectious Diseases Fellowship

The Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine at Stanford also has a one-year fellowship in the expanding field of Immunocompromised Host Infectious Diseases.  This clinical (non-ACGME accredited) fellowship offers specialized training in infectious diseases specific to patients with compromised immune systems, including those undergoing chemotherapy for treatment for malignancies, solid organ transplantation, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and other patients with innate or acquired immunodeficiencies.  Fellows spend several months during the year rotating on the Stanford Immunocompromised Host Service, and also spend time on the primary services of many of the consulting teams such as BMT, hematology, the various solid organ transplant services, and on clinical electives.

Eligible applicants will preferably have completed at least two years of an ACGME-accredited ID fellowship program, and be either board certified or board eligible in infectious diseases, and board certified in internal medicine.  The application process for this fellowship is separate from our other fellowships, and does not involve the National Residency Matching Program.  To apply, please submit:

* A brief statement of interest;
* A current curriculum vitae;
* Reference letters from a program director and 1-2 others who know the applicant well.

The fellowship generally starts in July and ends the following June.  We generally review applications in the late fall (November – December) and select a fellow for this position in January, to begin in July.  We will update with more specific dates for the next application cycle when they become available.